Pope Francis: “God does not consider anyone permanently lost”

Pope Francis: “God does not consider anyone permanently lost”

Published on May 4, 2016

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May 4, 2016. He asks those living “closed, because they feel righteous” to come out looking for those in need.

The Pope’s general audience: “To ‘have’ God, we must follow him to the lost sheep”

Published on May 4, 2016

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May 4, 2016. The Pope’s general audience: “To ‘have’ God, we must follow him to the lost sheep”

Pope Urges Dialogue: Says ‘A Child Can Do It’

Before General Audience Francis Meets Participants of Meeting With “Royal Institute for Interfaith Studies” in Amman, Jordan

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L’Osservatore Romano

If you want friendship, you have to start with dialogue.

Before his Wednesday General Audience this morning, Pope Francis underscored this to participants of the meeting with the “Royal Institute for Interfaith Studies” in Amman, Jordan, organized by the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, in the Vatican’s Paul VI Hall.

Francis began his visit by saying what fond memories he has of visit to Jordan, and applauded the group’s efforts to advance interreligious dialogue.

“The work you do is a work of construction,” the Pope said, lamenting, “We live in a time when we have become accustomed to destruction that makes war.”

In order to build and construct, the Pope urged, there must be dialogue and approaching one another.

“And dialogue is coming out of one’s self, with words, and listening to the words of the other. The two words come together, the two thoughts meet. It is the first step of a journey.”

So Simple Children Can Do It

The Pontiff went on to explain that once there’s dialogue, hearts meet, hands are shaken and friendship follows.

“Word, heart, hands. It is simple! A child can do it … Why can’t we?”

The Pope reminded the participants, “We all have a common Father, we are brothers,” and concluded, thanking them for their presence and asking them to pray for him.

***

Full Translation:

On ZENIT’s Web page: https://zenit.org/articles/popes-address-to-royal-institute-for-interfaith-studies/

Pope at General Audience: Lord Doesn’t Weigh 99-1 Ratio of Sheep. He Seeks

Reminds Faithful in St. Peter’s Square That Christians Cannot Be Closed In on Themselves

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L’Osservatore Romano – PHOTO.VA

If I still have 99 of my sheep, but one has wandered off, what does it matter? Well, to the Good Shepherd, it matters a lot.

Pope Francis explained this during his weekly General Audience this morning in St. Peter’s Square, as he continued his catechesis for the Holy Year of Mercy, turning to Jesus’ parable of the Good Shepherd.

The Pope recalled how the Lord uses the image of the shepherd who leaves His flock to go in search of one lost sheep to express God’s closeness to sinners, and underscored that God does not want even one single person to be lost.

“The Lord, in His infinite mercy,” the Argentine Pope said, “is always ready to meet us wherever we are.” He also wants us to follow his example, Francis added, by seeking those who need God’s mercy and have gone astray.

God Doesn’t Weigh the Matter

“He could reason in this way,” Francis said, “’I weigh the matter: I have ninety-nine, I have lost one, but it is no great loss. Instead, He goes to seek it because each one is very important for him, and that one is the neediest, the most abandoned, the most discarded, and He goes to find it.”

God acts toward sinners with mercy, Francis said, stressing, “Nothing and no one will be able to deter Him from His will of salvation.”

“God,” the Pope pointed out, “does not know our present throwaway culture. God has nothing to do with this.”

“God does not discard any person. God loves all, He seeks everyone, one by one! He does not know the word “discard the people,” because He is all love and all mercy.”

While He looks for the lost sheep, He incites the ninety-nine to participate in the reunification of the flock. Then, not only the sheep carried on the shoulders but the whole flock will follow the shepherd to his home, to celebrate with “friends and neighbors.”

Don’t Stink

We must reflect often on this parable because there is always someone in the Christian community who is missing and has gone away and left his place empty. Sometimes this is discouraging and leads us to believe that it is an inevitable loss, a sickness without remedy.

It is then that we run the danger of shutting ourselves in a sheepfold, where there will not be the smell of the sheep but the stink of the closed! And Christians… We must not be closed, because we will have the stink of closed things. Never!”

The Holy Father urged all Christians to go out and not be closed in themselves, within their small communities or parishes, considering themselves “right.” This happens, the Pope lamented, when the missionary impetus which leads us to meet others is lacking.

No Definitively Lost Sheep

However, Francis explained, in Jesus’ vision, there are no “definitively lost” sheep, but only sheep to be found again.

“We must understand this well: no one, for God, is definitively lost. Never! God seeks us up to the last moment. Think of the good thief; but only in Jesus’ vision no one is definitively lost.”

“No distance,” the Pope said, “can keep the shepherd far away, and no flock can renounce a brother. To find one who is lost is the joy of the shepherd and of God, but it is also the joy of the whole flock!”

Pope Francis concluded, reminding the pilgrims that we are all sheep, that have been found again and gathered by the Lord’s mercy, and are “called to gather the whole flock together with Him.”

***

On ZENIT’s Web page:

Full Translation: https://zenit.org/articles/general-audience-on-the-parable-of-the-good-shepherd/

GENERAL AUDIENCE: On the Parable of the Good Shepherd

‘God seeks us up to the last moment’

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Here is a ZENIT translation of the address Pope Francis gave during this morning’s general audience in St. Peter’s Square.

__

Dear Brothers and Sisters, good morning!

We all know the image of the Good Shepherd, who carries the lost sheep on His shoulders. This icon has always represented Jesus’ solicitude towards sinners and the mercy of God, who is not resigned to lose anyone. Jesus narrates the parable to make us understand that His closeness to sinners should not scandalize but, on the contrary, should spur in everyone a serious reflection on the way we live our faith. The narration sees, on one hand, the sinners that approach Jesus to hear Him and, on the other, the suspicious Doctors of the Law and the scribes who move away from Him because of His behavior. They move away because Jesus approaches the sinners. They were proud, they were arrogant; they considered themselves just.

Our parable unfolds around three figures: the shepherd, the lost sheep and the rest of the flock. However, the only one who acts is the shepherd, not the sheep. Hence, the shepherd is the only true protagonist and everything depends on him. A question introduces the parable. “What man among you having a hundred sheep and losing one of them would not leave the ninety-nine in the desert and go after the lost one until he finds it?”(Luke 15:4). It is a paradox that induces to doubt the action of the shepherd: is it wise to abandon the ninety-nine for one sheep and, what is more, not in the safety of the sheepfold, but in the desert? According to the biblical tradition, the desert is a place of death where it is difficult to find food and water, without shelter and at the mercy of wild beasts and robbers. What can ninety-nine vulnerable sheep do? The paradox continues nevertheless, saying that, having found the sheep, the shepherd “lays it on his shoulders, rejoicing, and, upon his arrival home, he calls together his friends and neighbors and says to them, ‘Rejoice with me because I have found my lost sheep.’ (v. 6). It seems, therefore, that the shepherd does not go back to the desert to recuperate the whole flock! Inclined to the one sheep, he seems to forget the other ninety-nine. But in reality, it is not so. The teaching Jesus wishes to give us is, rather, that no sheep can be lost. The Lord cannot be resigned to the fact that even one person alone can be lost. God’s action is that of one who goes in search of his lost children to then celebrate and enjoy with all finding them again. It is an unstoppable desire: not even ninety-nine sheep can stop the shepherd and keep him closed in the sheepfold. He could reason thus: “I weigh the matter: I have ninety-nine, I have lost one, but it is no great loss.” Instead, he goes to seek it because each one is very important for him, and that one is the neediest, the most abandoned, the most discarded, and he goes to find it. We are all advised: the style with which God acts is mercy towards sinners and He is absolutely faithful to this mercy: nothing and no one will be able to deter Him from His will of salvation. God does not know our present throwaway culture. God has nothing to do with this. God does not discard any person. God loves all, He seeks all, one by one! He does not know the word ”discard the people,” because He is all love and all mercy.

