Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Twenty-ninth Week in Ordinary Time & St. John Paul II, October 22,2014

Readings & Reflections: Wednesday of the Twenty-ninth Week in Ordinary Time & St. John Paul II, October 22,2014

Poet, philosopher, priest, Karol Wojtyla (1920-2005) was born in Poland an served as pope for 28 years. Rooted in the conviction that Christ reveals man to himself, his apostolic witness included trips to 129 countries, the eloquent defense of family life, and the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

AMDG+

Opening Prayer

“Lord, you are faithful even when I fail. Help me to remain ever faithful to you and to not shrink back when I encounter difficulties. Make me diligent in the exercise of my responsibilities and wise and prudent in the use of my gifts, time and resources.” Amen.

Reading 1
Eph 3:2-12

Brothers and sisters:
You have heard of the stewardship of God’s grace
that was given to me for your benefit,
namely, that the mystery was made known to me by revelation,
as I have written briefly earlier.
When you read this
you can understand my insight into the mystery of Christ,
which was not made known to human beings in other generations
as it has now been revealed
to his holy Apostles and prophets by the Spirit,
that the Gentiles are coheirs, members of the same Body,
and copartners in the promise in Christ Jesus through the Gospel.

Of this I became a minister by the gift of God’s grace
that was granted me in accord with the exercise of his power.
To me, the very least of all the holy ones, this grace was given,
to preach to the Gentiles the inscrutable riches of Christ,
and to bring to light for all what is the plan of the mystery
hidden from ages past in God who created all things,
so that the manifold wisdom of God
might now be made known through the Church
to the principalities and authorities in the heavens.
This was according to the eternal purpose
that he accomplished in Christ Jesus our Lord,
in whom we have boldness of speech
and confidence of access through faith in him.

Responsorial Psalm
Isaiah 12:2-3, 4bcd, 5-6
R. (see 3) You will draw water joyfully from the springs of salvation.

God indeed is my savior;
I am confident and unafraid.
My strength and my courage is the LORD,
and he has been my savior.
With joy you will draw water
at the fountain of salvation.
R. You will draw water joyfully from the springs of salvation.

Give thanks to the LORD, acclaim his name;
among the nations make known his deeds,
proclaim how exalted is his name.
R. You will draw water joyfully from the springs of salvation.

Sing praise to the LORD for his glorious achievement;
let this be known throughout all the earth.
Shout with exultation, O city of Zion,
for great in your midst
is the Holy One of Israel!
R. You will draw water joyfully from the springs of salvation.

Gospel
Lk 12:39-48

Jesus said to his disciples:
“Be sure of this: if the master of the house had known the hour when the thief was coming, he would not have let his house be broken into. You also must be prepared, for at an hour you do not expect, the Son of Man will come.”

Then Peter said,
“Lord, is this parable meant for us or for everyone?” And the Lord replied, “Who, then, is the faithful and prudent steward whom the master will put in charge of his servants to distribute the food allowance at the proper time? Blessed is that servant whom his master on arrival finds doing so.Truly, I say to you, he will put him in charge of all his property. But if that servant says to himself, ‘My master is delayed in coming,’ and begins to beat the menservants and the maidservants, to eat and drink and get drunk, then that servant’s master will come on an unexpected day and at an unknown hour and will punish the servant severely and assign him a place with the unfaithful. That servant who knew his master’s will but did not make preparations nor act in accord with his will shall be beaten severely; and the servant who was ignorant of his master’s will but acted in a way deserving of a severe beating shall be beaten only lightly.  Much will be required of the person entrusted with much, and still more will be demanded of the person entrusted with more.”

The Gospel of the Lord.

Reflection 1 – The riches of Christ

Saint Paul preached to the Gentiles the “inscrutable riches of Christ.” Ephesians 3:8  God entrusted to him a task that did not end in his lifetime. It was handed down to all generations so that every man may have the chance of knowing our Lord Jesus and in Him achieve the fullness of life. God expected Saint Paul and all believers who shall follow after him, to contribute their fair share in expanding His kingdom so that every man may have the chance of knowing Him and experiencing His love through Christ which is beyond measure.

This job was entrusted to us when Jesus said: “Go into the world and proclaim the good news to all creation.” Luke 16:15   It is also stated in Acts 1:8: “You shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, yes even to the ends of the earth.” And in Matthew 5:16, Jesus said:“ Your light must shine before men so that they may see goodness in your acts and give praise to your heavenly Father.”

When we speak of stewardship, most often our focus is made on wealth, riches and anything that is tangible. But today God is speaking to us about the true kind of wealth, one that is not limited to currency, acreage, power and influence. One that neither moth nor rust can corrode nor thieves can break in and steal. He is speaking of the riches and the true wealth we all have in Christ and His Word.

Christ as God’s gift to us flows from the loving provision of the Father and our role is to be sensible, faithful stewards. God gave His all to us, even the gift of Himself. What have we done to God’s gift to us? What He has given to us for free, have we shared with God’s people or have we kept it within the enclosures of our selfish hearts? Have we done our share of opening up to the Spirit and allow His work in us so that our character may be formed according to Christ?

We are caretakers of God’s Word and it’s a great privilege to be counted among those who have been asked to be fruitful in His Name. With such privilege, comes our responsibility. What have we done for our Heavenly Father in terms of bringing His Word to the world and being His witness? Jesus reminds us today, “Much will be required of the person entrusted with much, and still more will be demanded of the person entrusted with more.”  

Let us conduct a self-examination and ask ourselves how we have allowed the Spirit to work in us.  The Spirit is calling us now to face ourselves while time is still in our favor.

We are accountable to our Heavenly Father. None of us can escape that fact. On judgment day all of us have to answer to our Lord.  Not just somebody else, but me and you.

Let us open our hearts to the mighty action of the Spirit as accountability from a Christian perspective at the present time is not meant for punishment, but for growth in God’s grace.  How well have we cared for God’s people within our community?  How well have we shared Christ with others? How well have we all grown in His grace? Our goal is to become more like the One to whom we ultimately are to give our account.  Let us resolve to be faithful to our calling as His disciples and servants and bear fruit.

Direction

Bring God’s Word to friends and family, acquaintance and co- worker. Be a shining example of our Lord. Live in the Spirit and be transformed.

Prayer

Heavenly Father, I pray that You will continue to use me as your vessel of love, mercy and healing despite my shortcomings and failure to be totally faithful to You. In Jesus, I pray Amen.

