The Gospel and Gay “Marriage”

The Gospel and Gay “Marriage”

By Kevin Sanders

Gay “marriage” seems to be a hot topic right now since some parts of the world are changing their laws to make it legal (including here in the USA).

My regular readers know where I stand on this, but I want to reiterate what the Bible teaches for those who may be searching for the truth. What I’m about to say may not be popular, but that doesn’t really concern me.

What does the Bible really say about homosexuality? Let’s first consider three points:

The Biblical Foundation:

We need look no further than the second chapter of Genesis to see God’s original plan for love, sex and marriage:

That is why a man leaves his father and mother and is united to his wife, and they become one flesh. –Genesis 2:24

There you have it: God’s designed sex to be experienced by one man and one woman in a covenant of marriage. He did not make a mistake in His original plan.

The Biblical Condemnation:

The Old Testament law lists homosexual behavior among practices unacceptable to God:

Do not have sexual relations with a man as one does with a woman; that is detestable.
–Leviticus 18:22

The Book of Romans (New Testament) describes homosexual behavior as “unnatural”:

Because of this, God gave them over to shameful lusts. Even their women exchanged natural sexual relations for unnatural ones. In the same way the men also abandoned natural relations with women and were inflamed with lust for one another. Men committed shameful acts with other men, and received in themselves the due penalty for their error.
–Romans 1:26-27

There are other Scriptures, but I’ll get to that later.

The Lack of Biblical Celebration:

The Bible repeatedly celebrates the relationship between husband and wife. Proverbs puts it this way:

He who finds a wife finds what is good and receives favor from the LORD. 
–Proverbs 18:22

The Song of Solomon (also called Song of Songs) celebrates the sexual love and desire between a young bride and her husband:

Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth—
for your love is more delightful than wine.
Pleasing is the fragrance of your perfumes;
your name is like perfume poured out.
No wonder the young women love you!
Take me away with you—let us hurry!
Let the king bring me into his chambers.
-Song of Solomon 1:2-4

But you won’t find a single verse in the Bible celebrating homosexual acts/relationships—not one! No gay “weddings,” no “Born this Way” lyrics, no indication that God blesses or condones any kind of same-sex union.

You can try to twist the Scriptures any way you like, but the Biblical message is clear: God’s plan for love and sex has not changed.

I’ve explained the biblical foundation, the biblical condemnation, and the lack of biblical celebration in regards to homosexuality. Now let me share one more thing:

The Biblical Solution—The Gospel:

Is there any hope for those who struggle with same-sex attraction? Yes! It’s the same hope that is available to murderers, adulterers, drug addicts, alcoholics, liars, churchgoers, preachers, campus ministers, and bloggers. We all desperately needthe Gospelthe good news of a Savior who offers forgiveness to those who repent and believe.

Repent, then, and turn to God, so that your sins may be wiped out, that times of refreshing may come from the Lord 
-Acts 3:19

This gospel has been changing lives since the ancient church. We see it in Paul’s admonitions to the believers in Corinth:

Or do you not know that wrongdoers will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: Neither the sexually immoral nor idolaters nor adulterers nor men who have sex with men nor thieves nor the greedy nor drunkards nor slanderers nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God. And that is what some of you were. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God. 
-1st Corinthians 6:9-11

Pay careful attention to the last two sentences (vs. 11). Those trapped in all kinds of sins (including homosexual sins) where changed by the power of the gospel!

Here’s what grieves me about churches that condone gay “weddings”: they have ignored the biblical definition of sin. This kind of teaching leaves us with people professing to be Christian, yet rejecting the clear teachings of Scripture.

Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter. 
–Isaiah 5:20

Earlier I mentioned the word “repent.” This word indicates a change of mind and a change of direction in one’s life. Repentance is agreement with God on the nature of sin and my need for the life-changing gospel. I don’t need salvation if I can conveniently ignore or redefine sin. I don’t need to repent from sexual immorality if there is no such thing!

Let me summarize the Gospel and how it relates to sexual purity:

1. All of us have sinned and fallen short. God’s holy nature required payment (sacrifice) to atone for our sins. God does not ignore sin or change his mind about it. Instead, He has dealt with it in a way that his consistent with His character. Salvation is offered freely to those who repent and believe in the gospel:

For everyone has sinned; we all fall short of God’s glorious standard. Yet God, with undeserved kindness, declares that we are righteous. He did this through Christ Jesus when he freed us from the penalty for our sins. For God presented Jesus as the sacrifice for sin. People are made right with God when they believe that Jesus sacrificed his life, shedding his blood 
–Romans 3:23-25

2. Followers of Jesus Christ are called to be holy. This means avoiding all forms of sexual immorality:

God’s will is for you to be holy, so stay away from all sexual sin. Then each of you will control his own body and live in holiness and honor—not in lustful passion like the pagans who do not know God and his ways. Never harm or cheat a Christian brother in this matter by violating his wife, for the Lord avenges all such sins, as we have solemnly warned you before. God has called us to live holy lives, not impure lives. Therefore, anyone who refuses to live by these rules is not disobeying human teaching but is rejecting God, who gives his Holy Spirit to you. 
-1st Thessalonians 4:3-8

Responding to Objections:

I’ve decided to expand this post a little in order to respond to some of the most common objections to the traditional interpretation of the Scriptures.

Some object to the quotation of Old Testament law, arguing that we (Christians) no longer practice the entire law.  Leviticus also has commandments against wearing clothing made from two different types of thread (Leviticus 19:19), for example.  I can’t fully address the Old and New Covenants in one post, so I’ll explain it this way: the sexual ethic, built on the foundation of Genesis 2:24, is consistent throughout the Scriptures.  We no longer practice some of the ceremonial laws of the Old Testament, but we do continue to follow the its moral laws.