The Lord’s flock is always on the way: it does not possess the Lord. We cannot delude ourselves, imprisoning Him in our schemes and our strategies. The shepherd will be found there where the lost sheep is. Therefore, the Lord is to be sought where He wishes to meet us, not where we presume to find Him! In no other way will the flock come together again other than by following the way traced by the shepherd’s mercy. While he looks for the lost sheep, he incites the ninety-nine to participate in the reunification of the flock. Then, not only the sheep carried on the shoulders, but the whole flock will follow the shepherd to his home, to celebrate with “friends and neighbors.”

We must reflect often on this parable, because there is always some one in the Christian community who is missing and has gone away and left his place empty. Sometimes this is discouraging and leads us to believe that it is an inevitable loss, a sickness without remedy. It is then that we run the danger of shutting ourselves in a sheepfold, where there will not be the smell of the sheep, but the stink of the closed! And Christians? We must not be closed, because we will have the stink of closed things. Never! It is necessary to go out and not to be closed in on ourselves, in small communities, in the parish, considering ourselves “the just.” This happens when the missionary impetus is lacking, which leads us to encounter others. In Jesus’ vision, there are no definitively lost sheep, but only sheep to be found again. We must understand this well: no one, for God, is definitively lost. Never! God seeks us up to the last moment. Think of the good thief; but only in Jesus’ vision no one is definitively lost. The perspective, therefore, is altogether dynamic, open, stimulating and creative. It drives us to go out in search, to undertake a path of fraternity. No distance can keep the shepherd far away, and no flock can renounce a brother. To find one who is lost is the joy of the shepherd and of God, but it is also the joy of the whole flock! We are all sheep that have been found again and gathered by the Lord’s mercy, called to gather the whole flock together with Him!

[Original text: Italian] [Translation by ZENIT]Greeting in Italian

Dear Italian-speaking pilgrims: welcome!

I am happy to receive the pilgrimage of the diocese of Savona-Noli with the Bishop, Monsignor Vittorio Lupi; the detained and families of “Our Lady of the Rock” project of Lecce and the Knights of Saint Timothy of Termoli, accompanied by the Bishop, Monsignor Gianfranco De Luca. I greet the Associations, the parish and school groups, in particular the students of the Nicolo Braucci Lyceum of Caivano. I hope your Jubilee pilgrimage is rich in copious spiritual fruits so that, by crossing the Holy Door with faith, you obtain the Indulgence for yourselves, for your dear ones and for your deceased.

A special greeting goes to young people, the sick and newlyweds. The month of May is dedicated to Our Lady. Dear young people, cultivate devotion to the Mother of God with the daily recitation of the Rosary; dear sick, feel the closeness of Mary of Nazareth, especially in the hour of the cross, and you, dear newlyweds, pray to her so that love and mutual respect will never be lacking in your home.

[Original text: Italian] [Translation by ZENIT]

English Summary of Pope’s General Audience

‘In His infinite mercy, He is always ready to meet us wherever we are’

Pope at Audience CTV

CTV Pope – General Audience

Here is the English-language summary of Pope Francis’ General Audience this morning in St. Peter’s Square:

***

Speaker: In our continuing catechesis for this Holy Year of Mercy, we now turn to Jesus’ parable of the Good Shepherd. The Lord uses the image of the shepherd who leaves his flock to go in search of one lost sheep to express God’s closeness to sinners. God does not want even a single person to be lost. In his infinite mercy, he is always ready to meet us wherever we are. The example of the Good Shepherd also challenges us to go out in search of those in particular need of God’s mercy, especially those who have gone astray. Jesus teaches us that in his eyes there are no lost sheep, but only sheep needing to be found. The joy which the Good Shepherd feels must also be the joy of the entire flock. For all of us are lost sheep who were found by the Lord’s mercy. All of us are called to rejoice in his merciful love, to bring that love to others and thus to join him in gathering into the fold all those whom he wishes to save.

Speaker: I greet the English-speaking pilgrims and visitors taking part in today’s Audience, particularly those from England, Scotland, Ireland, South Africa, Australia, China, Indonesia, Singapore, Hong Kong, the Philippines, the Seychelles, Canada and the United States of America. In the joy of the Risen Lord, I invoke upon you and your families the loving mercy of God our Father. May the Lord bless you all!

Pope Recalls May Being Mary’s Month During General Audience

Francis Reminds Faithful They Are ‘in Good Hands’

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WIKIMEDIA COMMONS – Jeffrey Bruno

During his weekly General Audience this morning in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis reminded the faithful that we are now entering the month of Mary: May.

While greeting the young, sick, and newlyweds at the conclusion of the audience, Francis recalled, “The month of May is dedicated to the Madonna.”

“Dear young friends, cultivate devotion to the Mother of God with daily recitation of the Rosary; dear sick people, feel the closeness of Mary of Nazareth especially at the hour of the Cross, and you, dear newlyweds, pray to her so that you never lack love and mutual respect in your home.”

You Are in Good Hands

During his greetings, he also said, “Brothers and friends, you are in good hands, you’re in the hands of the Virgin Mary.”

“She will protect you,” he said.

The Holy Father also recalled that in Poland, faithful recently celebrated the Blessed Virgin Mary, Queen of Poland.

“The offertory of the Mass of this feast,” he noted, “reminds us that God has given to your nation in the Virgin Mary a wonderful help and protection, so that, thanks to her intercession, the faith continues to be enjoyed freely and your country grows in peace.

THE DOWNLOAD: THE NEW DRUG – The secular world is acknowledging the harms of pornography

THE DOWNLOAD: THE NEW DRUG – The secular world is acknowledging the harms of pornography

The Download—The New Drug

by Christine Niles, M.St. (Oxon.), J.D.  •  ChurchMilitant.com  •  May 4, 2016

The secular world is acknowledging the harms of pornography

On March 10, the Utah House of Representatives unanimously passed a resolution declaring pornography a public health crisis. The next month, the Washington Post published an exposé on the harms of pornography, backed with social and scientific evidence. And an organization calledFight the New Drug is devoting itself entirely to educating society about the negative effects of porn, and is supported by a surprising list of Hollywood A-listers.

Aside from their opposition to porn, what do these initiatives have in common? They are all secular in nature, and reveal the increasing awareness from the non-religious world that porn, indeed, harms the individual, the family and society.

Celebrities like Hugh Grant, Terry Crews, Joseph-Gordon Leavitt and Russell Brand have spoken out publicly against porn. Hugh Grant, for instance, admits he was once a porn addict, but in a recent interview, he confessed proudly he hadn’t looked at it in three years. The interviewer asked if his life had improved since then. “I now have three children,” Grant replied. “I think there is a correlation.”

Terry Crews, who has written a book titled “Manhood” in which he discusses his past addiction to pornography, explained on a talk show how his addiction damaged his marriage.

Pornography is an intimacy killer. It just started building up a wall. A lot of people get divorced and they don’t even understand how the separation began. It wasn’t that she caught me. She was like, “Something is wrong with you,” and I finally had to admit it was a problem. … I realized I couldn’t stop.

And Russell Brand, the famous British media personality, published a YouTube rant against porn that went viral, garnering 2.6 million views. “Our attitudes towards sex have become warped and perverted and have deviated from its true function,” Brand says, “which is an expression of love and a means for procreation.”

He continues, “I feel like if I had total dominion over myself, I would never look at pornography again. … I would kick it out of my life.”

Watch the panel discuss the effects of porn in “The Download—The New Drug.”

Read the source and comments: http://www.churchmilitant.com/news/article/the-downloadthe-new-drug

Christine Niles is a staff writer, producer and anchor for ChurchMilitant.com Follow Christine on Twitter: @ChristineNiles1

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What should I do with my life?

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Ten Keys How to Teach Chastity

“The object, the intention, and the circumstances make up the three “sources” of the morality of human acts. The object chosen morally specifies the act of willing accordingly as reason recognizes and judges it good or evil. “An evil action cannot be justified by reference to a good intention”(St. Thomas Aquinas). The end does not justify the means. A morally good act requires the goodness of its object, of its end, and of its circumstances together. There are concrete acts that it is always wrong to choose, because their choice entails a disorder of the will, i.e. a moral evil. One may not do evil so that good may result from it” (CCC: 1757-1761).