Reflection 2 – Use It Or Lose It

Be doers of the Word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. –James 1:22

I once came across an article that was titled “National Geographic, The Doomsday Machine.” It humorously stated that National Geographic magazine will soon doom the American continent to a watery grave because no one ever throws it away. Issue after issue piles up in attics and basements all over America. In time, the accumulation of heavy paper will trigger earthquakes in California, sink coal-mining towns, and precipitate mud slides. Especially hard hit will be large cities where subscribers cluster.

This lighthearted idea has a serious spiritual counterpart in people who accumulate God’s Word in their minds. The tendency is to store up and file scriptural truth in our heads, but that isn’t enough. James reminded us that we must be doers of the Word, not just hearers (1:22). Jesus spoke of the need to put His words into practice (Lk. 12:41-48). Understanding the Scriptures makes us responsible to put its truths into action. It’s all too easy to have a “save it” rather than a “use it” attitude.

The Lord hasn’t made His Word available just to give us interesting reading. He’s preparing us for action. If we ignore this truth, we’ll find out on judgment day that taking God’s Word lightly carries weighty consequences.  — Mart De Haan

No truth of God stored in the mind
Will ever meet our needs
Until that truth gives birth to faith
And faith gives birth to deeds. –DJD

It’s a heavy responsibility to own a Bible (Source: Our Daily Bread, RBC Ministries).

Reflection 3 – The struggle of our spiritual life

In Romans 6:12-18, Paul speaks about the power of sin. He refers not simply to individual acts but to sin as though it were a foreign power or virus inside us with its own momentum which we cannot control. Even though we are baptized into the Lord Jesus, the residual effects of the extracted power of sin remain in us.  They are somewhat like the phantom feelings that remain when a limb is removed. The battle between sin and grace continues in our bodies and lives. Much like a habit that we think we have under control, we find that it surfaces again when we least expect it. We are constantly reminded of the holding power of sin. Baptism does not immunize us from those residual effects. For this reason, our prayer life and spiritual life need constant attention not only because old tendencies tend to resurface but also because special moments of grace-filled revelation can come unexpectedly as well. What shall we do then for our spiritual life?

In his sermon, St. Augustine of Hippo wrote: “Once and for all, a short rule is laid down for you: Love, and do what you will. If you keep silence, do it out of love. If you cry out, do it out of love. If you refrain from punishing, do it out of love… Let the root of love be within. From such a root nothing but good can come.” As St. Paul points out that freed by grace and the gift of Christ’s resurrection, we are slaves no longer of sin, but of justice. To the extent that we manifest that grace in our daily lives, our actions will reflect the love and justice from which they spring.

For Paul, love and justice always involves more than the individual and his or her relationship with God. It is the believing community that passes on the gospel, beliefs and traditions through which we have been freed of our sins and set on a path of justice. And may we discern those specific ways in which we are called to love and do what we will for the sake of justice and on behalf of the powerless, the forgotten, and those without hope.

Let us always hope that the Lord comes to us unexpectedly even in crisis. It really is a warning against our complacency to do God’s will as His faithful servant as the subject of today’s gospel (Lk 12:39-48). Such admonition of Jesus is necessary not because the Holy Spirit is weak but because, unlike the Lord, we are not completely transparent to God’s power. We have pocket of resistance in our lives. This is the reason why we become the battleground and a place of struggle.

The fact that we experience the struggle of the spiritual life is not a sign of failure but of success. Those who are totally closed to God’s Spirit have given up the struggle. (Source: Rev. Joseph Krempa. Daily Homilies. Vol. I. New York: Alba House, 1985, pp. 201-202; Anthony J. Schulte. Weekday Homily Helps. Ohio: St. Anthony Messenger Press, October 21, 2009).

Reflection 4 – The Son of Man will come

Jesus teaches his disciples to be ready for our encounter with him at the moment of death and to be ready for his second coming.

Yesterday we listened to Jesus compare his disciples to servants waiting for the master’s return from a marriage feast. The servants who are vigilant and welcome the master are seated at table and served by the master when he returns. When Jesus knocks at the door, we must open the door to him.

Just like the householder does not know when a thief may strike, we do not know the day or the hour of Jesus’ return. Saint Cyril of Alexandria interprets the three watches of the night to three stages in our lives: childhood, youth-adulthood and old age. “The first of these, in which we are still children, is not called to account by God but is deemed worthy of pardon, because of the innocence as yet of the mind and the weakness of the understanding. The second and the third – the periods of adulthood and old age – owe obedience and piety of life to God, according to his good pleasure. Whoever is found watching and well-belted, whether by change he is still young or has arrived at old age, shall be blessed. For he will be counted worthy of attaining to Christ’s promise” (Commentary on Luke, Homily 92)

Today, Jesus compares the apostles to domestic servants who are charged with various duties in the household of God’s kingdom. The royal tasks entrusted to them must be fulfilled diligently before Christ’s sudden return (Ignatius Catholic Study Bible: New Testament, 133). Unfaithful stewards neglect their duties and are punished. To whom much is given, much will be required.

In short, watchfulness, diligence, service, fidelity leads to the joy of heaven; carelessness, laziness, greed and infidelity leads to punishment for sin.

Saint Paul exemplifies the characteristics of the good and faithful servant. He is watchful and allows himself to be guided by the Holy Spirit. He is diligent, even working to sustain himself and not burden the Christian communities with whom he stays. He serves tirelessly and sees his life as being for the service of the Gospel. Today, he calls his ministry “stewardship”, since it has been entrusted to him by God and given to him for the benefit of the people he serves. Finally, he is faithful, faithful to Christ and to the mission he has been given.

Not only is Paul a steward of the mysteries of God, he is a minister and servant (diakonos). Paul serves the Gentile Christians by communicating to them the mysteries of salvation, mysteries revealed to the Apostles and prophets by the Holy Spirit. This plan of salvation includes the Gentiles, who, in Jesus Christ and through the Gospel, have been made coheirs of the promises made to Israel and members of the Body of Christ. This inheritance is eternal life.

Read the source: http://www.zenit.org/en/articles/daily-homily-the-son-of-man-will-come

Reflection 5 – Much will be required

“It is within the everyday world that you, the laity, must bear witness to God’s Kingdom; through you the Church’s mission is fulfilled by the power of the Holy Spirit. The Council taught that the specific task of the laity is precisely this: to “seek the Kingdom of God by engaging to the plan of God.” You are called to live in the world, to engage in secular professions and occupations, to live in those ordinary circumstances of family life and life in society from which is woven the very web of your existence. You are called by God himself to exercise your proper functions according to the spirit of the Gospel and to work for the sanctification of the world from within, in the manner of leaven. In this way you can make Christ known to others, especially by the witness of your lives. It is for you as lay people to direct all temporal affairs to the praise of the Creator and Redeemer.

