Category Archives: Daily readings with reflections

Readings & Reflections: Saturday of the Twenty-sixth Week in Ordinary Time & Our Lady of the Rosary, October 7,2017

Readings & Reflections: Saturday of the Twenty-sixth Week in Ordinary Time & Our Lady of the Rosary, October 7,2017

“It could be said that each mystery of the rosary, carefully meditated, sheds light on the mystery of man. ‘Cast your burden on the Lord and he will sustain you’ (Ps 55:23). To pray the rosary is to hand over our burdens to the merciful hearts of Christ and his Mother. The rosary does indeed ‘mark the rhythm of human life,’ bringing it into harmony with the ‘rhythm’ of God’s own life, in the joyful communion of the Holy Trinity, our life’s destiny and deepest longing. Through the rosary the faithful receive abundant grace, as though from the very hands of the Mother of the Redeemer.” – Saint John Paul II read more

Readings & Reflections: Friday of the Twenty-sixth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Bruno, October 6,2017

Readings & Reflections: Friday of the Twenty-sixth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Bruno, October 6,2017

Bruno was born around the year 1035 A.D. in Cologne. Bruno had already spent twenty years in the teaching profession when he heard the call to solitude. He became a scholar in Reims, France, and then chancellor of the diocese. He came to know firsthand the corruption among his fellow clergy. In a letter to a friend, he later recalled how he chose “to abandon the fleeting shadows of this world… and lay hold of the eternal by taking the monastic habit.” A stay among the Cistercians led him to establish his own foundation, in the Charteuse Mountains of France. Two more monasteries in Italy followed. The austere surroundings, long periods of solitary silence, and almost-perpetual fasts made possible an intimate conversation with God. On the celebration of the ninth centenary of Bruno’s death in 2001, Saint John Paul observed, “At the heart of the desert, where men are tried and their faith purified, the Father leads them on a path of dispossession which questions all logic of having, being successful, and finding fleeting happiness.” read more

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Twenty-sixth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Maria Faustina Kowalska, October 5,2017

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Twenty-sixth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Maria Faustina Kowalska, October 5,2017

The intimacy with the Father that the disciples witnessed in the Lord’s eyes moved them to beg, “Teach us to pray.” They want to live a humanity that is as rich and deep as his. Christ entrusts them with the Gospel: the privilege of calling God “Father.” In hallowing his name, calling for his kingdom, and mirroring his forgiveness, they become resplendent sons. read more

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Twenty-sixth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Francis of Assisi, October 4,2017

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Twenty-sixth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Francis of Assisi, October 4,2017

Francis was born in 1182 A.D. in Assisi, Italy. Widespread heresy, scandals among the clergy, and a decline in attendance threatened the Church of Francis’ day. The son of a rich cloth merchant, Francis converted to a life of prayer in his early twenties. In a dream, God told him, “Go and repair my church, which, as you can see, is in ruins,” Francis began rebuilding the crumbling structure of San Damiano. But his great work of renewal was the new form of life he embraced in 1208 A.D. in which Christ sends his disciples forth, telling them to take “no sack for the journey, or a second tunic, or sandals, or walking stick” (Mt 10:10). Immediately, Francis went out to preach on the streets of Assisi as Christ instructed. His radical poverty and passionate preaching drew five thousand men to the Friars Minor in the next twelve years. A young Clare of Assisi came to him, too; she became the superior of the contemplative Poor Clares. At he end of his life, Francis received the stigmata, a sign of intimate union with the Savior. Francis died in 1226 A.D. in Assisi, and was canonized just two years later. read more

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Twenty-six Week in Ordinary Time & St. Theodora Guerin, October 3,2017

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Twenty-six Week in Ordinary Time & St. Theodora Guerin, October 3,2017

Jesus “resolutely determined to journey to Jerusalem” to lay down his life on the cross. We pray to be counted among those people of every nationality filled with faith who beg. “Let us go with you, for we have heard that God is with you.”

AMDG+

Opening Prayer

“Heavenly Father, keep my mind fixed on the surpassing  joys stored up for me in your kingdom.  And let me be willing to put up with all the suffering, hardship, and pain that may come my way in serving you. Lord never allow me to be vengeful against those who have hurt me. In Jesus’ Name, I pray. Amen.” read more

CHURCH MILITANT HEADLINES, OCTOBER 2, 2017

CHURCH MILITANT HEADLINES, OCTOBER 2, 2017

Get briefed on today’s top stories with Christine Niles.