What are the principal sins against chastity?

Grave sins against chastity differ according to their object: adultery, masturbation, fornication, pornography, prostitution, rape, and homosexual acts. These sins are expressions of the vice of lust. These kinds of acts committed against the physical and moral integrity of minors become even more grave (CCC: 2351-2359, 2396).

What are the principal sins against chastity?

Grave sins against chastity differ according to their object: adultery, masturbation, fornication, pornography, prostitution, rape, and homosexual acts. These sins are expressions of the vice of lust. These kinds of acts committed against the physical and moral integrity of minors become even more grave (CCC: 2351-2359, 2396).

THE VORTEX: DEPRIVING BEAUTY

THE VORTEX: DEPRIVING BEAUTY

Catholics don’t appreciate God’s forgiveness because they don’t recognize their sinfulness.

May 4, 2016

To listen the audio on the Vortex: Depriving beauty click below:

TRANSCRIPT

When you look across the landscape of all the polls and surveys, you see about three quarters of Catholics have very little to do with the Faith anymore. There’s a wide spectrum, of course, but at bottom, most do not participate in the sacramental life of the Church. They are indifferent to the saving power of the Church, and the consequent need for frequent confession and reception of Holy Communion.

Considering these are the ordinary means of salvation, what we have is a near-complete collapse of the Church in the West. And these 75–25 percent numbers are for America. In other places in the Western world it’s even more dreadful, where less than 5–10 percent of Catholics avail themselves of the mercy of God through the sacraments.

How has this happened? How have we arrived at such a point where people can be so indifferent to their own eternal destiny? And that is what’s at work here; let’s be direct about it. Our Blessed Lord did not establish a Church and breathe His own divine power into it so that souls could be indifferent to it. He said flatly, “Unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink His blood, you have no life within you” (John 6:53). Those words mean something very plainly.

Saint Paul tells us not to receive the Body and Blood unworthily else we eat and drink our own damnation. These words too have meaning. Both instructions underline the need for confession and Holy Communion — the need, not just the desire or niceness or anything of the kind. In fact, this is precisely what lies at the heart of the Good News.

So why, as the only religion on earth that preaches this (the Orthodox aside), do so few of Her followers believe it or care about it? One simple reason: the abandonment of the preaching about the gravity of sin, its consequences and the devil.

The reason the ordinary means of salvation are treated so lightly is because what they are curing is treated so lightly. They are the remedy for sin, and it needs to be said very plainly, God hates sin. He desires that all be saved from it. He loves the sinner, but He abhors the sin; He cannot countenance it; He cannot brook it. He can have nothing to do with it. It is an offense against His Supreme Beauty.

As long as Catholics continue to be given spiritual gruel about the enormity and ugliness of sin, they will never be able to comprehend the glory of the sacraments. That huge numbers of Catholics simply think everyone who dies goes to Heaven, or practically everyone, they see no need to examine themselves and their own spiritual conditions because they’ve been told, or they’ve plucked from the air, that sin isn’t that big of a deal.

They’ve been told wrong. They’ve been deprived of the beauty of God.

How can the average Catholic who is indifferent to the Church, to God and to sin, and who expects to die and just go to Heaven, ever truly comprehend the most beautiful aspects of the Faith: the mercy of God, His actions on Golgotha, His Real Presence in the Blessed Sacrament?

Answer: He can’t. This is why the approach to try and reinvigorate the dead faith in so many Catholics by appealing to their emotions is a non-starter. Too few people who are baptized Catholics have ever heard about the ugliness of sin, about the great danger of Hell. That Jesus came primarily as Savior is not grasped to the degree it needs to be. There is simply the presumption that all is well, and when I die I go to Heaven.

All is not well. That is exactly how the diabolical wants people thinking; he wants them to believe that, so he introduces thoughts to their imagination, like God wouldn’t throw someone into Hell for all eternity. But the Church and Her spiritual giants like St. Alphonsus Ligouri say, “Never forget at this very moment, there are souls in Hell who at one point in their lives are holier than you are now. Judas raised people from the dead.”

The greatest spiritual deception of the last 50 years — and unfortunately still counting — is that sin is not all that bad, God understands, and we have a reasonable hope therefore that all men are saved.That mindset denies the soul mired and trapped in sin the motivation to ever leave his darkness, because he does not properly see it as darkness, just the result of some bad choices that God excuses at death.

As Our Lord says, “If the light in you is darkness, how deep will the darkness be” (Matthew 6:23).

The Catholic faith lives on the extremes — the extreme of having horrible sin forgiven, and then the resultant joy of realizing just exactly whata you have been saved from and saved for. Saint Catherine of Siena said she would die 10,000 times before she would even commit a venial sin — and she said that because she rightly understood the enormity of sin. Consequently, she understood the overwhelming magnificent beauty of God, so much so that God the Father regularly spoke with her.

Reject all watered-down, phony Catholicism as you would reject any cheap knock-off. Our sins are too great and God’s forgiveness too unimaginable to be confined to a boring little world of no beauty.

Read the source and comments: http://www.churchmilitant.com/video/episode/vort-2016-05-04

CHURCH MILITANT HEADLINES, MAY 4, 2016

CHURCH MILITANT HEADLINES, MAY 4, 2016

Get briefed on today’s top stories with Christine Niles.

May 4, 2016

Please click this link to watch the video on Church Militant Headlines May 4,2016

To listen the audio on Church Militant Headlines May 4,2016 click below:

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THE VORTEX: DEPRIVING BEAUTY http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/2016/05/04/the-vortex-depriving-beauty/

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Sixth Week of Easter & St. Hilary of Arles, May 5,2016

Readings & Reflections: Thursday of the Sixth Week of Easter & St. Hilary of Arles, May 5,2016

AMDG+

Opening Prayer

“Lord, we are an Easter people, and alleluia is our song. May we radiate the joy of Easter and live in the reality of Christ’s victory over sin and death.”

Reading 1 ACTS 18:1-8

Paul left Athens and went to Corinth.
There he met a Jew named Aquila, a native of Pontus,
who had recently come from Italy with his wife Priscilla
because Claudius had ordered all the Jews to leave Rome.
He went to visit them and, because he practiced the same trade,
stayed with them and worked, for they were tentmakers by trade.
Every sabbath, he entered into discussions in the synagogue,
attempting to convince both Jews and Greeks.

When Silas and Timothy came down from Macedonia,
Paul began to occupy himself totally with preaching the word,
testifying to the Jews that the Christ was Jesus.
When they opposed him and reviled him,
he shook out his garments and said to them,
“Your blood be on your heads!
I am clear of responsibility.
From now on I will go to the Gentiles.”
So he left there and went to a house
belonging to a man named Titus Justus, a worshiper of God;
his house was next to a synagogue.
Crispus, the synagogue official, came to believe in the Lord
along with his entire household, and many of the Corinthians
who heard believed and were baptized.

The word of the Lord.

Responsorial Psalm PS 98:1, 2-3AB, 3CD-4

  1. (see 2b)The Lord has revealed to the nations his saving power.
    or:
    R. Alleluia.
    Sing to the LORD a new song,
    for he has done wondrous deeds;
    His right hand has won victory for him,
    his holy arm.
    R. The Lord has revealed to the nations his saving power.
    or:
    R. Alleluia.
    The LORD has made his salvation known:
    in the sight of the nations he has revealed his justice.
    He has remembered his kindness and his faithfulness
    toward the house of Israel.
    R. The Lord has revealed to the nations his saving power.
    or:
    R. Alleluia.
    All the ends of the earth have seen
    the salvation by our God.
    Sing joyfully to the LORD, all you lands;
    break into song; sing praise.
    R. The Lord has revealed to the nations his saving power.
    or:
    R. Alleluia.

Alleluia SEE JN 14:18

  1. Alleluia, alleluia.
    I will not leave you orphans, says the Lord;
    I will come back to you, and your hearts will rejoice.
    R.Alleluia, alleluia.  