“The temporal order of which the Council speaks is vast. It encompasses the social, cultural, intellectual, political, and economic life in which all of you rightly participate. As lay men and women actively engaged in this temporal order, you are being called by Christ to sanctify the world and to transform it. This is true of all work, however exalted or humble, but it is especially urgent for those whom circumstances and special talent have placed in positions of leadership or influence: men and women in public service, education, business, science, social communications, and the arts. As Catholic lay people you have an important moral and cultural contribution of service to make to the life of your country. Much will be required of the person entrusted with much (Lk 12.48). These words of Christ apply not only to the sharing of material wealth or personal talents, but also to the sharing of one’s faith” (Source: St. John Paul II, Magnificat, Vol. 16, No.8, October 2014, pp. 317-318).

Reflection 6 – St. John Paul II (1920-2005 A.D.)

“Open wide the doors to Christ,” urged John Paul II during the homily at the Mass when he was installed as pope in 1978.

Born in Wadowice, Poland, Karol Jozef Wojtyla had lost his mother, father and older brother before his 21st birthday. Karol’s promising academic career at Krakow’s Jagiellonian University was cut short by the outbreak of World War II. While working in a quarry and a chemical factory, he enrolled in an “underground” seminary in Kraków. Ordained in 1946, he was immediately sent to Rome where he earned a doctorate in theology.

Back in Poland, a short assignment as assistant pastor in a rural parish preceded his very fruitful chaplaincy for university students. Soon he earned a doctorate in philosophy and began teaching that subject at Poland’s University of Lublin.

Communist officials allowed him to be appointed auxiliary bishop of Kraków in 1958, considering him a relatively harmless intellectual. They could not have been more wrong!

He attended all four sessions of Vatican II and contributed especially to itsPastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World. Appointed as archbishop of Kraków in 1964, he was named a cardinal three years later.

Elected pope in October 1978, he took the name of his short-lived, immediate predecessor. Pope John Paul II was the first non-Italian pope in 455 years. In time, he made pastoral visits to 124 countries, including several with small Christian populations.

He promoted ecumenical and interfaith initiatives, especially the 1986 Day of Prayer for World Peace in Assisi. He visited Rome’s Main Synagogue and the Western Wall in Jerusalem; he also established diplomatic relations between the Holy See and Israel. He improved Catholic-Muslim relations and in 2001 visited a mosque in Damascus, Syria.

The Great Jubilee of the Year 2000, a key event in John Paul’s ministry, was marked by special celebrations in Rome and elsewhere for Catholics and other Christians. Relations with the Orthodox Churches improved considerably during his ministry as pope.

“Christ is the center of the universe and of human history” was the opening line of his 1979 encyclical, Redeemer of the Human Race. In 1995, he described himself to the United Nations General Assembly as “a witness to hope.”

His 1979 visit to Poland encouraged the growth of the Solidarity movement there and the collapse of communism in central and eastern Europe 10 years later. He began World Youth Day and traveled to several countries for those celebrations. He very much wanted to visit China and the Soviet Union but the governments in those countries prevented that.

One of the most well-remembered photos of his pontificate was his one-on-one conversation in 1983 with Mehmet Ali Agca, who had attempted to assassinate him two years earlier.

In his 27 years of papal ministry, John Paul II wrote 14 encyclicals and five books, canonized 482 saints and beatified 1,338 people.

In the last years of his life, he suffered from Parkinson’s disease and was forced to cut back on some of his activities.

Pope Benedict XVI beatified John Paul II in 2011, and Pope Francis canonized him in 2014.
Read the source: http://www.americancatholic.org/features/saints/saint.aspx?id=1949

Comment:

Before John Paul II’s funeral Mass in St. Peter’s Square, hundreds of thousands of people had waited patiently for a brief moment to pray before his body, which lay in state inside St. Peter’s for several days. The media coverage of his funeral was unprecedented.

Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, then dean of the College of Cardinals and later Pope Benedict XVI, presided at the funeral Mass and concluded his homily by saying: “None of us can ever forget how, in that last Easter Sunday of his life, the Holy Father, marked by suffering, came once more to the window of the Apostolic Palace and one last time gave his blessing urbi et orbi [‘to the city and to the world’].

“We can be sure that our beloved pope is standing today at the window of the Father’s house, that sees us and blesses us. Yes, bless us, Holy Father. We entrust your dear soul to the Mother of God, your Mother, who guided you each day and who will guide you now to the glory of her Son, our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen.”

Quote:

In his 1999 Letter to the Elderly, Pope John Paul II wrote: “Grant, O Lord of life,…when the moment of our definitive ‘passage’ comes, that we may face it with serenity, without regret for what we shall leave behind. For in meeting you, after having sought you for so long, we shall find once more every authentic good which we have known here on earth, in the company of all those who have gone before us marked with the sign of faith and hope….Amen.”

Related St. Anthony Messenger article(s) 

Pope John Paul II: 25 Years of Service, by Cindy Wooden, Cardinal Roger Mahony, John Thavis, Mary Ann Walsh, RSM, and Bishop Joseph Galante

Pope John Paul II: Model of Heroic Service, by Jack Wintz, OFM

ChurchMilitant.TV News 10-21-2014

ChurchMilitant.TV News 10-21-2014

Published on Oct 21, 2014

Top Stories:
1. Synod’s Final Report Is Accurate If Not Complete Says Burke
2. Cardinal Marx Claims “Church Teaching Can Change”
3. Christian Pastors Forced to Perform Gay Weddings in Idaho
4. Houston’s Archdiocese Denounces City’s Violation of Religious Freedom – [Background]
5. Catholic University Of America Hosts Pro-Homosexual Movie and Speaker

Resource Page:
http://cmtvnews.com/2014/10/21/top-st…

The 12 Step Biblical Guide to the Pope and Infallibility

The Golden Calf & Our Catholic Mass: 3 Reasons Man Cannot Invent the Liturgy

The Golden Calf & Our Catholic Mass: 3 Reasons Man Cannot Invent the Liturgy

by on

Read the source:  http://www.stpeterslist.com/10575/the-golden-calf-our-catholic-mass-3-reason-man-cannot-invent-the-liturgy/

Spirit of the Liturgy

Listers, “man himself cannot simply ‘make’ worship.” This is the opening line of arguably the two most powerful paragraphs in Cardinal Ratzinger’s The Spirit of the Liturgy. SPL has previously promoted this seminal work in The 2 Books by Cardinal Ratzinger that Will Change Your Life. While that list focuses on the greater context in which the book is written – the Queen of the Sciences and the role of the liturgy – this list presents a small but potent pericope.

