Tag Archives: 2017

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Eighteenth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Dominic, August 8,2017

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Eighteenth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Dominic, August 8,2017

Born in 1170 A.D. in Calaruega, Spain, Dominic de Guzman attended the university at Palencia. Ordained an Augustinian Canon, he went to France where the Albigensians were misleading the faithful with their notion of “purity” founded on a rejection of the material order. Dominic converted many through his austere witness and his sound preaching informed by Scripture. Later Thomas Aquinas expressed this characteristic rhythm of Dominican life: “To contemplate and to give to others the fruits of contemplation.” Young men joined him and, in 1216 A.D., the Order of Preachers was approved by Pope Honorius III who looked to Dominic’s brethren as “future champions of the faith and the true lights of the world.” He also founded an order of contemplative nuns in 1206 A.D. Dominic died in 1221 A.D. “Your strong love burned with heavenly fire and God-like zeal. With all the fervor of an impetuous heart and with an avowal of perfect poverty, you spent your whole self in the cause of the apostolic life” (Blessed Jordan of Saxony). read more

Readings & Reflections: Monday of the Eighteenth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Cajetan, August 7,2017

Readings & Reflections: Monday of the Eighteenth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Cajetan, August 7,2017

The children of Israel lament, “We are famished,” yet “we see nothing before us but this manna.” The disciples of Jesus lament: The people are famished, but all we have is five loaves and two fish. God’s response is always superabundance: from manna, to multiplied loaves, to the Eucharistic flesh of his own Son.

AMDG+

Opening Prayer

“Lord Jesus Christ, you satisfy the deepest longings of our hearts and you feed us with the finest of wheat (Psalm 81:16). Fill me with gratitude for your blessings and give me a generous heart that I may freely share with others what you have given to me.” In your NAME, I pray. Amen. read more

Readings & Reflections with Cardinal Tagle’s Video: Feast of the Transfiguration of the Lord A, August 6,2017

Readings & Reflections with Cardinal Tagle’s Video: Feast of the Transfiguration of the Lord A, August 6,2017

Christ’s Tabor radiance is a kind of mirror in which we glimpse the glory that God wills to give his friends. The resplendence of the Transfiguration reveals the fullness of life destined to be ours. The Transfiguration invites us to configuration. As we peer into the glory that pours from every pore of the transfigured Christ, we cast off everything unworthy of our personal relationship with the Infinite, and we take on the luster of the Son of God. Jesus gazes back at us with a luminous look of love that makes us desire to live his transparent beauty – to be luminaries. Silently from Tabor’s splendor, the Savior begs: “Become what you behold!” read more

Readings & Reflections: Saturday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time & Dedication of St. Mary Major Basilica, August 5,2017

Readings & Reflections: Saturday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time & Dedication of St. Mary Major Basilica, August 5,2017

Saint Mary Major, the oldest of Rome’s Marian churches, was consecrated to Mary by Pope Sixtus III around the year 435 A.D. Here Mary is venerated as Salus Populi Romani, “Salvation of the People of Rome.” During his pontificate, Saint John Paul II maintained an oil lamp that burned constantly before the icon of Mary. “In regard to Marian devotion,” he wrote, “each of us must understand that such devotion not only addresses a need of the heart… but… it also corresponds to the objective truth about the Mother of God…. The Mother of God is the Mother of the Church.” read more

Readings & Reflections: Friday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time & St. John Vianney, August 4,2017

Readings & Reflections: Friday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time & St. John Vianney, August 4,2017

John was born in 1786 A.D., in Dardilly, France, to devout peasants. A man of “average intelligence,” John passed his seminary exams with difficulty, and was ordained at the age of twenty-nine. He was ordained a diocesan priest and assigned to the tiny village of Ars, where he worked great good through his attention to the poor, moving preaching, and long hours in the confessional. “Lord, grant me the conversion of my parish; I am willing to suffer whatever you wish, for my entire life!” was his ardent prayer. With little sleep and less food, he catechized, preached, provided for the poor, and heard confessions. Up to sixteen hours a day were spent reconciling sinners to God. Pope Benedict XVI described this audacious “pastoral plan” as “the complete identification of the man with his ministry.” He died in 1859 A.D. at the age of seventy-three and is the patron of priests. “Were we realize fully what a priest is on earth, we would die – not of fright, but of love,” he taught. “Without the priest, the Passion and Death of our Lord would be of no avail…. What use filled with gold, were there no one to open its door?” read more

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Peter Julian Eymard, August 3,2017

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Peter Julian Eymard, August 3,2017

