Tag Archives: 2017

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Twenty-eighth Week in Ordinary Time & Sts. John de Brébeuf and Isaac Jogues & Companions, October 19,2017

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Twenty-eighth Week in Ordinary Time & Sts. John de Brébeuf and Isaac Jogues & Companions, October 19,2017

Father John de Brebeuf and his eight companions, all associated with the Jesuits, were among the first missionaries to the native people of North America. Their work among the Huron, Iroquois, and Mahawks saw little progress while they lived; the natives blamed the “blackrobes” for every misfortune. The missions grew, watered by their blood, which was spilled in various massacres from 1642 to 1649. In the years that followed, many of the remaining natives accepted Christ, most notably Saint Kateri Tekakwitha, who was born in the same village near Auriesville, New York, were three martyrs attained their crowns. read more

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Twenty-eighth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Ignatius of Antioch, October 17,2017

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Twenty-eighth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Ignatius of Antioch, October 17,2017

St. Ignatius of Antioch was born in Syria of pagan parents. He became a disciple of St. John the Evangelist and became bishop of Antioch ca. 69 A.D. Then he was condemned to death during Trajan’s persecution of Christians. He was taken to Rome under a military guard of 10 soldiers, and during this journey wrote six letters to six churches of Ephesus, Magnesia, Tralles, Smyrna, Rome and Philadelphia. The letters stress the divinity and the humanity of Jesus, his bodily death and resurrection, the central importance of the Eucharist and the bishop for church unity, and the special reverence owed to the church of Rome as the one founded by Peter and Paul. Upon reaching to Rome, he was taken to the Colosseum and thrown to the lions, dying almost immediately. As he wrote in his letters, he described himself as “the wheat of God to be ground by the teeth of wild beast to become pure bread.” He believed that his own discipleship was grounded in his imitation of the sufferings of Christ. For that reason, he welcomed martyrdom ca. 107 A.D. read more

Readings & Reflections: Monday of the Twenty-eighth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Margaret Mary Alacoque, October 16,2017

Readings & Reflections: Monday of the Twenty-eighth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Margaret Mary Alacoque, October 16,2017

The “evil generation seeks a sign, but no sign will be given it.” Why? Because Something Greater is already in their midst – Jesus Christ. The problem is their refusal to use their freedom to see how this sign corresponds with their desires. Those who live “the obedience of faith” recognize that we “are called to belong to Jesus Christ.”

AMDG+

Opening Prayer read more

Readings & Reflections with Cardinal Tagle’s video: Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time A & St. Teresa of Avila, October 15,2017

Readings & Reflections with Cardinal Tagle’s video: Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time A & St. Teresa of Avila, October 15,2017

One of the most terrifying aspects of the gift of freedom is that it leaves us the option of rejecting God. God prepares an irresistible weeding feast and invites us to it… but so often we refuse. This is the phenomenon of impenetrability: the refusal to let ourselves be struck even by the most beautiful thing that is put before us. We prefer instead to let ourselves remain all closed – we do not let our “I” be touched by anything even the “You” of God. Nonetheless, God will never cease providing for all peoples this rich feast of his Son. For true happiness comes when I realize the “I can do all things in him who strengthens me.” “Let us rejoice and be glad that he has save us.” read more

Readings & Reflections: Saturday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Callistus 14, October 14,2017

Readings & Reflections: Saturday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Callistus 14, October 14,2017

The cemetery of Callistus is perhaps the best known repository of he remains of the early martyrs. The man Callistus was its caretaker, and, according to the only contemporary account we have of his life, a former slave. While he administered the cemetery, Callistus worked closely with Pope Zephyrinus, whom he succeeded as pope around 217 A.D. What we know of his papacy is telling, for it comes to us from the Roman priest Hippolytus, his severe critic. Hippolytus lambasted Callistus for his unwillingness to excommunicate grave sinners who sought to confess and do penance. In defiance, Hippolytus assumed papal privileges for himself, becoming the first antipope. Callistus’ compassion recalls the words of our Lord: “Those who are well do not need a physician, but the sick do. I did not come to call the righteous but sinners” (Mk 2:17). His faithful witness was crowned with martyrdom in the year 222 A.D. Hippolytus later repented and was martyred around the year 236 A.D. read more

Readings & Reflections: Friday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time & Blessed Marie-Rose Durocher, October 13,2017

Readings & Reflections: Friday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time & Blessed Marie-Rose Durocher, October 13,2017

Joel forebodes that the coming “day of the Lord” will be “a day of darkness and of gloom.” And Jesus warns that “every kingdom divided against itself will be laid waste.” That is why the prophet’s counsel is our only protection: “Call an assembly; gather all who dwell in the land into the house of the Lord.” Our unity is our salvation. “Whoever is not with me is against me.” We can be certain that we are with Jesus by remaining with each other in the companionship of the Church. read more

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Francis Xavier Seelos, October 12,2017

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time St. Francis Xavier Seelos, October 12,2017

Jesus asks: Surprise a friend of yours come begging for food at midnight for a guest newly arrived? If we are like God – who is like any real friend and “listens attentively” – we will help him. Our reverent asking brings out al that is fatherly in God: “I will have compassion on them, as a man has compassion on his son.” It is through our persistence in prayer that we discover what God always promised: “They shall be mine – my own special possession.” read more

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. John XXIII, October 11,2017

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. John XXIII, October 11,2017

John XXIII was born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli, the third of thirteen children, to poor Italian sharecroppers. After the seminary he studied in Rome on scholarship. He served as a secretary to the bishop in Bergamo, and as a diplomat for the Holy See. At the age of seventy-six, he was elected in 1958 as a supposed “interim pope.” Three years later he called the bishops together in ecumenical council to address the Church’s mission to the modern world. The Second Vatican Council convened on October 11,1962. “Good Pope John” offered the Second Vatican Council as the  “balm of mercy” to the world. “The great desire… of the Catholic Church in raising aloft at this Council the torch of truth, is to show herself to the world as the loving mother of all mankind; gentle, patient, and full off tenderness and sympathy for her separated children.” John died the next year in 1963. “I live by the mercy of Jesus,” he had said, “to whom I owe everything and from whom I expect everything.” read more

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Francis Borgia, October 10,2017

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Francis Borgia, October 10,2017

The exceptional presence of the Prophet Jonah moves the wayward people of Nineveh to repentance and penitence – “by their actions… they turn from their evil way.” The only antidote to the anxiety, aggravations, and frustrations of daily life is a Presence. If we choose the presence of Jesus over our own obsessions, as Mary does today, it will not be taken from us. read more

Readings & Reflections: Monday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Denis & Companions, October 9,2017

Readings & Reflections: Monday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Denis & Companions, October 9,2017

A high hill outside Paris is supposed to have been a worship site for ancient pagan Druids. According to tradition, when Denis and his two companions arrived in the Roman territory of Gaul in the 3rd century, they preached to these pagans. Their enthusiasm for the Gospel won many hearts but also drew the ire of the Druids priests, who agitated the Roman authorities. The three missionaries gave their lives for the Faith on this same hill, which thenceforth was called Montmartre, “the mount of the martyrs.” Denis is France’s first patron. read more