Cardinal Ratzinger reads the Golden Calf episode in Exodus 32 not as the people of Israel rebelling against God directly, but rather after losing hope in Moses, the people decided to worship God in their own way. The beginning of the chapter lays out the mindset of the Israelites, especially verses 4-5.

1-  When the people saw that Moses delayed to come down from the mountain, the people gathered themselves together to Aaron, and said to him, “Up, make us gods, who shall go before us; as for this Moses, the man who brought us up out of the land of Egypt, we do not know what has become of him.” 2 -And Aaron said to them, “Take off the rings of gold which are in the ears of your wives, your sons, and your daughters, and bring them to me.” 3 -So all the people took off the rings of gold which were in their ears, and brought them to Aaron. 4 -And he received the gold at their hand, and fashioned it with a graving tool, and made a molten calf; and they said, “These are your gods, O Israel, who brought you up out of the land of Egypt!” 5 -When Aaron saw this, he built an altar before it; and Aaron made proclamation and said, “Tomorrow shall be a feast to the LORD.” 6 And they rose up early on the morrow, and offered burnt offerings and brought peace offerings; and the people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to play.

The good Cardinal uses this chapter to discuss the distinction between the liturgy given by God and the liturgy created by man. As a point of caution, it is too easy for a Catholic reader to superficially acknowledge the Cardinal’s words as a condemnation of Protestantism. While they do condemn those who fabricate their own faith, Cardinal Ratzinger’s purpose in writing the work is to show Catholics what a proper “spirit of the liturgy” should be.

The Catholic liturgy is not in danger of being hijacked by Protestants; it was and still is in danger of being made protestant by Catholics.

The following presents the text verbatim (pp. 21-23) with supplemented enumerated titles and  highlighted quotes.

"Worshipping the Golden Calf." - Fucas van Leyden, a selection.

1. What Man Cannot Make

“Man himself cannot simply ‘make’ worship. If God does not reveal himself, man is clutching empty space. Moses says to Pharaoh: “[W]e do not know with what we must serve the Lord” (Ex 10:26). These words display a fundamental law of all liturgy. When God does not reveal himself, man can, from the sense of God within him, build altars ‘to the unknown god’ (cf. Acts 17:23). He can reach out toward God in his thinking and try to feel his way toward him.”

[Liturgy] cannot spring from imagination, our own creativity – then it would remain just a cry in the dark or mere self affirmation.

“But real liturgy implies that God responds and reveals how we can worship him. In any form, liturgy includes some kind of ‘institution’. It cannot spring from imagination, our own creativity – then it would remain just a cry in the dark or mere self affirmation. Liturgy implies a real relationship with Another, who reveals himself to us and gives our existence a new direction.”

 

The Golden Calf 3

2. The Golden Calf

“In the Old Testament there is a series of very impressive testimonies to the truth that the liturgy is not a matter of ‘what you please.’ Nowhere is this more dramatically evident than in the narrative of the golden calf (strictly speaking, ‘bull calf’). The cult conducted by the high priest Aaron is not meant to serve any of the false gods of the heathen. The apostasy is more subtle. There is no obvious turning away from God to the false gods. Outwardly, the people remain completely attached to the same God. They want to glorify the God who led Israel out of Egypt and believe that they may very properly represent his mysterious power in the image of a bull calf. Everything seems to be in order. Presumably even the ritual is in complete conformity to the rubrics. And yet it is a falling away from the worship of God to idolatry.”

Worship is not longer going up to God, but drawing God into one’s own world. He must be there when he is needed, and he must be the kind of God that is needed. Man is using God, and in reality, even if it is not outwardly discernible, he is placing himself above God.

“This apostasy, which outwardly is scarcely perceptible, has two causes. First there is a violation of the prohibition against images. The people cannot cope with the invisible, remote, and mysterious God. They want to bring him down into their own world, into what they can see and understand. Worship is no longer going up to God, but drawing God into one’s own world. He must be there when he is needed, and he must be the kind of God that is needed. Man is using God, and in reality, even if it is not outwardly discernible, he is placing himself above God.

"The Golden Calf" - Tissot

3. Banal Self-Gratification

“This gives us a clue to the second point. The worship of the golden calf is a self-generated cult. When Moses stays away for too long, and God himself becomes inaccessible, the people just fetch him back. Worship becomes a feast that the community gives itself, a festival of self-affirmation. Instead of being worship of God, it becomes a circle closed in on itself: eating, drinking, and making merry. The dance around the golden calf is an imagine of this self-seeking worship. It is a kind of banal self-gratification. The narrative of the golden calf is a warning about any kind of self-initiated and self-seeking worship.”

Worship becomes a feast that the community gives itself, a festival of self-affirmation.

“Ultimately, it is no longer concerned with God but with giving oneself a nice little alternative world, manufactured from one’s own resources. Then liturgy really does become pointless, just fooling around. Or still worse, it becomes an apostasy from the living God, an apostasy in sacral disguise. All that is left in the end is frustration, a feeling of emptiness. There is no experience of that liberation which always takes place when man encounters the living God.”

Bishop Galido: Unchastity ‘wrong’ regardless of gender – Homosexual or Hetrosexual

Bishop Galido: Unchastity ‘wrong’ regardless of gender – Homosexual or Hetrosexual

ILIGAN City, Oct. 19, 2014—A Catholic prelate maintains that impure deeds and thoughts are sinful.

While he confirmed sexual activities between persons of the same gender are wrong, Iligan Bishop Elenito R. Galido pointed out sexual relationships even between a heterosexual male and a heterosexual female are no less immoral, if these take place outside the sacrament of matrimony.

In an interview over Church-run Radyo Veritas, Galido clarified immorality is not the monopoly of a specific gender.

Anything perpetrated against chastity and morality, he explained, whether the person doing it is straight or gay, constitutes immorality.

“That is a fundamental moral law. That’s why we do not immediately judge based on one’s sexual orientation alone,” the prelate said.

Quoting Pope Francis, Galido shared,”Who am I to judge?”

The bishop, however, said that although the Argentine pontiff may have a positive view of homosexual persons, as opposed to homosexual acts, the Church’s teachings on same-sex marriage remains unchanged.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC) is clear in this regard, calling homosexual acts “contrary to the natural law” (CCC: 2357).

It continues, “They close the sexual act to the gift of life. They do not proceed from a genuine affective and sexual complementarity. Under no circumstances can they be approved.”