October 2, 2017

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Cardinal Raymond Burke: SSPX is in Schism
Faithful Catholics are discouraged from attending liturgies or receiving sacraments. FULL STORY

NFL National Anthem Protests Backfiring
Players that kneel during anthem are booed.  FULL STORY

Steve Bannon Endorses Candidate for PA Governor
Thinks Rep. Scott Wagner will help rid the government of corruption. FULL STORY

Irish Bishop Slammed for Promoting Abstinence
Bp. Alphonsus Cullinan denounces pushing vaccine instead of chastity. FULL STORY read more

Readings & Reflections: Monday of the Twenty-sixth Week in Ordinary Time & Holy Guardian Angels, October 2,2017

Readings & Reflections: Monday of the Twenty-sixth Week in Ordinary Time & Holy Guardian Angels, October 2,2017

“Popular piety encompasses many forms of devotion to the Guardian Angels. Saint Basil the Great (+378 A.D.) taught that ‘each and every member of the faithful has a Guardian Angel to protect, guard, and guide them through life.’ This ancient teaching was consolidated by biblical and patristic sources and lies behind many forms of piety. Saint Bernard of Clairvaux (+1153 A.D.) was a great master and a notable promoter of devotion to the Guardian Angels. For him, they were a proof ‘that heaven denies us nothing that assists us,’ and hence, ‘these celestial spirits have been placed at our sides to protect us, instruct us, and to guide us.’” (Directory of Popular Piety and the Liturgy, #216). read more

Readings & Reflections: Saturday of the Twenty-fifth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Jerome, September 30,2017

Readings & Reflections: Saturday of the Twenty-fifth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Jerome, September 30,2017

A native of Italy, Jerome was educated in the Latin and Greek classics. As an adult, he received baptism and embarked on a life of solitary penance in the desert of Calchis. He is perhaps best known for his hot temper. He relished controversy and treated the friends of the Church as harshly as her critics. Under Pope Damasus, Jerome revised the then-current translation of the Bible, producing the Vulgate, the Church’s official Latin biblical text. In time of schism, he was the papacy’s dogged defender: “He who clings to the Chair of Peter is accepted by me.” In later years, Jerome founded a monastic community in the Holy Land, where he composed commentaries on the Scriptures: “I beg of you, dear brother,” he wrote to a friend, “to live among these books, to meditate upon them, to know nothing else, to seek nothing else. Does not such a life seem to you a foretaste of heaven here on earth?” He lived in a cave in Bethlehem: “He never rests, day or night,” it was observed. “He is reading or writing the whole time.” Jerome is one of the four great Latin Fathers. He died in Bethlehem in 420 A.D. read more

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Twenty-fifth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Wenceslaus, September 28,2017

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Twenty-fifth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Wenceslaus, September 28,2017

Wenceslaus’ father, Duke Ratislav, and his grandmother Ludmila were among the first Catholics of Bohemia. His mother, Drahomira, reverted to her heathen roots. Upon his father’s death, Wenceslaus’ mother had Ludmila murdered, and kindled the animosity of his brother, Boleslaus, toward Wenceslaus’ “gaze never moved from Jesus Christ” (Pope Benedict XVI). The son of the Christian duke Ratislav and a heathen mother, Wenceslaus was born around the year 907 A.D. near Prague. He was still a teenager when he wrested the throne from his mother, who was suppressing the Church. Wenceslaus invited Latin clergy into the country and promoted education in his realm. His policies drew the ire of his brother, who was complicit in Wenceslaus’ murder in 929 A.D. Wenceslaus’ status as a martyr comes from the manner of his death, at the hands of Boleslaus and his associates. When run through by the sword, he responded, “Brother, may God forgive you.” The “eternal” prince of the Czech people, Wenceslaus “had the courage to prefer the kingdom of heaven to the enticement of worldly power” (Pope Benedict XVI). In the year 2000 A.D., the Czech Republic declared September 28 Czech Statehood Day, honoring Wenceslaus, the country’s patron. read more

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Twenty-fifth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Vincent de Paul, September 27,2017

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Twenty-fifth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Vincent de Paul, September 27,2017

Vincent was born of a humble peasant family in Gascony, France in 1581 A.D. After completing his studies, he was ordained a priest when he was not quite twenty and went to Paris where he served in a parish. He found his calling in the ministry to the poor, first among the country estate of the Gondhi family and later in Paris. Eventually he came under the influence of Cardinal Pierre de Berulle, with his emphasis on the humanity of Christ, and Saint Francis de Sales, who taught of God’s tender mercy. He founded the Congregation of the Mission to supervise the formation of priests and to give support to the poor. He sent the priests of the Congregation of the Mission to bring Christ to rural populations. With the help of St. Louise de Marillac, he also founded the Congregation of the Daughters of Charity to give their lives to the care of the marginalized. In his letters, he wrote, “Strive to live content in the midst of those things that cause your discontent. Free your mind from all that troubles you, God will take care of things. You will be unable to make haste in this [choice] without, so to speak, grieving the heart of God, because he sees that you do not honor him sufficiently with holy trust. Trust in him, I beg you, and you will have the fulfillment of what your heart desires” (St. Vincent de Paul, Letters). He died in Paris in 1660 A.D. He is the patron of the parish-based Society of Saint Vincent de Paul, founded in 1883 A.D. by Frederic Ozanam. read more