Category Archives: Bible Stories

Scripture Speaks: Trinity Sunday

Scripture Speaks: Trinity Sunday

On this first Sunday after Pentecost, the Church calls us to remember the Most Holy Trinity.  Why is this perfect timing?

Gospel (Read Jn 3:16-18)

Today’s Gospel is different from any we have seen during the long seasons of Lent and Easter.  On Sunday after Sunday, the Gospels have reported actions of Jesus.  They have been passages full of conversations and events that moved His story along, culminating in His Ascension into Heaven and His promise to send the Holy Spirit.  Today, however, St. John gives us a kind of summary of this.  It is simple, but what a sweep it has!  Read the first verse carefully so as not to miss its impact through familiarity:  “God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, so that everyone who believes in Him might not perish but might have eternal life.”  If we understand the scope of this statement, we will know why it is perfectly fitting that today is Trinity Sunday. read more

SOLA SCRIPTURA: A LONELY, MAN-MADE HERESY

SOLA SCRIPTURA: A LONELY, MAN-MADE HERESY


by Church Militant  •  ChurchMilitant.com  •  May 22, 2017

This notion contradicts the words of St. Paul, St. John and Christ Himself

By Peter Holm

Sola Scriptura, the protestant claim that each man alone may interpret Scripture for himself, isn’t in the Bible (which wasn’t assembled by the Church until 393). The notion of “Scripture Alone” presumes that the Holy Scripture alone, less context, carries the full truth of God to the hearts of the Christian faithful. Worse, this philosophy directly contradicts the words of St. Paul, St. John and even Christ Jesus Himself. read more

Six Things People Get Wrong About the Resurrection of Jesus

Six Things People Get Wrong About the Resurrection of Jesus

<i>Resurrection of Christ</i> by Carl Bloch

Resurrection of Christ by Carl Bloch (Public domain) COMMENTARY: Christianity without a risen Christ — truly alive and with a real, glorified body — is an essentially empty, even false, belief system. By Carl E. Olson, April 17,2017

When the apostle Paul told the Corinthians that the message of Christ crucified is “a stumbling block to Jews and folly to Gentiles” (1 Corinthians 1:23), he surely recognized the same was equally true of the message of Christ risen from the dead. Later in the same epistle, after all, he declares, “If Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is in vain and your faith is in vain” and explains that if “Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins” (15:14, 17). read more

The Prayer of Jesus in Gethsemane in the Monothelite Controversy

The Prayer of Jesus in Gethsemane in the Monothelite Controversy

APRIL 8, 2017 BY

Gethsemane by Adriaen van de Velde, 1665

In this article, originally published in French in the Actes du Symposium sur Maxime le Confesseur (1982), François-Marie Léthel shows how the prayer of Jesus in Gethsemane factored into the monothelite controversy. Léthel first focuses on the monothelite interpretation of Christ’s apparent refusal of the Chalice, and the monothelite idea of opposition. Léthel argues that this opposition can only occur in Christ on an infra-moral level. Then he focuses on the interpretation by Maximus the Confessor of the acceptance of the Chalice and how it demonstrates not only two wills in Christ, but two wills acting in complete harmony (συμφυΐα). read more

The Case for Jesus: C.S. Lewis vs. Bart Ehrman by Dr. Brant Pitre (Part 1 to 5)

The Case for Jesus: C.S. Lewis vs. Bart Ehrman by Dr. Brant Pitre (Part 1 of 5)

by Brant Pitre April 25, 2016


Watch Part 2 >

In this video, which is 1 of 5 introductory videos to The Case for Jesus: The Reliability of the Gospels and the Jewish Roots of Jesus’ Divinity, Dr. Brant Pitre sets the stage for what will follow in the upcoming videos. In this video, Dr. Pitre juxtaposes C.S. Lewis’ famous trilemma argument (Liar, Lunatic, or Lord) about Jesus being divine to Dr. Bart Ehrman’s position that Jesus is not divine in the all four Gospels. In Lewis’ famous argument, he assumes that what the Gospels tell us is actually reliable. However, this assumption is something that has been questioned in recent years, heralded by Ehrman as one of the more notable proponents of this form of skepticism. read more