CCC: 2358 reads, “Every sign of unjust discrimination in their regard should be avoided. These persons are called to fulfill God’s will in their lives and, if they are Christians, to unite to the sacrifice of the Lord’s Cross the difficulties they may encounter from their condition.”

CCC: 2359 adds, “Homosexual persons are called to chastity. By the virtues of self-mastery that teach them inner freedom, at times by the support of disinterested friendship, by prayer and sacramental grace, they can and should gradually and resolutely approach Christian perfection.” (Raymond A. Sebastián)

Read the source: http://www.cbcpnews.com/cbcpnews/?p=43335

FBI Homosexuality. Many believe the Freemasons are simply a centuries-old charitable fraternity. However, the Catholic Church has consistently condemned Freemasonry more than any other error in its history because it promotes indifferentism, naturalism, communism, and other dangerous philosophies.

Please click this link to watch the video on FBI Homosexuality by Michael Voris

Homosexuality, the Grave Evil Presented as Good, Part 1

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexuality: Grave Evil Presented as Good, Part 1

Homosexuality, Question and Answer Part 2

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexuality, Q & A

Homosexuals and Freemasons inside the Church

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexual and Freemasons inside the Church by Michael Voris

“The Rite of Sodomy” Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Please click this link to watch the video on “The Rite of Sodomy” Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Mic’d Up “Pink Money and the Homosexual Mafia” 

Please click this link to watch the video on Mic’d Up “Pink Money and the Homosexual Mafia”

Michael Voris gives a series of short talks, answering questions coming in response to his talk on homosexuality in Nigeria.

In this talk from Nigeria, Michael Voris speaks about the grave evil presented as good – homosexuality. “Homosexuality refers to relations between men or between women who experience an exclusive or predominant sexual attraction toward persons of the same sex. It has taken great variety of forms through the centuries and in different cultures. Its psychological genesis remains largely unexplained. Basing itself on Sacred Scripture, which presents homosexual acts as acts of grave depravity (cf. Gen 19:1-29; Rom 1:24-27; 1 Cor 6:10; 1 Tim 1:10), tradition has always declared that ‘homosexual acts are intinsically disordered” (CDF, Persona humana 8). They are contrary to the natural law. They close the sexual act to the gift of life. They do not proceed from a genuine affective and sexual complementarity. Under no circumstances can they be approved” (CCC: 2357).

Cardinal Burke: The “Relatio Synodi” is “a significant improvement over the text of the ‘Relatio post Disceptationem'”

On attempts by some bishops to change Church teaching: “In my judgment, a false notion of the relationship of faith and culture underlies the agenda.”
by Carl E. Olson, October 19,2014
Cardinal Vincent Nichols of Westminster, England, talks with Cardinal Raymond L. Burke, prefect of the Supreme Court of the Apostolic Signature, as they leave the concluding session of the extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family at the Vatican Oct. 18. Also pictured is Italian Cardinal Carlo Caffarra of Bologna, center. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

In a third short interview with CWR, conducted by e-mail late yesterday, Cardinal Raymond L. Burke, the Prefect of the Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura, offers his impression of the Relatio Synodi, comments on reports that the Synod has been a “setback” for Pope Francis, and remarks on the push by certain European bishops to change various Church teaching.

CWR: What reactions or impressions do you have to the Relatio Synodi? Do you think it provides an accurate summary and accounting of what the Synod discussed and expressed in its interventions and groups?

Cardinal Burke: Although I had hoped that more of the material from the small group of which I was a part [link] would be included in the Relatio Synodi, it is a significant improvement over the text of the Relatio post Disceptationem which was presented to the Synod Fathers on this past Monday.

Yes, I would say that it provides an accurate, if not complete, summary of the discussions in the Synod Hall and in the small groups.

CWR: Many in the secular media are presenting this as a blow to Pope Francis. For example, the BBC states, “Pope suffers synod setback on gays”. Is that a fair or accurate analysis of the situation? Is there really any evidence to suggest that the Holy Father’s wanted the Synod to push for more “openness” to those who identify as “gay/lesbian”, or that he wishes to relax Church teaching regarding homosexuality and “same sex unions”?

Cardinal Burke: It is a blow to those who wrote the material which did not reflect the Church’s teaching regarding the homosexual condition and homosexual acts, which implied that the Church wants now to relax its perennial teaching, and which tried to introduce material regarding so-called “same-sex unions” into the discussion of Christian marriage.

I have no evidence regarding the Pope’s thinking in the matter or regarding his alleged support of a relaxation of the Church’s teaching.

CWR: There is a widespread impression that certain European bishops are intent on getting Church teaching changed regarding homosexuality, homosexual unions, remarriage and Communion, contraception, and related issues. Is that a reasonable impression? If so, what underlies such an agenda, in your opinion?

Cardinal Burke: The impression is reasonable, as long as it is limited to certain European bishops, because a number of European bishops have been clear and strong in upholding the Church’s teaching regarding all of these questions. Cardinal Walter Kasper has been the most outspoken supporter of change of the Church’s discipline in these matters, even while he insists that he is not proposing a change in the Church’s teaching.

Of course, in the Catholic Church, her discipline is the mirror of her doctrine, and, therefore, you cannot uphold the Church’s teaching, while proposing a discipline contrary to the teaching.

In my judgment, a false notion of the relationship of faith and culture underlies the agenda. Those who urge the agenda typically describe in detail all of the tragic aspects of the total secularization of culture and then propose that the Church has to change her language and discipline, in order to take into account the radical changes in culture.

For example, one prelate made the comment that, since Saint John Paul II’s Apostolic Exhortation on the Family, Familiaris Consortio [link], is some thirty years old, it is no longer adequate to address our situation. But Familiaris Consortio presents the perennial teaching of the Church and is, therefore, as pertinent to the situation of our day as it was pertinent in the 1980s.

A correct view of the relationship of faith and culture tries to see how the Church can more effectively, that is more clearly and strongly, address the unchanging truths of the faith to the present situation. Frequently, a faulty hermeneutic which was applied to the teaching of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council—claiming to follow the so-called “spirit of the Council” set forth in the Address of Saint John XXIII, Gaudet Mater Ecclesia, to open the Council on October 11, 1962, is used to justify the false notion.

The false notion of the relationship of faith and culture must be aggressively addressed to stop the spreading of a most harmful confusion.