Gospel – John 16:16-20

Jesus said to his disciples:
“A little while and you will no longer see me,
and again a little while later and you will see me.”
So some of his disciples said to one another,
“What does this mean that he is saying to us,
‘A little while and you will not see me,
and again a little while and you will see me,’
and ‘Because I am going to the Father’?”
So they said, “What is this ‘little while’ of which he speaks?
We do not know what he means.”
Jesus knew that they wanted to ask him, so he said to them,
“Are you discussing with one another what I said,
‘A little while and you will not see me,
and again a little while and you will see me’?
Amen, amen, I say to you,
you will weep and mourn, while the world rejoices;
you will grieve, but your grief will become joy.”

The Gospel of the Lord.

Reflection 1- Your sorrow will turn into joy

How does “weeping” and “rejoicing” go together? Jesus contrasts present sorrows with the future glory to be revealed to those who put their hope in God. For the people of Israel time was divided into two ages – the present age and the age to come. The prophets foretold the coming of the Messiah as the dawn of a new age. Jesus tells his disciples two important truths. First, he must leave them to return to his Father and second, he will surely come again at the end of time to usher in the new age of God’s kingdom.

Jesus’ orientation for the time between his first coming and his return in glory at the end of the world is a reversal of the world’s fortunes. The world says take your joy now in whatever pleasures you can get from this present life. Jesus points to an “other-worldly” joy which transcends anything this world can offer. Jesus contrasts present sorrows with future joy. A woman in labor suffers the birth-pangs first, but then forgets her sorrow as soon as her new-born child comes to birth. We cannot avoid pain and sorrow if we wish to follow Jesus to the cross. But in the cross of Christ we find freedom, victory, and joy.  Thomas Aquinas said: “No one can live without joy. That is why a man or woman deprived of spiritual joy will turn to carnal pleasures”. Do you know the joy of the Lord?

“To you, O Jesus, do I turn my true and last end. You are the river of life which alone can satisfy my thirst. Without you all else is barren and void. Without all else you alone are enough for me. You are the Redeemer of those who are lost; the sweet Consoler of the sorrowful; the crown of glory for the victors; the recompense of the blessed. One day I hope to receive of your fulness, and to sing the song of praise in my true home. Give me only on earth some few drops of consolation, and I will patiently wait your coming that I may enter into the joy of my Lord.”(Bonaventure, 1221-74 AD) – Read the source: http://www.rc.net/wcc/readings/may5.htm

Reflection 2 – A Reason For Optimism

A merry heart does good, like medicine. —Proverbs 17:22

The Bible isn’t a psychology textbook, but it gives us the wisest counsel for experiencing happiness here and now. Proverbs 17:22, for example, assures us that “a merry heart does good, like medicine, but a broken spirit dries the bones.”

That simple statement was recently corroborated by the extensive research of Dr. Daniel Mark, a heart specialist at Duke University. The New York Times article that reported his findings carried this headline: “Optimism Can Mean Life for Heart Patients and Pessimism Death.” The article begins with these words: “A healthy outlook helps heal the heart.”

But Dr. Nancy Frasure-Smith, a heart specialist who has studied the effect of depression, anxiety, and anger, admitted, “We don’t know how to change negative emotions.”

Faith in God, however, can produce that change. People who look beyond their present difficulty and put their trust in God’s goodness cannot help but be joyful.

It’s significant that our Savior said on several occasions, “Be of good cheer” (Matthew 9:2,22; 14:27; Acts 23:11). Knowing that life is filled with many crises, He encourages us with this word of reassurance: “Be of good cheer, I have overcome the world” (John 16:33).
Vernon C. Grounds

All your anxiety, all your care
Bring to the mercy seat, leave it there;
Never a burden He cannot bear,
Never a friend like Jesus. —Joy

No matter what happens, you can find joy in the Lord (Source: Our Daily Bread, RBC Ministries).

Reflection 3 – St. Hilary of Arles (400-449 A.D.)

It’s been said that youth is wasted on the young. In some ways, that was true for today’s saint.

Born in France in the early fifth century, Hilary came from an aristocratic family. In the course of his education he encountered his relative, Honoratus, who encouraged the young man to join him in the monastic life. Hilary did so. He continued to follow in the footsteps of Honoratus as bishop. Hilary was only 29 when he was chosen bishop of Arles.

The new, youthful bishop undertook the role with confidence. He did manual labor to earn money for the poor. He sold sacred vessels to ransom captives. He became a magnificent orator. He traveled everywhere on foot, always wearing simple clothing.

That was the bright side. Hilary encountered difficulty in his relationships with other bishops over whom he had some jurisdiction. He unilaterally deposed one bishop. He selected another bishop to replace one who was very ill–but, to complicate matters, did not die! Pope St. Leo the Great kept Hilary a bishop but stripped him of some of his powers.

Hilary died at 49. He was a man of talent and piety who, in due time, had learned how to be a bishop.

Read the source: http://www.americancatholic.org/features/saints/saint.aspx?id=1903

SAINT OF THE DAY
Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives. Each saint the Church honors responded to God’s invitation to use his or her unique gifts. God calls each one of us to be a saint. Click here to receive Saint of the Day in your email.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilary_of_Arles  
Saint Hilary of Arles
St. Hilarius (Freiburg) 3602.jpg

Stained glass window depicting St. Hilarius
Born ~403 AD
Died ~449 AD
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
Feast 5 May

Saint Hilary of Arles, also known by his Latin name Hilarius (c. 403-449), was a bishop of Arles in Southern France. He is recognized as a saint by the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox[1] Churches, with his feast day celebrated on 5 May.

Life[edit]

In his early youth, or the 420s, Hilary joined the abbey of Lérins which was, at the time, presided over by his kinsmanHonoratus (Saint Honoré). Hilary seems to have been living in Dijon before this, although other authorities believe he came from Belgica, or Provence. Hilary may have been a relative or “even the son” of the Hilarius who had been prefect of Gaul in 396 and of Rome in 408.[2]

Hilary succeeded his kinsman Honoratus as bishop of Arles in 429. Following the example of St Augustine, he is said to have organized his cathedral clergy into a “congregation,” devoting a great part of their time to social exercises ofasceticism. He held the rank of metropolitan bishop of Vienne and Narbonne, and attempted to exercise the sort of primacy over the church of south Gaul, which seemed implied in the vicariate granted to his predecessor Patroclus of Arles (417).[3]

Hilary deposed the bishop of Besançon, Chelidonus, for ignoring this primacy, and for claiming a metropolitan dignity for Besançon. An appeal was made to Rome, and Pope Leo I used it, in 444, to extinguish the Gallican vicariate headed by Hilary, thus depriving him of his rights to consecrate bishops, call synods, or oversee the church in the province. The pope also secured the edict of Valentinian III, so important in the history of the Gallican church (“Ut episcopis Gallicanis omnibusque pro lege esset quidquid apostolicae sedis auctoritas sanxisset”). These papal claims were made imperial law, and violation of them were subject to legal penalties.[3][4]

Following his death in 449, Hilary’s name was introduced into the Roman martyrology.

Writings[edit]

During his lifetime Hilary had a great reputation for learning and eloquence as well as for piety; his extant works (Vita S. Honorati Arelatensis episcopi and Metrum in Genesin) compare favourably with any similar literary productions of that period.[3]

A poem, De providentia, usually included among the writings of Prosper of Aquitaine, is sometimes attributed to Hilary of Arles.[3]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ (Greek) Ὁ Ἅγιος Ἱλάριος Ἐπίσκοπος Ἀρελάτης. 5 Μαΐου. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  2. Jump up^ Matthisen, Ecclesiastical Factionalism and Religious Controversy in Fifth-Century Gaul (Washington: Catholic University of America, 1989), pp. 77f
  3. ^ Jump up to:a b c d Chisholm 1911.

