Category Archives: Daily readings with reflections

Readings & Reflections: Saturday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Philip Neri, May 26,2018

Readings & Reflections: Saturday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Philip Neri, May 26,2018

Philip has been called the “Second Apostle of Rome,” after the great Saint Paul. Born in Florence, he lived for a time in his youth near Monte Cassino and drank deeply of the Benedictine life of prayer. He was ordained a priest at the age of thirty-five. By degrees, he took Rome by storm. He healed thousands in the confessional. He comforted and directed countless others. He gathered his followers for the Oratory – meetings that combined prayer and music, ending with almsgiving or pilgrimage to Rome’s basilicas. He received many mystical graces, the most telling of which was a mystical “enlargement” of his heart, which he described as being ignited with God’s own Spirit. He founded a Congregation of priests to support the work of the Oratory. Philip died in 1595 A.D. and was immediately proclaimed a saint by the Romans. read more

Readings & Reflections: Friday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Bede the Venerable, May 25,2018

Readings & Reflections: Friday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Bede the Venerable, May 25,2018

Born in 673 A.D., Bede entered the monastery of Wearmouth in northeastern England at the age of seven, became a month, and was ordained. Bede never ventured further than fifty miles from the monastery. Drawing on the many manuscripts brought to Wearmouth from France, Bede produced his Ecclesiastical History of the English People and commentaries on Scripture for the edification of his fellow monks. His works show him as learned, steeped in the Church’s liturgical prayer, and eminently Catholic. Bede’s successor, William of Malmesbury, called him “marvelously learned and not at all proud.” Bede died in 735 and was named Doctor of the Church in 1899 A.D. read more

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Mary Magdale de Pazzi, May 24,2018

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Mary Magdale de Pazzi, May 24,2018

The Lord instructs us about the kind of detachment required “to enter into the Kingdom of God.” It requires cutting off from ourselves whatever causes us to cling to our false self: worldly treasure, injustice toward others, hearts fattened by self-indulgence, etc. Such mortification makes us super attentive to those who “belong to Christ” and ever generous in their service. read more

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Gregory VII, May 23,2018

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Gregory VII, May 23,2018

The Lord stresses the simplicity of the life of faith: “There is no one who performs a mighty deed in my name who can at the same time speak ill of me.” Therefore, the most important thing in life is to take advantage of the present moment to invoke the Holy Name of Jesus. For “you have no idea what your life will be like tomorrow.”

AMDG+

Opening Prayer

Lord Jesus, You are aware of how partisan and prejudice we can be. You know how difficult it is for us to collaborate with people who do not belong to our inner group. Lord You have witnessed us douse cold water on a spiritually viable project which was espoused by a group that does not share our vision and mission. Lord bless us with your Wisdom and the gifts of knowledge and an understanding of justice as we encounter those who do not share our beliefs. Lord include them as akin to us in the desire to follow God and live in His image. In your Name, we pray. Amen. read more

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Rita of Cascia, May 22,2018

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Rita of Cascia, May 22,2018

Born in 1381 A.D. of peasant stock in Roccaporena, Italy, Rita desired to remain a virgin from her youth, but her parents insisted that she marry. The husband they chose proved to be a man of violent temper. Rita courageously abided his cruelty. When her husband was the victim of a politically motivated murder, Rita’s sons vowed to avenge his death. Rita prayed that this might be prevented, and both sons died of natural causes before they could act. Afterward, Rita entered the Augustinian convent of Saint Mary Magdalene in Cascia, taking the veil in 1413. Rita gave herself over to prayer and mortification in reparation for the sufferings of Christ. She received a mystical wound in her forehead as though from a crown of thorns. Rita died of tuberculosis in 1457 A.D. “If we ask Saint Rita for the secret to the extraordinary work of social and spiritual renewal, she replies: fidelity to the Love that was crucified. Rita, with Christ and like Christ, goes to the cross always and only through love” (Saint John Paul II). read more

Readings & Reflections: Monday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Christopher Magallanes and Companions, May 21,2018