Related on CWR:

“Cardinal Burke: Synod’s mid-term report “lacks a solid foundation in the Sacred Scriptures and the Magisterium” (Oct. 14, 2014)

“Cardinal Burke to CWR: confirms transfer, praises pushback, addresses controversy over remarks by Cardinal Kasper” (Oct. 18, 2014)

Bishops revolt against Synod manipulation: Only 3 in 10 support Kasper proposal, says Cardinal Pell

Bishops revolt against Synod manipulation: Only 3 in 10 support Kasper proposal, says Cardinal Pell

Cardinal: Synod says no to ‘secular agenda’

Published on Oct 16, 2014

RELATED STORY: http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stor…

Cardinal George Pell discusses the ongoing debate inside the synod on the family.

Cardinal George Pell, a leading voice for orthodoxy in the ongoing Synod of Bishops on the family in Rome, has said that  small group of “radicals” has failed in their attempt to push the Synod to accept homosexuality, cohabitation, and other changes of Catholic moral teaching.

Cardinal Pell said, “We’re not giving in to the secular agenda. We’re not collapsing in a heap. We’ve got no intention of following those radical elements in all the Christian churches including some of the Catholic Churches in one or two countries and going out of business.”

“If people are heading in the wrong direction, it’s no virtue for the Church to say that’s good. A lot of people that are outside and don’t accept our views will welcome it,” he said. “But certainly not the people in the pews, the good people.”

Today’s news in the Italian press is full of the story of the general revolt of the Synod bishops against what they argue are the attempts made by the Synod’s own administration to control the message and promote the views of this small “radical” cadre.

In his interview with Catholic News Service, Cardinal Pell, a member of Pope Francis’ inner council and the prefect of the newly formed Secretariat of the Economy, all but identified a cabal working to control the Synod.

Cardinal Pell said the issue of giving Communion to divorced and remarried couples is supported by “very few, certainly not the majority of the synod fathers.” But he added that “it’s only at the tip of the iceberg. It’s a stalking horse. They want wider changes: recognition of civil unions, recognition of homosexual unions.”

“The Church cannot go in that direction,” because “it would be a capitulation from the beauties and strengths of the Catholic tradition.”

Despite the attempts by the Synod’s Secretary General, Cardinal Lorenzo Baldisseri, to restrict the message of the bishops’ working groups this week to summaries, written by himself, the bishops are reported to have risen up as a body and demanded that a full report of their deliberations be released to the public. After a series of speeches against Baldisseri’s proposal, an announcement by Father Federico Lombardi that the bishops’ full documents were to be published was met with a standing ovation while Pope Francis is said to have remained silent and impassive.

“The Synod fathers decided unanimously this morning to publish the summaries, the ‘relationes’ from the different working groups,” Cardinal Pell said, “because we wanted the Catholic people to know actually what was going on in talking about marriage and the family. And by and large, I think people will be immensely reassured.”

The story of the bishops’ revolt is the talk of Rome, with a report by Matteo Matzuzzi in the Italian newspaper Il Foglio, saying that the offer of yet another summary of their discussions was the last straw for the bishops. Cardinal Pell spoke first, but was followed by a long line of others, including the Archbishop of Brussels, Andre-Joseph Léonard; Cardinal Wilfrid Napier of Durban, South Africa; and the Cardinal Secretary of State, Pietro Parolin.

Cardinal Christoph Schönborn told the press, “The decision to render public the relationes of the circuli was taken by large majority.” Il Foglionoted that the texts “are clear, and go in an opposite direction as the one upheld by Cardinal Walter Kasper.”

Contrary to Cardinal Kasper’s persistent claims that a majority approve his plans, Cardinal Pell told Catholic News Service that only three out of ten of the Synod working groups have been supportive of Cardinal Kasper’s proposal.

The first document from the Synod to be published, called the “Relatio,” issued on Monday, suggested, among other troubling passages, that the bishops wanted the Church to learn to “value and accept” the homosexual “orientation.” Cardinal Pell called this document “tendentious,” and “skewed.”

“It didn’t represent accurately the feelings of the Synod fathers, because in the immediate reaction to it…three quarters of those who spoke had some problems with the document,” the cardinal said.

Pell criticized the Relatio again, saying, “A major absence was scriptural teaching. A major absence was the treatment of the Church tradition. It was as though there was an idealized vision of every imperfect [marital] situation.”

“One father said to me about the earlier document, that he wouldn’t want his young adult children to read it because they’d be confused. And that was said in some of the working groups,” the cardinal added.

“Christ’s teaching on marriage,” he said, “is not put there as a burden, it works in the long run. It’s there to protect us. And the secret for all Catholic vitality is fidelity to the teachings of Christ and to the tradition of the Church.”

He said that Pope Francis emphasis on these teachings being “lived out in mercy, and love,” have been “a wonderful emphasis.”

“Our task now is to ask people to pause, to pray, to catch their breath. To realize there’s going to be no abandonment of Catholic doctrine and to work to diminish the divisions and to prevent any radicalization of the factions or points of view,” Cardinal Pell said.

Hilary White

Crazy Cardinals, Synod on Marriage and Family, Finding Peace

Crazy Cardinals, Synod on Marriage and Family, Finding Peace

Have you been following all the crazy news about the Synod of Bishops for Marriage and the Family and the Relatio document from last week?

Do you have questions about how the Church is handling homosexuality? Has it bothered you? Are you concerned? Below is a video explaining some of the lesser known details, the crazy things cardinals say, how Saint Paul handled homosexuality in the first century, and why you should not lose your peace over this situation.

Please take a moment to watch this video:

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Question: Please share your thoughts about the Synod of Bishops for Marriage and the Family (but be charitable in your feedback, please). You can leave a comment by clicking here.

FBI Homosexuality. Many believe the Freemasons are simply a centuries-old charitable fraternity. However, the Catholic Church has consistently condemned Freemasonry more than any other error in its history because it promotes indifferentism, naturalism, communism, and other dangerous philosophies.

Please click this link to watch the video on FBI Homosexuality by Michael Voris

Homosexuality, the Grave Evil Presented as Good, Part 1

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexuality: Grave Evil Presented as Good, Part 1

Homosexuality, Question and Answer Part 2

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Homosexuals and Freemasons inside the Church

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexual and Freemasons inside the Church by Michael Voris

“The Rite of Sodomy” Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Please click this link to watch the video on “The Rite of Sodomy” Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Mic’d Up “Pink Money and the Homosexual Mafia” 

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Michael Voris gives a series of short talks, answering questions coming in response to his talk on homosexuality in Nigeria.