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Sixth Week of Easter & Blessed Michael Giedroyc, May 4,2016

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Sixth Week of Easter & Blessed Michael Giedroyc, May 4,2016

To the Athenians, Paul appeals to the human conviction that we are made in the image of God. No one can deny that “heaven and earth are full of God’s glory.” Yet, the fallen, rebellious human spirit needs the Spirit of truth to guide us. He comes to the docile.

AMDG+

Opening Prayer

Dear Jesus, bless us with an open heart and an open mind to accept your teachings. Give us the intellect and the wisdom to understand your Word according to your will and not according to the values of the sinful world that surrounds us. Send us your Spirit and bring us the Truth that will set us free. I your Name, we hope and pray. Amen.

Reading 1
Acts 17:15, 22—18:1

After Paul’s escorts had taken him to Athens,
they came away with instructions for Silas and Timothy
to join him as soon as possible.

Then Paul stood up at the Areopagus and said:
“You Athenians, I see that in every respect
you are very religious.
For as I walked around looking carefully at your shrines,
I even discovered an altar inscribed, ‘To an Unknown God.’
What therefore you unknowingly worship, I proclaim to you.
The God who made the world and all that is in it,
the Lord of heaven and earth,
does not dwell in sanctuaries made by human hands,
nor is he served by human hands because he needs anything.
Rather it is he who gives to everyone life and breath and everything.
He made from one the whole human race
to dwell on the entire surface of the earth,
and he fixed the ordered seasons and the boundaries of their regions,
so that people might seek God,
even perhaps grope for him and find him,
though indeed he is not far from any one of us.
For ‘In him we live and move and have our being,’
as even some of your poets have said,
‘For we too are his offspring.’
Since therefore we are the offspring of God,
we ought not to think that the divinity is like an image
fashioned from gold, silver, or stone by human art and imagination.
God has overlooked the times of ignorance,
but now he demands that all people everywhere repent
because he has established a day on which he will “judge the world
with justice’ through a man he has appointed,
and he has provided confirmation for all
by raising him from the dead.”

When they heard about resurrection of the dead,
some began to scoff, but others said,
“We should like to hear you on this some other time.”
And so Paul left them.
But some did join him, and became believers.
Among them were Dionysius,
a member of the Court of the Areopagus,
a woman named Damaris, and others with them.

After this he left Athens and went to Corinth.

The word of the Lord.

Responsorial Psalm
Ps 148:1-2, 11-12, 13, 14

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Praise the LORD from the heavens;
praise him in the heights.
Praise him, all you his angels;
praise him, all you his hosts.
R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Let the kings of the earth and all peoples,
the princes and all the judges of the earth,
Young men too, and maidens,
old men and boys.
R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Praise the name of the LORD,
for his name alone is exalted;
His majesty is above earth and heaven.
R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

He has lifted up the horn of his people;
Be this his praise from all his faithful ones,
from the children of Israel, the people close to him.
Alleluia.
R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Gospel
John16:12-15

Jesus said to his disciples:
“I have much more to tell you, but you cannot bear it now.
But when he comes, the Spirit of truth,
he will guide you to all truth.
He will not speak on his own,
but he will speak what he hears,
and will declare to you the things that are coming.
He will glorify me,
because he will take from what is mine and declare it to you.
Everything that the Father has is mine;
for this reason I told you that he will take from what is mine
and declare it to you.”

The Gospel of the Lord.

Reflection 1 – The Spirit of truth comes

In today’s gospel, Jesus revealed to us a very basic yet important principle of teaching.  When He said: “I have much more to tell you but you cannot bear it now, ” Jesus could have meant that even if teacher and student are so eager to teach and learn, we should give time for everyone to meditate on His teachings, absorb them in their hearts and minds and apply them in their daily lives. There must be a progressive pattern in imparting His teachings before advanced truths can be given and received by those who shall seek Him through His Word.

If Jesus never endeavored to overwhelm His disciples, we, too, should be able to take such a position.  If He gave his teachings to His first disciples, line upon line, precept upon precept, then we too should do the same.

When we allow God’s Word and His teachings to sink into our total being, He will touch our hearts and give us a deepened meaning and understanding in us. He will enable us to apply them in our lives and in our daily interaction with the world and the people around us. We are able to give the Holy Spirit a chance to continue the work that has been started in us as He guides us to the truth and makes us appreciate it and apply it to our lives.

Jesus promised His early disciples and all believers in the generations to come that He will send the Holy Spirit, “the Spirit of truth, Who will guide us to all truth.” The Holy Spirit’s inner ministry is centered on helping every believer grasp the reality of Christ’s words and then experiencing this reality in his life by obeying His Word.

Direction

The Holy Spirit is present in all of us. Let us give the Holy Spirit a chance to work within us.

Prayer

Heavenly Father, send forth your Spirit to teach me, guide me and mold me in the ways of Jesus. In Him I live and move and have my being. Amen.

Reflection 2 – All things to all people

Historian A.N. Wilson, in his biography of St. Paul (Paul: The Mind of the Apostle) argues that Paul can be seen as the founder of Christianity. While Jesus was the true founder, Paul articulated the central issues that came to separate Christianity from Judaism (the need for circumcision and adherence to Jewish dietary laws, for example) and helped to make Jesus’ message intelligible to a non-Jewish audience.

Our first reading (Acts 17:15, 22-18:1) is an excellent example of Paul’s quickwitted approach to evangelism. In his prior preaching, he could refer to the Law of Moses, the words of the prophets and the traditions of the rabbis in delivering his message. But in the Areopagus, Paul translated the message of the gospel for gentile ears, explaining it in terms of the “unknown god” the Greeks worshipped.

Going back a bit further, though, we can see that Paul was simply imitating the master. Jesus argued the law and prophets with learned rabbis in the temple when he was just twelve. During his ministry, he addressed his agrarian audience with stories about sheep, crops and servitude. Sinners responded to his compassion; soldiers responded to his authority.

At the Last Supper, Jesus expresses to his closest friends the most important facet of his personality: his love. He does not expect them to have the power to argue with the most learned men of the day or to speak eloquently to the concerns of everyday people, or to heal the sick or raise the dead. He asks them only to love as he has loved them and to trust that the gift of the Spirit will bring all other gifts with it.

Few of us will have the evangelical gifts of St. Paul, but all of us are called to imitate Jesus in the love which he loves us. The Eucharist we are about to receive reminds us of the depth, breadth and eternity of God’s love for us. (Source: Kathleen M. Carroll, Weekday Homily Helps. Ohio: St. Anthony Messenger Press, May 20, 2009).

Reflection 3 – The Holy Spirit will guide you into all the truth

Are you hungry for truth? Jesus proclaimed that he is the Truth, the Way, and the Life (John 14:6). Truth is not something we create nor is it our discovery. It is the gift of God who is the possessor and giver of all truth. Jesus tells his disciples that it is the role of the Holy Spirit to reveal what is true, right, and good. How can this be? Many skeptics of truth don’t want to believe in an absolute, objective, and unchanging Truth. If truth is objective then it must be asserted to as trustworthy and right and be submitted to as authoritative and binding. Some fear the truth because they think it will inhibit their freedom to act, think, and judge as they wish. Jesus told his disciples that the truth will set you free (John 8:32). The truth liberates us from whatever is false, misleading, doubtful, or deceptive. In God there is no lie or falsehood since he is is utterly true, righteousness, just, and good. Since he is the author and source of all that is true, then the closer we draw near to him in order to listen to his word and understand his mind and will for us, the more we will grow in the knowledge of God and of his great love, wisdom, and provision for us.

The Spirit of truth
Jesus told his disciples that he would send them the Spirit of truth who will guide you into all the truth ..and declare to you the things that are to come (John 16:13). Jesus knew that his disciples could not fully understand on their own everything he had taught and revealed to them while he was physically present with them. He knew that they would need the ongoing guidance and help of the Holy Spirit after he returned to his Father in heaven. That is why he assured them that the Holy Spirit would take what he had spoken to them and guide them in a stronger and fuller understanding of how to live according his word in their daily lives.