Readings & Reflections: Monday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time & St. Christopher Magallanes and Companions, May 21,2018

The Mexican Constitution implemented in 1926 outlawed any public worship outside a church, closed Catholic schools, denied the Church’s rights to hold property, and made it a crime to dress in clerical garb. With the cry of “Long Live Christ the King and the Virgin of Guadalupe!” a three-year protest began against the revolutionary government. Mexican soldiers were charged with putting down the Catholic peasants, the Cristeros. Thousands were slaughtered. The twenty-five celebrated today were priests and laymen, preaching and teaching in rural areas. They never took up arms. One by one, there abducted, tortured, and killed, the first in 1915 and the last in 1937. Christopher Magallanes and twenty-four others were murdered in Mexico from 1915 to 1937, most during the Cristero uprising. This revolt pitted Catholic peasants against the violently anti-clerical Mexican government. The Cristeros sometimes took up arms, but each of these men, in obedience to the Mexican bishops, refused to fight. To a man, they humbly accepted death, praising God and blessing their executioners. “I am innocent and I die innocent. I forgive with all my heart those responsible for my death, and I ask God that the shedding of my blood may serve to bring peace to divided Mexicans” were Magallanes’ final words. read more

Readings & Reflections with Cardinal Tagle’s video: Pentecost Sunday B & St. Bernardine of Siena, May 20,2018

Readings & Reflections with Cardinal Tagle’s video: Pentecost Sunday B & St. Bernardine of Siena, May 20,2018

By the outpouring of the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost, Christ’s Paschal Mystery was brought to its completion. The Holy Spirit prepares us with his grace in order to draw us to Christ. He manifests the risen Lord to us, opening our minds. He makes present the mystery of Christ. And he reconciles us, bringing us into communion with God. Saint Thomas Aquinas says that the Holy Spirit interiorly perfects our spirit, communicating to it a new dynamism so that it refrains from evil for love. With the Holy Spirit within us, “it is quite natural for people who had been absorbed by the things of this world to become entirely otherworldly in outlook, and for cowards to become people of great courage” (St. Cyril of Alexandria). read more

Readings & Reflections: Saturday of the Seventh Week of Easter & St. Theophilus of Corte, May 19,2018

Readings & Reflections: Saturday of the Seventh Week of Easter & St. Theophilus of Corte, May 19,2018

Today’s readings reveal yet another integral link between the holy Apostles Peter and Paul. Jesus tells Peter that his only true “concern” is this: “You follow me.” Paul as well witnesses to such supreme following: In his chains he received all who came to him, proclaiming Jesus Christ “with complete assurance.”

AMDG+

Opening Prayer
“May the power of your love, Lord Christ, fiery and sweet as honey, so absorb our hearts as to withdraw them from all that is under heaven. Grant that we may be ready to die for love of your love, as you died for love of our love.” Amen. (Prayer of Francis of Assisi, 1182-1226) read more

Readings & Reflections: Friday of the Seventh Week of Easter & St. John I, May 18,2018

Readings & Reflections: Friday of the Seventh Week of Easter & St. John I, May 18,2018

Elected when he was already advanced in years, to succeed Saint Hormisdas in the see of Peter, John I suffered in his own body for the sake of the peace between the powers of East and West. At the request of the Ostrogoth King Theodoric the Great, then ruler of Rome, John went to Constantinople to end the brutal persecution of the Byzantine emperor, Justin I. John secured charity toward the Arians, but, upon his return to Italy, was imprisoned by order of Theodoric. John died on May 18, 526 A.D., of starvation and exhaustion. He was buried in Rome as a “victim for Christ.” read more

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Seventh Week of Easter & St. Paschal Baylon, May 17,2018

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Seventh Week of Easter & St. Paschal Baylon, May 17,2018

The night before he dies, Jesus prays for those who will believe his disciples’ word. That is why the Lord stands by the valiant Paul, saying, “Take courage.” The “glory” that Jesus has given us is the confidence to depend on him no matter how harrowing the circumstances or the struggle of life. The certainty and witness of Christians who suffer win us to Christ. read more