Apostolic Succession as Seen in the Jerusalem Council

Apostolic Succession as Seen in the Jerusalem CouncilSaint Matthias, from ‘Christ and the Apostles’, Friedrich Herlin, 1499
Saint Matthias, from ‘Christ and the Apostles’, Friedrich Herlin, 1499 Apostolic Succession as Seen in the Jerusalem Council Here is a compelling biblical argument for an infallible Church, and against sola Scriptura. By Dave Armstrong, January 15,2017

The standard Catholic apologetics argument from the Bible for apostolic succession is the selection of Matthias to succeed Judas (Acts 1:16-26). That includes taking note that the word for “office” in 1:20 is episkopos: the word for “bishop.” Thus, we have some sort of equation of apostles and bishops, which is necessary, for we believe that bishops are indeed the successors of (but not identical to) the apostles.

This very day, in dialogue with a Protestant on Facebook, I stumbled upon a “new” argument for succession from Scripture that had never occurred to me before in my 26 years of doing Catholic apologetics (I love when that happens!). I put “new” in quotes because I’m sure someone else has thought of this (“nothing new under the sun”), but for me it’s new, and I did come up with it on my own, even if others have taught it in the past. Dialogue and its intellectual challenge has a way of bringing about such wonderful discoveries. read more

The 7 Weirdest Bible Stories They Didn’t Teach You in Sunday School

The 7 Weirdest Bible Stories They Didn’t Teach You in Sunday School

They might not come up in Sunday school, but they’re in there.

You’ve probably heard of Adam and Eve, Noah and the ark, and of course Jesus. But the Bible is a big book, and there’s lot more in there than just those popular stories. There’s also magic fish, giants, and a prophet who was apparently really sensitive about being bald.

But then again, the Bible is the inspired Word of the almighty and ineffable God, so maybe we shouldn’t be so surprised that things seem a bit strange at times. read more

Why Do Catholics And Protestants Have Different 10 Commandments?

Why Do Catholics And Protestants Have Different 10 Commandments?

When listing the 10 Commandments, Catholics and Protestants have slight differences. While very similar, the difference is instantly noticeable. And even though both listings have solid biblical support, some Protestants use the difference as an opportunity to accuse the Catholic Church of changing the 10 Commandments to support their “idolatrous worshipping of statues”.

Here are the 10 Commandments as numbered by Catholics and Protestants: 

The Traditional Catholic Listing: 

1. I am the Lord your God: You shall not have strange Gods before me. 

2. You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain.  read more

50 Biblical Evidences for the Holy Trinity

50 Biblical Evidences for the Holy Trinity (Cuzco School, “The Enthroned Trinity” (c. 1730)) BY DAVE ARMSTRONG,  NOV. 14, 2016 In the Holy Bible, we find indications of the Most Blessed Trinity at every turn.

Briefly put, the Holy Trinity is the belief that the one God subsists in Three Persons: God the Father, God the Son, Jesus (Who took on flesh in the incarnation and became Man), and God the Holy Spirit. They are all God, with the same divine attributes, yet are in relationship with each other as Subject and Object.

It is ultimately a deep mystery, because we can’t fully comprehend how three can be one. It seems to go against logic. Yet the Bible plainly teaches it, with many and varied proofs, and so we must accept the revealed doctrine in faith, bowing to the fact that God’s thoughts are much higher than ours (Is 55:9). read more

Five “UnBiblical Traditions” of Protestants

Five “UnBiblical Traditions” of Protestants BY ARNOLD SCOTT, 10/27/2016 3:00:10 PM Five "UnBiblical Traditions" of Protestants Photo Credit: Flickr/alex.ch

Most Protestants, especially those who would identify as Bible Christians or go by Sola Scriptura, like to say that they follow the authority of God’s word in Scripture and anything else is unreliable and lacks any authority. In particular, they would criticize “unbiblical traditions” that are followed by others, including Catholics, and that do not have explicit support in Scripture, according to their view.

So it is somewhat ironic that these very same people follow several traditions not found explicitly in Scripture…and hold them as BINDING doctrine, not merely interpretations or optional customs. read more