Augustine of Hippo (354-430 AD) explains the progressive work of the Spirit in guiding the disciples of Jesus in all the truth:

“Accordingly, when he says, ‘He will teach you all truth’ or ‘will guide you into all truth,’ I do not think the fulfillment is possible in anyone’s mind in this present life. For who is there, while living in this corruptible and soul-oppressing body (Wisdom 9:15), that can know all truth when even the apostle says, ‘We know in part’? But it is effected by the Holy Spirit, of whom we have now received the promise (2 Corinthians 1:21), that we shall attain also to the actual fullness of knowledge that the same apostle references when he says, ‘But then face to face’ and ‘Now I know in part, but then shall I know even as also I am known’ (1 Corinthians 13:12). He is not talking about something he knows fully in this life but about something that would still be in the future when he would attain that perfection. This is what the Lord promised us through the love of the Spirit, when he said, ‘He will teach you all truth’ or ‘will guide you unto all truth.'” (TRACTATES ON THE GOSPEL OF JOHN 96.4)

On the day of Pentecost after the Holy Spirit was poured out upon the first disciples of Jesus, the apostles boldly began to carry out the mission Jesus had entrusted to them – to proclaim the truth of the Gospel and to make disciples [followers of Jesus] of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you, and behold, I am with you always, to the close of the age (Matthew 28:19-20).

Today, through the guidance of the Holy Spirit, we, too, proclaim the same ancient faith which the apostles taught – that Jesus died, and was buried, and rose again on the third day, and will come again to judge, raise the dead, and give everlasting life (from the Apostles Creed). We not only share the same faith which was given to the apostles, we also have the same Holy Spirit who raised Jesus from the dead. The Lord Jesus gives each of us his Holy Spirit as our divine Teacher and Helper that we may grow in the knowledge, wisdom, and strength of God. Do you  listen attentively to God’s word and allow his Holy Spirit to give you understanding of God’s truth and will for your life?

“Lord Jesus, fill me with your Holy Spirit and guide me in your way of life, truth, and goodness. Free me from ignorance of your truth, and from deception and moral blindness caused by sinful pride and rebellion. May I love you with all of my mind, strength, and will and seek to please you in all things.” – Read th source: http://www.rc.net/wcc/readings/may4.htm

Reflection 4 – Spirit of truth comes

Jesus tells his disciples that it is the role of the Holy Spirit to reveal what is true. How can this be? Here’s a story of a woman who had to cope with her husband’s progressive Alzheimer’s disease. She watches him; she worries when she wakes up in the morning. She doesn’t keep her distance. She stays with him, cares for him, bathes him, and dresses him. And she does all this with the knowledge that not only will he never be the same again, but there will come a point when he will not even know who she is. Yet she has not thought of leaving him or divorcing him or staying away. If you are in her situation, could you give love as she loved her husband? The truth of this story is about commitment and love as shown in dying of self for the service of the other. But some fear the truth of unconditional loving because they think it will inhibit their freedom. Jesus told his disciples that the truth will set you free (Jn 8:32). Since God is the source of all truth, then the closer we draw to him and listen to his word, the more we grow in the knowledge of him and of his great love and wisdom for us. The Lord gives us his Holy Spirit as our divine Teacher and Helper that we may grow in the knowledge and wisdom of God. Do you seek the wisdom that comes from above and do you willingly obey God’s word?

“Lord Jesus, fill me with your Holy Spirit and guide me into your way of truth. Free me from erroneous and false ways and lead me in the knowledge of your ways and your will for my life. May there be nothing in my life that is not under your lordship.”

Reflection 5 – Blessed Michael Giedroyc (d. 1485 A.D.)

A life of physical pain and mental torment didn’t prevent Michael Giedroyc from achieving holiness.

Born near Vilnius, Lithuania, Michael suffered from physical and permanent handicaps from birth. He was a dwarf who had the use of only one foot. Because of his delicate physical condition, his formal education was frequently interrupted. But over time, Michael showed special skills at metalwork. Working with bronze and silver, he created sacred vessels, including chalices.

He traveled to Kraków, Poland, where he joined the Augustinians. He received permission to live the life of a hermit in a cell adjoining the monastery. There Michael spent his days in prayer, fasted and abstained from all meat and lived to an old age. Though he knew the meaning of suffering throughout his years, his rich spiritual life brought him consolation. Michael’s long life ended in 1485 in Kraków.

Five hundred years later, Pope John Paul II visited the city and spoke to the faculty of the Pontifical Academy of Theology. The 15th century in Kraków, the pope said, was “the century of saints.” Among those he cited was Blessed Michael Giedroyc.

Read the source: http://www.americancatholic.org/features/saints/saint.aspx?id=1902

SAINT OF THE DAY
Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives. Each saint the Church honors responded to God’s invitation to use his or her unique gifts. God calls each one of us to be a saint. Click here to receive Saint of the Day in your email.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giedroy%C4%87  
Arms of Michał Giedroyć.jpg

Giedroyć (Lithuanian: Giedraitis; Russian and Belarusian: Гедройц; French: Guedroitz) is a Polish surname, originating from the Giedroyć family of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.

Overview[edit]

The Second and Third Editions of the Lithuanian Chronicle relate that Giedrius (Palemonids), a brother of Grand Duke Traidenis of Lithuania (late 13th century), built a castle, named it Giedraičiai, and adopted the title Prince of Giedraičiai.

A document issued by Grand Duke Vytautas of Lithuania in the period 1399-1429 settled a dispute between the Bishop of Vilnius and the Princes of Giedraičiai. Numerous members of the family were recorded in the 15th and 16th centuries, and thereafter, with the title Prince.

The two lines of the family for which coherent genealogies are available (the family’s “central core”) descend from (i) Prince Aleksander (late 15th century) and (ii) Prince Bartłomiej (died in 1524).[1]

The 1569 Act of Union inaugurating the Polish-Lithuanian Royal Commonwealth confirmed that, as previously in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Lithuanian families of dynastic origin remained entitled to use the title Prince. Many subsequent Giedroyć family members, both of the Line of Aleksander and of the Line of Bartłomiej, were recorded with the title Prince – including several (of both Lines) whose right to the title was individually confirmed under Imperial Russian legislation of 1832. Other members did not seek such specific confirmation under the Russian Empire, but relied on confirmation of their noble status and princely origins under Russian legislation of 1801/3. The Imperial Russian heraldic authority classified these as “of the Princes”.

Under the usage of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, as confirmed by the 1569 Act of Union, princely origins in themselves establish princely status.

Armorial bearings[edit]

The Second Edition of the Lithuanian Chronicle records that a centaur was the armorial charge of the forebears of Giedrus. A decree issued in 1401 by Władisław Jagiello, King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania, confirms the right of Prince Michał Giedroyć vel. Ratybor (baptized c.1387) to the arms Hippocentaurus “as used by his illustrious grandfather” Ginwill (2nd Duke of Giedrojcie and candidate to the grand ducal office of Lithuania).

But the earliest surviving illustrated Giedroyć armorial charge is a rose, on seals attached to state documents of 1431-4.

Through the 17th and 18th centuries, the centaur was used predominantly by most members of the family, sometimes in combination with the rose; while the descendants of Mikołaj (died 1657, sixth generation in the Line of Bartłomiej) continued to use the rose alone. But the centaur (sometimes with the rose, sometimes without) predominates in all the 19th century Russian records, even for the descendants of Mikołaj.

At the English College of Arms, the arms of Michał Giedroyć (born 1929, 16th generation in the Line of Bartłomiej) include both the rose and the centaur (called a sagittary in English heraldry) blazoned as follows: Per fess Or and Gules in chief a Rose Gules barbed and seeded proper and in base a Sagittary trippant to the dexter the head facing to the sinister his tail a serpent facing to the dexter holding in the hands a Bow with arrow drawn and set towards the head of the serpent all Or.

