Category Archives: Daily readings with reflections

Readings & Reflections: Friday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Lorenzo Ruiz & Companions, September 22,2017

Readings & Reflections: Friday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Lorenzo Ruiz & Companions, September 22,2017

Lorenzo was born in Manila of a Chinese father and a Filipino mother, both Christians. Thus he learned Chinese and Tagalog from them and Spanish from the Dominicans whom he served as altar boy and sacristan. He was a full member of the Confraternity of the Holy Rosary under Dominican auspices. He married and had two sons and a daughter.

Jesus was accompanied in his journeys by the Twelve “and some women who had been cured of evil spirits and infirmities.” The “presence of many witnesses” makes it possible for us to “pursue righteousness, devotion, faith, love.” The communion we share in faith rescues us from “foolish and harmful desires” help us “lay hold of eternal life.” read more

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time & Sts. Andrew Kim Taegon, Paul Chong Ha-sang & Companions, September 20,2017

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time & Sts. Andrew Kim Taegon, Paul Chong Ha-sang & Companions, September 20,2017

Unique among the national churches, the Church in Korea arose not through the efforts of outside missionaries but rather through the determination of Korean laypersons. Yi Seung-hun was the first to be baptized, in 1784 A.D. in Beijing. Returning to Korea with rosaries, statues, and catechisms, he evangelized his brethren. The martyrs remembered today were among the second and third generation of Catholics. “The blood of the martyrs is the seed of the Church.” In 19th century Korea, this adage of Tertullian was confirmed anew. Both of the saints for whom today’s feast is named were the sons of martyrs. Paul Chong Ha-sang spent his life in the perilous work of trying to bring missionaries into Korea. Andrew Kim Tae-gon, the first native priest of Korea, entered the country after his ordination in Shanghai, and brought the Eucharist, much longed-for, to his Korean brethren. He served but a year before he was arrested. “My eternal life is beginning now,” he proclaimed in his last sermon, just before he was beheaded. They and their 101 companion martyrs were canonized by Pope John Paul II in 1984. read more

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Januarius, September 19,2017

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Januarius, September 19,2017

The martyrdom of Januarius is well attested by ancient authorities. The earliest testimony about Januarius is the record of the priest Uranius, who, in 432 A.D. wrote of the miraculous appearance of Januarius, “bishop and martyr and glory of the church of Naples,” to Saint Paulinus of Nola on his deathbed. According to traditions, Januarius was a bishop of Benevento in Italy, received word that the deacons Sossus and Proclus and the laymen Euticius and Acutius were imprisoned under the brutal emperor Diocletian. Januarius prepared to visit the men in prison. The Romans arrested Januarius with his companions Festus and Desiderius on their way to perform this work of mercy. All seven men were sentenced to death and exposed to wild beasts. When the beasts refused to attack them, the men were beheaded in the year 305 A.D. Since 1389 A.D., a vial of his solidified blood housed in Naples is said to liquefy miraculously when brought out for veneration on the saint’s three feast days. This much-studied occurrence continues to defy full scientific explanation. His relics were brought to Naples, which lies in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius, an active volcano. When Mount Vesuvius erupted in 1631 A.D., prayers to the saint are believed to have protected the city from destruction. Over the centuries, the phenomenon has moved the hearts of countless visitors to Naples, notably Blessed John Henry Newman and Saint Alphonsus Liguori. read more

Readings & Reflections: Monday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Joseph of Cupertino, September 18,2017

Readings & Reflections: Monday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time & St. Joseph of Cupertino, September 18,2017

Saint Paul asks “that supplications, prayers, petitions, and thanksgiving be offered for everyone.” All prayer, in effect, mirrors the actions of the elders who “approached Jesus and strongly urged him to come.” Even though the centurion is never face to face with Jesus, he grows from faith to greater faith. Lord Jesus, say the word. Make happen the healing that I need to live. read more

Readings & Reflections with Cardinal Tagle’s Video: Twenty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time A & St. Robert Bellarmine, September 17,2017

Readings & Reflections with Cardinal Tagle’s Video: Twenty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time A & St. Robert Bellarmine, September 17,2017

With a vengeance, the forgiven servant says to his debtor fellow servant, “Pay back what you owe.” I so doing, the ingrate refuses “mercy to another like himself.” However, “the vengeful will suffer the Lord’s vengeance, for he remembers their sins in detail.” And that is the one thing we hope with all our heart that God will forget. The “math” of mercy is very simple: “Forgive your neighbor’s injustice; then your own sins will be forgiven.” How else dare we “expect healing from the Lord.?” Thus, “none of us” is to “live for oneself”; rather, “we live for the Lord” and by the Lord: the “Lord of both the dead and the living” will endow us with the power to forgive others as he himself does. read more

Readings & Reflections: Saturday of the Twenty-third Week in Ordinary Time & Sts. Cornelius and Cyprian, September 16,2017