In this talk from Nigeria, Michael Voris speaks about the grave evil presented as good – homosexuality. “Homosexuality refers to relations between men or between women who experience an exclusive or predominant sexual attraction toward persons of the same sex. It has taken great variety of forms through the centuries and in different cultures. Its psychological genesis remains largely unexplained. Basing itself on Sacred Scripture, which presents homosexual acts as acts of grave depravity (cf. Gen 19:1-29; Rom 1:24-27; 1 Cor 6:10; 1 Tim 1:10), tradition has always declared that ‘homosexual acts are intinsically disordered” (CDF, Persona humana 8). They are contrary to the natural law. They close the sexual act to the gift of life. They do not proceed from a genuine affective and sexual complementarity. Under no circumstances can they be approved” (CCC: 2357).

Abortion with Movie: From Old Testament, New Testament & Fathers of the Church to the present day.

Abortion with Movie: From Old Testament, New Testament & Fathers of the Church to the present day.

By Catholic Say Staff, October 21,2014

Read the source: http://catholicsay.com/abortion/

Abortion: The Silent Scream (Full Length)

Uploaded on Jan 27, 2012

ABORTION – THE SILENT SCREAM COMPLETE VERSION (with permission from APF). Republished with Permission from Roy Tidwell of American Portrait Films as long as the following credits are shown above.

From the OT, through the NT till the present day the Church has taught that abortion is intrinsically evil, equal to murder since it is a deliberate termination of another life. The Church believes, as taught in the Scriptures that life begins from conception. If the Child in the womb is able to “grow”, then that means the child’s alive, and it cannot be alive lest it has a soul, its animating principle.

John Paul II’s Evangelium Vitae (no 62) says:

The more recent Papal Magisterium has vigorously reaffirmed this common doctrine. Pius XI in particular, in his Encyclical Casti Connubii, rejected the specious justifications of abortion.  Pius XII excluded all direct abortion, i.e., every act tending directly to destroy human life in the womb “whether such destruction is intended as an end or only as a means to an end”. John XXIII reaffirmed that human life is sacred because “from its very beginning it directly involves God’s creative activity”. The Second Vatican Council, as mentioned earlier, sternly condemned abortion: “From the moment of its conception life must be guarded with the greatest care, while abortion and infanticide are unspeakable crimes”. The Church’s canonical discipline, from the earliest centuries, has inflicted penal sanctions on those guilty of abortion. This practice, with more or less severe penalties, has been confirmed in various periods of history. The 1917 Code of Canon Law punished abortion with excommunication.  The revised canonical legislation continues this tradition when it decrees that “a person who actually procures an abortion incurs automatic (latae sententiae) excommunication”. The excommu- nication affects all those who commit this crime with knowledge of the penalty attached, and thus includes those accomplices without whose help the crime would not have been committed.  By this reiterated sanction, the Church makes clear that abortion is a most serious and dangerous crime, thereby encouraging those who commit it to seek without delay the path of conversion. In the Church the purpose of the penalty of excommunication is to make an individual fully aware of the gravity of a certain sin and then to foster genuine conversion and repentance. Given such unanimity in the doctrinal and disciplinary tradition of the Church, Paul VI was able to declare that this tradition is unchanged and unchangeable.  Therefore, by the authority which Christ conferred upon Peter and his Successors, in communion with the Bishops-who on various occasions have condemned abortion and who in the aforementioned consultation, albeit dispersed throughout the world, have shown unanimous agreement concerning this doctrine-I declare that direct abortion, that is, abortion willed as an end or as a means, always constitutes a grave moral disorder, since it is the deliberate killing of an innocent human being. This doctrine is based upon the natural law and upon the written Word of God, is transmitted by the Church’s Tradition and taught by the ordinary and universal Magisterium.  No circumstance, no purpose, no law whatsoever can ever make licit an act which is intrinsically illicit, since it is contrary to the Law of God which is written in every human heart, knowable by reason itself, and proclaimed by the Church.

The Didache

“The second commandment of the teaching: You shall not murder. You shall not commit adultery. You shall not seduce boys. You shall not commit fornication. You shall not steal. You shall not practice magic. You shall not use potions. You shall not procure [an] abortion, nor destroy a newborn child” (Didache 2:1–2 [A.D. 70]).

The Letter of Barnabas

“The way of light, then, is as follows. If anyone desires to travel to the appointed place, he must be zealous in his works. The knowledge, therefore, which is given to us for the purpose of walking in this way, is the following. . . . Thou shalt not slay the child by procuring abortion; nor, again, shalt thou destroy it after it is born” (Letter of Barnabas 19 [A.D. 74]).

The Apocalypse of Peter

“And near that place I saw another strait place . . . and there sat women. . . . And over against them many children who were born to them out of due time sat crying. And there came forth from them rays of fire and smote the women in the eyes. And these were the accursed who conceived and caused abortion” (The Apocalypse of Peter 25 [A.D. 137]).

Athenagoras

“What man of sound mind, therefore, will affirm, while such is our character, that we are murderers?
. . . [W]hen we say that those women who use drugs to bring on abortion commit murder, and will have to give an account to God for the abortion, on what principle should we commit murder? For it does not belong to the same person to regard the very fetus in the womb as a created being, and therefore an object of God’s care, and when it has passed into life, to kill it; and not to expose an infant, because those who expose them are chargeable with child-murder, and on the other hand, when it has been reared to destroy it” (A Plea for the Christians 35 [A.D. 177]).

Tertullian

“In our case, a murder being once for all forbidden, we may not destroy even the fetus in the womb, while as yet the human being derives blood from the other parts of the body for its sustenance. To hinder a birth is merely a speedier man-killing; nor does it matter whether you take away a life that is born, or destroy one that is coming to birth. That is a man which is going to be one; you have the fruit already in its seed” (Apology 9:8 [A.D. 197]).

“Among surgeons’ tools there is a certain instrument, which is formed with a nicely-adjusted flexible frame for opening the uterus first of all and keeping it open; it is further furnished with an annular blade, by means of which the limbs [of the child] within the womb are dissected with anxious but unfaltering care; its last appendage being a blunted or covered hook, wherewith the entire fetus is extracted by a violent delivery.

“There is also [another instrument in the shape of] a copper needle or spike, by which the actual death is managed in this furtive robbery of life: They give it, from its infanticide function, the name of embruosphaktes, [meaning] “the slayer of the infant,” which of course was alive. . . .

“[The doctors who performed abortions] all knew well enough that a living being had been conceived, and [they] pitied this most luckless infant state, which had first to be put to death, to escape being tortured alive” (The Soul 25 [A.D. 210]).

“Now we allow that life begins with conception because we contend that the soul also begins from conception; life taking its commencement at the same moment and place that the soul does” (ibid., 27).

“The law of Moses, indeed, punishes with due penalties the man who shall cause abortion [Ex. 21:22–24]” (ibid., 37).