Notable people[edit]

Early bearers of the Giedroyć name included:

  • Blessed Michał Giedroyć, pre-dating the lines of Aleksander and Bartłomiej: buried in the church of St Mark in Kraków, where he lived most of his life as a hermit renowned for gifts of prophecy and miracles; died in 1485.
  • son of the eponymous Bartłomiej in the Line of Bartłomiej: Mateusz Giedroyć (envoy to Ivan the Terrible 1551, Grand Ducal Governor of Vilnius, Grand Ducal Marshal, died 1562/3).
  • grandsons of the eponymous Bartłomiej in the Line of Bartłomiej: Kacper-Dowmont Giedroyć (born c1535, signatory of the Act of Union 1569), Melchior Giedroyć(c1536-1609, Bishop of Samogitia and champion of the Lithuanian language and culture) and Martin-Dowmont Giedroyć (died 1621, Palatine of Mstislaw).

Other distinguished members of the two main lines of the family included:

  • General Romuald Tadeusz Giedroyć (1750–1824, 10th generation in the Line of Aleksander): fought as Major General in the 1792 war against Russia; played a major role in the 1794 uprising in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania; moved to Paris after the 1795 collapse and partition of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth; served as a General in Napoleon‘s Grande Armée 1813; exiled in Archangel; then a Lieutenant General in the Kingdom of Poland from 1815.
  • General Romuald’s brother, Monsignor Piotr Kacper Giedroyć (died 1797): Secretary of State of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania 1790-95.
  • General Romuald’s son, Józef Stefan Franciszek Ksawery Giedroyć (1787–1855): Colonel in the Grande Armée 1808-1815, promoted Brigadier General on the field of the Battle of Waterloo.
  • General Romuald’s daughter, Kunegunda Franciszka Róża Giedroyć (1793–1883): Lady in Waiting to French Empress Josephine (Joséphine de Beauharnais), and to Russian Tsarina Elizabeth Alexeievna (Louise of Baden), wife of Alexander I of Russia.
  • Stefan Jan Giedroyć (1730–1803, 9th generation of the Line of Aleksander, a fifth cousin of General Romuald’s father): Bishop of Livonia, and later of Samogitia; a member of the Permanent Council of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.
  • Józef Arnolf Giedroyć (1754–1838, 9th generation in the line of Bartłomiej): Bishop of Samogitia from 1801, succeeding Bishop Stefan Jan above; benefactor of the Church, champion of education and patron of Lithuanian literature, he published in 1816 the first translation of the New Testament into Samogitian (a dialect of the Lithuanian language).
  • Szymon Tadeusz Michał Giedroyć (1764–1844, 10th generation in the line of Aleksander, first cousin once removed of Bishop Stefan Jan above): Bishop Coadjutor and – from 1829 – Administrator of Samogitia.
  • Ignacy Michał Giedroyć (1771–1829, 10th generation in the line of Aleksander, second cousin of Bishop of Szymon Tadeusz Michał above): Bishop Coadjutor of Samogitia, titular Bishop of Casio.
  • Ignacy Giedroyć (active 1763-1792, 9th generation of the line of Bartłomiej, first cousin of Bishop Józef Arnolf above): Quartermaster General of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania; Governor of Osiek; envoy in 1771 to Frederick the Great of Prussia and to Frederick II, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel on behalf of the Bar Confederation (the Polish-Lithuanian anti-Russian movement).
  • Witold Giedroyć (1826/30-1885, 12th generation in the line of Aleksander) and his first cousin once removed Mikołaj Karol Giedroyć (1825–1894, 13th generation in the line of Aleksander): leaders of the anti-Russian conspiracy of 1863.
  • Franciszek Ignacy Dowmont Giedroyć (1869–1944, 14th generation in the line of Bartłomiej, third cousin five times removed of Bishop Józef Arnolf above): Professor of the History and Philosophy of Medicine at the University of Warsaw, member of the Polish Academy of Sciences, co-founder of the Polish school of the history of medicine.
  • Vera Ignatievna Giedroyc (Gedroitz) (1876–1932, 12th generation of the line of Bartłomiej, third cousin once removed of Bishop Józef Arnolf above, and sixth cousin twice removed of Franciszek Ignacy Dowmont above): the first female surgeon in Russia, her work on laparotomies during the Russo-Japanese War was among the first to achieve a high success rate, leading the Russian army to adopt the procedure and changing understandings of the correct treatment of abdominal wounds. She was surgeon to the imperial family at Tsarskoye Selo from 1909; worked at the front in World War I; and was professor (from 1923) and then chair of the surgery faculty (from 1930) at the Kiev Medical Institute. She also published poetry under the pseudonym Sergei Gedroitz.
  • Tadeusz Giedroyć (1889/90-1941, 15th generation in the line of Bartłomiej, third cousin once removed of Franciszek Ignacy Dowmont above): soldier, awarded the Polish Cross of Valour (Cross of Valour (Poland)) in 1918, and Cross of Independence in 1932; lawyer, administrator; Senator of the Second Polish Republic from 1938; imprisoned by the Russians in 1939, and subsequently murdered by the Soviet secret police, NKVD.
  • Jerzy Giedroyc (1906–2000, 14th generation in the line of Aleksander, fifth cousin twice removed of Witold above): founder, editor and publisher of the literary-political journal Kultura. The Polish parliament declared 2006 the year of Jerzy Giedroyć.

Current members of the family include:

  • Coky Giedroyc (Mary-Rose Helen Giedroyć, born 1963, 17th generation in the line of Bartłomiej, granddaughter of Tadeusz above), film and TV director.
  • Mel Giedroyc (Melanie Clare Sophie Giedroyć born 1968, 17th generation in the line of Bartłomiej, granddaughter of Tadeusz above), English actress, presenter and writer.

Bearers of the name Guedroitz (the French version of the Russian version of Giedroyć) include:

  • Wladimir Guedroitz (1869–1941, 13th generation in the line of Aleksander, great-great-nephew of Bishop Szymon Tadeusz Michał Giedroyć above): Chairman of the Commission for Control at the Russian Ministry of Finance.
  • Alexis Guedroitz (1923–1992, 15th generation in the line of Aleksander, grandson of Wladimir above), Belgian professor of Russian language, lecturer and writer.
  • Agnes Guedroitz (born 1949, 16th generation in the line of Aleksander, daughter of Alexis above), Belgian actress.

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ For a full genealogy of those two lines see On-line Gotha

Bibliography[edit]

  • Ferrand,

Pope Francis’ special devotion for the Virgin Mary

Pope Francis’ special devotion for the Virgin Mary

Published on May 3, 2016

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May 3, 2016. He constantly mentions her name in his sermons and homilies.

Related Articles/ Videos click below:

The Rosary to the Blessed Virgin Mary: Our Respond to Defend the Family

The Rosary to Our Lady: The best prayer for men

The Mystery of the Rosary: A Short Documentary

Virgo Potens: 8 Quotes by Roman Pontiffs on the Rosary

6 Things All Catholics Should Know About the Rosary

A Powerful Weapon: 15 Quotes on the Holy Rosary

Forged by War: The 3 Battles in the Rise of the Rosary

The Rosary is our spiritual weapon of mass destruction against satan

Mary: Queen of the Rosary

THE DOWNLOAD—OUR LADY, HELP OF EXORCISTS, TERROR OF DEMONS http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/2016/03/22/the-download-our-lady-help-of-exorcists-terror-of-demons/

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Why the angel showed reverence to Mary? St. Thomas Aquinas examines the reasons why the angel Gabriel showed such reverence to Mary, saying, “Hail!” http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/2016/02/04/why-the-angel-showed-reverence-to-mary-st-thomas-aquinas-examines-the-reasons-why-the-angel-gabriel-showed-such-reverence-to-mary-saying-hail/

The miracles of Lourdes: What criteria are used by the Church to recognize them? http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/2016/02/08/the-miracles-of-lourdes-what-criteria-are-used-by-the-church-to-recognize-them/

THE DOWNLOAD—THE HISTORY OF THE BROWN SCAPULAR AND THE ROSARY http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/2016/03/22/the-download-the-history-of-the-brown-scapular-and-the-rosary/

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MICHAEL VORIS: THE CHURCH AND HER SACRAMENTS (VIDEO) http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/2016/05/01/michael-voris-the-church-and-her-sacraments-video/

Why is May the Month of Mary? http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/2016/05/02/why-is-may-the-month-of-mary/

THE VORTEX: MARY IS MOTHER AND GENERAL – Hell cannot long bear confronting the glory of Mary http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/2016/05/03/the-vortex-mary-is-mother-and-general-hell-cannot-long-bear-confronting-the-glory-of-mary/

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The Woman I Love, the Blessed Virgin Mary by Archbishop Fulton Sheen click below:

The woman I love, the Blessed Virgin Mary by Venerable Fulton Sheen

This video presentations show about the Woman we love, Our Lady of the Blessed Virgin Mary. “She is acknowledged and honored as being truly the mother of God and of the redeemer…. She is clearly the mother of the members of Christ … since she has by her charity joined in bringing about the birth of believers in the Church, who are members of its head. Mary, Mother of Christ, Mother of the Church” (CCC:963).