Born in 1811 A.D. in La Mure d’Isere, France, Peter Julian Eymard struggled against his father’s virulent anticlericalism to begin studies for the priesthood. Eventually he entered the Marist Order. In 1856 A.D. He founded the Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament. The priests devoted themselves to adoration and catechizing adults – many of them unemployed – who had not received First Communion. In later years, Peter suffered illness and criticism. He died in 1868 A.D. “The inner gift of self is the real gift,” Peter taught, “because then our Lord becomes our Savior… by giving us his own form of life.” read more

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Eusebius of Vercelli, August 2,2017

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Eusebius of Vercelli, August 2,2017

Eusebius was a model bishop of the 4th century: faithful, vigilant, long-suffering. His father had died a martyr. The people of Vercelli, Italy, recognized Eusebius’ own ardent devotion and elected him their bishop. Inspired by the writings of the Desert Fathers, he “brought the monastery to the city,” establishing a strict rule for the diocesan clergy. Because of Eusebius’ fidelity to the Nicene Creed, the Emperor Constantius exiled him to Palestine, where the Arian Bishop Patrophilus had him dragged through the streets and thrown into prison. When he returned to Vercelli, Eusebius urged his flock “to guard the faith jealously, to preserve harmony, to be assiduous in prayer.” He died in 371 A.D. read more

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Alphonsus Liguori, August 1,2017

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Alphonsus Liguori, August 1,2017

Born in 1696 A.D. to a noble and devout family, Alphonsus received his degrees in civil and canon law at sixteen. After seven years of outstanding successes in the courtroom, he lost a case after a simple mistake. Driven to prayer, he heard the Lord’s voice: “Leave the world and give yourself to me.” He left off a promising law career to enter the priesthood to embark on a priestly ministry to the disenfranchised. He was drawn to work with thieves, prostitutes, and the destitute. At his “evening chapels” he led the laborers of Naples in prayer and study of the catechism. In 1732 A.D., he founded the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer (the Redemptorists) to give missions among the peasants and endured jealousy from the lax diocesan clergy and suspicion from civil authorities. His moral theology was forged in the trenches. Against the reigning Jansenism, with its emphasis on justice, Alphonsus preached mercy from his see at Sant’Agata Dei Goti, Italy, and in his many writings. As bishop he preached God’s mercy between bouts of crippling rheumatoid arthritis. He suffered at the end of his life from the deception of an ambitious cleric. Throughout, the Eucharist was his strength. “If you desire to find him immediately, see – he is quite close to you. Tell him what you desire, for it is to console you and grant your prayer that he remains in the tabernacle.” He died in 1787 A.D. and was named a Doctor of the Church in 1871 A.D. read more

Readings & Reflections: Monday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Ignatius of Loyola, July 31,2017

Readings & Reflections: Monday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Ignatius of Loyola, July 31,2017

Ignatius was born in 1491 A.D. in northern Spain. From a young age he loved tales of romance and chivalry. He spent his youth gambling, fighting, and vying for the affections of noblewomen. In 1520 A.D., Ignatius’ leg was shattered in a military battle, and during his recovery he read stories of the saints and the life of Christ which stirred him to conversion. Ignatius noticed that the saints’ stories produced a peace in his soul, a marked contrast to the impact that the courtly romances had on him. Later, this “discernment of spirits” would become an important feature of Ignatius’ Spiritual Exercises. After nine months doing penance at Manresa and years of study in Paris, Ignatius developed a devoted group of followers namely, Francis Xavier, Peter Paber, and the original members of the Society of Jesus. In the last fifteen years of his life, Ignatius led the order from Rome, writing almost 7,000 letters to encourage and guide his brethren. Pope Paul III approved the “Society of Jesus” in 1540 A.D. Ignatius died in 1556 A.D. read more

Readings & Reflections with Cardinal Tagle’s Video: Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time A & St. Peter Chrysologus, July 30,2017

Readings & Reflections with Cardinal Tagle’s Video: Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time A & St. Peter Chrysologus, July 30,2017

God says to Solomon, “Ask something of me and I will give it to you.” “The Lord was pleased that Solomon” asked for an understanding heart instead of for long life or riches. For with such a request, God can work miracles. “All things work for good for those who love God.” The desire of Solomon is what characterizes the heart of the man who sells all he has to buy the treasure-bearing field. The desire of Solomon is what sets apart the merchant who risks his whole livelihood to buy what he judges to be the “pearl of great price.” They can make these sacrifices with certainty because that treasure, that pearl corresponds to the deepest longings of the “understanding heart “ – it is Christ himself. read more