Minucius Felix

“There are some [pagan] women who, by drinking medical preparations, extinguish the source of the future man in their very bowels and thus commit a parricide before they bring forth. And these things assuredly come down from the teaching of your [false] gods. . . . To us [Christians] it is not lawful either to see or hear of homicide” (Octavius 30 [A.D. 226]).

Hippolytus

“Women who were reputed to be believers began to take drugs to render themselves sterile, and to bind themselves tightly so as to expel what was being conceived, since they would not, on account of relatives and excess wealth, want to have a child by a slave or by any insignificant person. See, then, into what great impiety that lawless one has proceeded, by teaching adultery and murder at the same time!” (Refutation of All Heresies [A.D. 228]).

Council of Ancyra

“Concerning women who commit fornication, and destroy that which they have conceived, or who are employed in making drugs for abortion, a former decree excluded them until the hour of death, and to this some have assented. Nevertheless, being desirous to use somewhat greater lenity, we have ordained that they fulfill ten years [of penance], according to the prescribed degrees” (canon 21 [A.D. 314]).

Basil the Great

“Let her that procures abortion undergo ten years’ penance, whether the embryo were perfectly formed, or not” (First Canonical Letter, canon 2 [A.D. 374]).

“He that kills another with a sword, or hurls an axe at his own wife and kills her, is guilty of willful murder; not he who throws a stone at a dog, and unintentionally kills a man, or who corrects one with a rod, or scourge, in order to reform him, or who kills a man in his own defense, when he only designed to hurt him. But the man, or woman, is a murderer that gives a philtrum, if the man that takes it dies upon it; so are they who take medicines to procure abortion; and so are they who kill on the highway, and rapparees” (ibid., canon 8).

John Chrysostom

“Wherefore I beseech you, flee fornication. . . . Why sow where the ground makes it its care to destroy the fruit?—where there are many efforts at abortion?—where there is murder before the birth? For even the harlot you do not let continue a mere harlot, but make her a murderess also. You see how drunkenness leads to prostitution, prostitution to adultery, adultery to murder; or rather to a something even worse than murder. For I have no name to give it, since it does not take off the thing born, but prevents its being born. Why then do thou abuse the gift of God, and fight with his laws, and follow after what is a curse as if a blessing, and make the chamber of procreation a chamber for murder, and arm the woman that was given for childbearing unto slaughter? For with a view to drawing more money by being agreeable and an object of longing to her lovers, even this she is not backward to do, so heaping upon thy head a great pile of fire. For even if the daring deed be hers, yet the causing of it is thine” (Homilies on Romans 24 [A.D. 391]).

Jerome

“I cannot bring myself to speak of the many virgins who daily fall and are lost to the bosom of the Church, their mother. . . . Some go so far as to take potions, that they may insure barrenness, and thus murder human beings almost before their conception. Some, when they find themselves with child through their sin, use drugs to procure abortion, and when, as often happens, they die with their offspring, they enter the lower world laden with the guilt not only of adultery against Christ but also of suicide and child murder” (Letters 22:13 [A.D. 396]).

The Apostolic Constitutions

“Thou shalt not use magic. Thou shalt not use witchcraft; for he says, ‘You shall not suffer a witch to live’ [Ex. 22:18]. Thou shall not slay thy child by causing abortion, nor kill that which is begotten. . . . [I]f it be slain, [it] shall be avenged, as being unjustly destroyed” (Apostolic Constitutions 7:3 [A.D. 400]).

The Cost of Abortion & Contraception Deception

Michael Voris talks an in-depth discussion of the true, financial cost of abortion and its effects to the United States. “The inalienable rights of the person must be recognized and respected by civil society and the political authority. These human rights depend neither on single individuals nor on parents; nor do they represent a concession made by society and the state; they belong to human nature and are inherent in the person by virtue of the creative act from which the person took his origin. Among such fundamental rights one should mention in this regard every human being’s right to life and physical integrity from the moment of conception until death” (CDF, Donum vitae III; CCC: 2273).

Please click this link to watch the video on The Cost of Abortion & Media

FBI Contraception Deception.

Modern man has divorced sex from procreation through his embrace of contraception. This Contraception Deception within the CatholicChurch has come about by a near total betrayal of the faithful by their shepherds and leaders.

Please click this link to watch the video on Contraception Deception

Contraception & the New Dark Age, Part 1 by Dr. Martin Brenner

Where we are and how we got here. Join Dr. Martin Brenner for this first of a four-part series on the moral evils of contraception.

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Contraception and Salvation, Part 2 by Dr. Martin Brenner

Join Dr. Martin Brenner for the second of a four-part series on the  moral evils of contraception.

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Contraception and Sanctification. Part 3 by Dr. Martin Brenner

Prayer and the Liturgy. Dr. Martin Brenner discusses how contraception is a detriment to our spiritual lives and marital relationships. The infallibility of the Church’s teaching on this matter is also discussed.

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Contraception and Sexual Ethics. Part 4 by Dr. Martin Brenner

The Proper Practice. Dr. Martin Brenner describes the importance of spreading the message about the sexual ethic and goes into detail about the alternatives to contraception and their practices.

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CIA: The Rockefeller Foundation

Please click this link to watch the video on CIA: The Rockefeller Foundation

We are used to thinking of the Rockefellers as simply a byword for wealth, power and financial success. Perhaps we might think of them as determined businessmen or see them as great philanthropists. But the truth is far different; the Rockefeller Foundation is actively undermining the Catholic Church, and in the process, attempting to erase man’s natural orientation to the eternal.

Global Warming Unmasked

Please click this link to watch the video on Global Warming Unmasked by Michael Voris

Are the environmental movements and groups simply devoted to laudable, correct stewardship of God’s creation, or do they have a more sinister, hidden agenda? Is “global warming” being used as an excuse for something far darker? Is the final goal of the liberal elites behind the push of junk science population control, eugenics and Gaia worship?

Mic’d Up “Is Contraception Killing the Church?”

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This week on Mic’d Up we’ll be tackling the terrible scourge of Contraception on the Church. Michael Hichborn and Rey Flores from American Life League will join us to expose Catholic Relief Services complicity with Organizations who support contraception and to Discuss The Pill Kills Day of Action 2014. Also joining us will be Lynn Mills who will be discussing the continued prayer rally at Providence Park Hospital in the Archdiocese of Detroit because of their complicity in abortion, contraception and sterilization. Following that same thread we’ll break down the announcement from Detroit Archbishop Allen Vigneron concerning the crisis of parish closings facing Detroit. Also dropping by will be author James Kalb, to discuss the plague of pluralism on the Church’s Hierarchy.