Mary’s prayer is revealed to us at the dawning of the fullness of time. Before the incarnation of the Son of God, and before the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, her prayer cooperates in a unique way with the Father’s plan of loving kindness: at the Annunciation, for Christ’s conception; at Pentecost, for the formation of the Church, his body (cf. Lk 1:38; Acts 1:14). In the faith of his humble handmaid, the Gift of God found the acceptance he had awaited from the beginning of time. She whom the Almighty made “full of grace” responds by offering her whole being: “Behold I am the handmaid of the Lord; let it be done to me according to your word” “Fiat”: this is Christian prayer: to be wholly God’s, because he is wholly ours. The Gospel reveals to us how Mary prays and intercedes in faith. At Cana, the mother of Jesus asks her son for the needs of a wedding feast (Jn 2:1-12); this is the sign of another feast – that of the wedding of the Lamb where he gives his body and blood at the request of the Church, his Bride. It is at the hour of the New Covenant, at the foot of the cross (cf. Jn 19:25-27), that Mary is heard as the Woman, the new Eve, the true “Mother of all the living” (CCC: 2617-2618).

Pope Francis asks for the role of women to be assessed in his May prayer intention video

Pope Francis asks for the role of women to be assessed in his May prayer intention video

Published on May 3, 2016

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“The contribution of women is undeniable but is it enough only to recognize it?” says the Pope.

Video Released for Pope’s May Prayer Intentions

Intentions this month focus on women, the rosary

Screen Shot 2016-05-03 at 9.58.17 AM

In this Jubilee Year of Mercy, Pope Francis has been releasing video messages to illustrate his monthly prayer intentions, announced by the Apostleship of Prayer.

Today, the May video was released.

Videos for January-April can be viewed here: http://apostleshipofprayer.org/the-pope-video

The Pope’s intentions for May are:

“That in every country in the world, women may be honoured and respected and that their essential contribution to society may be highly esteemed.”

and

“That families, communities and groups may pray the Holy Rosary for evangelisation and peace.”

This month’s video focuses on the first intention

The Pope says:

The contribution of women in all areas of human activity is undeniable, beginning with the family.

But only to recognize it…Is that enough?

We have done little for the women who are in very difficult situations–despised, marginalized, and even reduced to slavery.

We must condemn sexual violence against women and remove the barriers that prevent their full integration into social, political, and economic life.

If you think this is clearly right, join my petition. It is a prayer–that in all countries of the world women may be honored and respected and valued for their essential contribution to society.

Pope Francis in Santa Marta: There are Christians who act like embalmed mummies

Pope Francis in Santa Marta: There are Christians who act like embalmed mummies

Published on May 3, 2016

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May 3, 2016. “They don’t do evil, but they don’t do good things,” Pope Francis said.

Pope’s Morning Homily: Don’t Be a Mummy Christian or a Vagabond Christian

At Casa Santa Marta, recalls that only Jesus is the Way

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Pope Francis today recalled that to be a Christian, there is only one path to follow: Jesus, who says of himself, “I am the way.”

The Pope said this today during morning Mass at Casa Santa Marta, reported Vatican Radio.

In contrast to those who follow Jesus as the Way, the Pope warned against being either a “mummy” Christian of a “vagabond” Christian.

Mummies

“Christians who stay still, who don’t go forward, are non-Christian Christians. We don’t know exactly what they are. They are slightly ‘paganized’ Christians: who are there, who stay still and don’t go forward in their Christian lives, who don’t make the Beatitudes bloom in their lives, who don’t do Works of mercy… they are motionless. Excuse me for saying it, but they are like an (embalmed) mummy, a spiritual mummy there. There are Christians who are ‘spiritual mummies,’ motionless, there.  They don’t do evil but they don’t do good things.”

Vagabonds

“They are wanderers in the Christian life, vagabonds.  During their life they turn here and there and thus lose the beauty of drawing close to Jesus in Jesus’ life.  They lose their way because they are constantly turning and often this turning is wrong and takes them to a dead end. Turning so many times, (the road) becomes a labyrinth and then they don’t know how to get out. They have lost that call from Jesus. They don’t have a compass to get out and they keep on turning and searching. There are other Christians who whilst journeying are seduced by the beauty of an object and they stop half way, fascinated by what they see, by some idea,  a proposal or a landscape. And they stop! Christian life is not a fascination: it’s the truth!  It’s Jesus Christ!”

The Pope then advised that we should each examine what kind of Christian we are:

Are we standing in front of the things that we like such as worldliness and vanity or are we journeying forward and “putting into practice the beatitudes and Works of mercy” in our daily life. He concluded by saying that Jesus’ way “is full of consolations, glory and also the Cross. But always with peace in our souls.”

“We remain here today with that question: let’s do it for just five minutes…  How am I doing on this Christian journey?  Am I standing still, making mistakes,  turning here and there, stopping in front of the things that I like, or (am I following) Jesus ‘I who am the Way.’?  And let us implore the Holy Spirit to teach us to journey along the right road, always!  And when we get tired, a little rest and then we go forward again. Let us ask for this grace.”

THE DOWNLOAD—WHAT IS TRUTH?

THE DOWNLOAD—WHAT IS TRUTH?

by Christine Niles, M.St. (Oxon.), J.D.  •  ChurchMilitant.com  •  May 3, 2016

Bruce Jenner posted a video of himself last week entering the women’s bathroom in Trump Tower in New York. “Last week, Donald Trump said I could take a pee anywhere in a Trump facility,” Jenner says on the video, “so I am gonna’ go take a pee in the ladies’ room.”

After being shown entering the ladies’ room, the video cuts to Jenner exiting the bathroom and saying, “Thank you, Donald. I really appreciate it.” He then winks at the camera after remarking, “And by the way, nobody got molested.”

Jenner is referring to Trump’s recent remarks on North Carolina’s “bathroom law,” which limits people to using the bathroom corresponding to their biological sex. “You leave it the way it is,”Trump said at a recent town hall. “There have been very few complaints the way it is. People go, they use the bathroom that they feel is appropriate.”

When asked to clarify whether Bruce Jenner could use the ladies’ room at one of his buildings, Trump answered, “That is correct.”

Several days later, Jenner — former Olympic gold medalist who last year began to identify as a woman named Caitlyn — posted the aforementioned video.

After Trump’s remarks, fellow Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz, who supports North Carolina’s bathroom law, criticized Trump for failing to support the state.

“Donald agreed with Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama in attacking the state of North Carolina for passing their bathroom ordinance,” Cruz said at a rally in Maryland. “And Donald, on television this morning, said, gosh, he thought that men should be able to go into the girls’ bathroom if they want to. Now let me ask you, have we gone stark raving nuts?”

Watch the panel discuss transgender ideology on “The Download—What Is Truth?

Read the source and comments: http://www.churchmilitant.com/news/article/the-downloadwhat-is-truth

Christine Niles is a staff writer, producer and anchor for ChurchMilitant.com Follow Christine on Twitter: @ChristineNiles1

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