Readings & Reflections: Saturday of the Twenty-third Week in Ordinary Time & Sts. Cornelius and Cyprian, September 16,2017

Cornelius and Cyprian have shared this feast since ancient times. His successor Fabian having perished in the brutal Dioclesian persecution, Cornelius was elected bishop of Rome in 251 A.D. with the almost certain knowledge that he would die a martyr’s death. In 252 A.D., the plague entered Rome, and the Romans blamed the disease and resulting pestilence on the Christians. As punishment, Cornelius was exiled to Civitavecchia. Letters of support and appreciation came to him from Cyprian who had been elected bishop of Carthage in North Africa in 248 A.D., Cyprian supported Cornelius, consistently urging the unity of the Church in his many pastoral letters. “No one can have God as his Father who does not have the Church as his Mother,” he wrote. Cornelius was martyred in 253 A.D. Cyprian was martyred in Carthage in 258 A.D. Their prayers are still invoked in the canon of the Mass. read more

Readings & Reflections: Memorial of Our Lady of Sorrows, September 15,2017

Readings & Reflections: Memorial of Our Lady of Sorrows, September 15,2017

The Blessed Virgin was born to be the Mother of God. From the first moment of Mary’s immaculate presence in her mother’s womb, Our Lady has led us to her Son. From the cross, Christ commands, “Behold, your mother.” As the Savior’s dying gift to us, Jesus leads us back to Mary. For we need the maternal closeness of the Sorrowful Mother to sustain us when overcome by the terrifying trials of life. Through Mary’s compassionate presence at the cross, that event – as it recurs in our life – become more deeply human, filling us with the courage to face life’s sufferings, certain in the secure embrace of divine providence. Whenever Mary loves us, she gives us Jesus. By obeying the Lord in our devout beholding of the Mother of God, we give Mary the chance to speak her Yes to the “annunciation” uttered from the cross: “Behold, your son.” read more

Yes, Pope Francis, President Trump IS Pro-Life

Yes, Pope Francis, President Trump IS Pro-Life

By | September 13, 2017

It saddens me that Pope Francis refuses to recognize the pro-life intentions and actions of President Trump. The president has made good on his promises to pro-life voters, starting on his first day in office with his restoration of the Mexico City Policy, which he later expanded. Federal funds can no longer pay for abortions overseas. And there is more, not the least of which is the presence of Justice Neil Gorsuch on the U.S. Supreme Court.

But rather than applauding the president’s actions, Pope Francis has attempted to co-opt the meaning of “pro-life” to include his preferred immigration policies. Speaking to reporters on his flight back to Rome from Colombia, the pope was asked about the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA), which the president had ordered phased out in six months. “I hope they rethink it a bit,” the pontiff said, “Because I heard the U.S. president speak: He presents himself as a person who is pro-life.” read more

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Twenty-third Week in Ordinary Time & St. John Chrysostom, September 13,2017

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Twenty-third Week in Ordinary Time & St. John Chrysostom, September 13,2017

John was born in Antioch in 349 A.D., where he received a fine education and spent a period of time in uninterrupted contemplation of the Word of God as a hermit. But he found his true calling as a priest in Antioch and served eleven years as a priest before he was raised to the episcopate in Constantinople – a center of wealth, power and political intrigue. John preached Christ to rich and poor alike. After he censured the Empress Eudoxia for scandalous public behavior, he was banished to Armenia. From exile he wrote letters of comfort to his friends. “All things will certainly turn out, whether in this life or the life to come. In every circumstance, yield to the incomprehensibility of God’s providence.” According to Pope Benedict XVI, John’s perfectly pastoral theology” addressed everyday problems on marriage and family life spoke to issues that husbands and wives face, then as now, “There is nothing which so welds our life together as the love of man and wife,” he wrote. John died in exile in 407 A.D. at Comana in Pontus. In 1568 A.D. he was declared a Doctor of the Church. read more

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Twenty-third Week in Ordinary Time & Holy Name of the Blessed Virgin Mary, September 12,2017

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Twenty-third Week in Ordinary Time & Holy Name of the Blessed Virgin Mary, September 12,2017

Our salvation begins when an archangel speaks the name of Mary. To be Christian is to cry on that Annunciation unceasingly. Saint Louis de Montfort wrote that “the salvation of each individual is bound up with the Hail Mary.” This prayer that names the holy name of the Mother of God “brought to a dry and barren world the Fruit of Life. It will cause the Word of God to take root in the soul and bring forth Jesus.” The holy name of Mary bears such power because of the unique bond between Mother and Son. “When God sent his Son born of a woman, he instituted a once and for all order of salvation in which the union of Mother and Child stands at the center” (Romanus Cessario, O.P.). To accept the divine privilege of speaking the name of Mary is to participate in that saving union. read more