Why didn’t Jesus ever directly address homosexuality?  Because his ministry was primarily to a Jewish audience that would have already understood the teachings of the Old Testament.  But Jesus did define marriage as a lifelong covenant between one man and one woman (Matthew 19:4-9), referring back to Genesis 2:24.  Jesus also listed “sexual immorality” among the “evil things” that defile a person (Mark 7:21-23).   The Greek word we translate into “sexual immorality” comes from the root word porneia (from which we get the term pornography).  This term referred to any form of sex outside of marriage between a man and a woman. Jesus never directlyaddressed incest, zoophilia, or child sacrifice (all of which are also mentioned in Leviticus 18), yet it would be foolish to assume he approved of these practices.

Paul  address the issue of homosexuality in more explicit terms because he ministered to Gentiles (non-Jews; pagans).  But some have challenged the translation of 1st Corinthians 6:9 and 1st Timothy 1:10.  The word translated “men who have sex with men (NIV), or “men who practice homosexuality” (ESV) is the Greek wordarsenokoitai.  It is an unusual word, but it isn’t really that difficult to explain.  Paul simply combines two words from the Greek translation of the Old Testament (the Septuagint): aresno (man), and koitai (to lie with–from which we get the English termcoitus).  Both words appear in Leviticus 18:22.  Paul was reiterating the Old Testament prohibition of homosexual sin.

You may wonder why there are relatively few references to homosexuality in the Scriptures.  I think the answer is pretty simple–it’s the same reason that most of my articles regarding sexual purity are geared towards heterosexuals: sexual immorality between men and women is a lot more common than same-sex acts.

Final Thoughts:

I’m not arguing that God has some special disdain for homosexuals–He doesn’t (and I don’t either).  Homosexual acts are just one way we (human beings) have rebelled against God’s original design for sexual intimacy.

I’m sure some of you reading this post are still convinced I’m wrong.  If nothing else I hope I have helped you understand why Christians believe marriage should only be between a man and a woman.

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Thirteenth Week in Ordinary Time & 1st Martyrs of the Church of Rome, June 30,2015

Readings & Reflections: Tuesday of the Thirteenth Week in Ordinary Time & 1st Martyrs of the Church of Rome, June 30,2015

On July 19, A.D. 64, fire broke out in Rome. Flames rapidly engulfed the city. When public opinion turned against the Emperor Nero, he blamed the fire on the Christians and had them brutally murdered in his private gardens. According to the historian Tacitus, “Mockery of every sort accompanied their deaths. Covered with the skins of beasts, they were torn by dogs and perished, or were nailed to crosses, or were doomed to the flames and burnt, to serve as a nightly illumination, when daylight had expired.” Pope Clement called their sacrifice “the finest example of endurance in the midst of many indignities and tortures.”

AMDG+

Opening Prayer

Dear Jesus, Most often when trials and adversities come into our life, we are frightened of the terrible things, real and imagined, occurring in our lives. Lord Jesus, bless, us with faith and the strength that our fear is not necessary. Enable our hearts to rest in You. Make us believe always that with You in our hearts, the storms of our hearts will be made calm and peace will be upon us. In your Name, we hope and pray. Amen.

Reading I
Gn 19:15-29

As dawn was breaking, the angels urged Lot on, saying, “On your way! Take with you your wife and your two daughters who are here,
or you will be swept away in the punishment of Sodom.” When he hesitated, the men, by the LORD’s mercy, seized his hand and the hands of his wife and his two daughters and led them to safety outside the city. As soon as they had been brought outside, he was told:
“Flee for your life! Don’t look back or stop anywhere on the Plain.
Get off to the hills at once, or you will be swept away.” “Oh, no, my lord!” Lot replied, “You have already thought enough of your servant
to do me the great kindness of intervening to save my life. But I cannot flee to the hills to keep the disaster from overtaking me,
and so I shall die. Look, this town ahead is near enough to escape to.
It’s only a small place. Let me flee there—it’s a small place, is it not?—that my life may be saved.” “Well, then,” he replied, “I will also grant you the favor you now ask. I will not overthrow the town you speak of.  Hurry, escape there! I cannot do anything until you arrive there.” That is why the town is called Zoar.

The sun was just rising over the earth as Lot arrived in Zoar; at the same time the LORD rained down sulphurous fire upon Sodom and Gomorrah from the LORD out of heaven. He overthrew those cities and the whole Plain, together with the inhabitants of the cities and the produce of the soil. But Lot’s wife looked back, and she was turned into a pillar of salt.

Early the next morning Abraham went to the place where he had stood in the LORD’s presence. As he looked down toward Sodom and Gomorrah and the whole region of the Plain, he saw dense smoke over the land rising like fumes from a furnace.

Thus it came to pass: when God destroyed the Cities of the Plain,
he was mindful of Abraham by sending Lot away from the upheaval
by which God overthrew the cities where Lot had been living.

The word of the Lord.

Responsorial Psalm
Ps 26:2-3, 9-10, 11-12

R. (3a) O Lord, your mercy is before my eyes.
Search me, O LORD, and try me;
test my soul and my heart.
For your mercy is before my eyes,
and I walk in your truth.
R. O Lord, your mercy is before my eyes.

Gather not my soul with those of sinners,
nor with men of blood my life.
On their hands are crimes,
and their right hands are full of bribes.
R. O Lord, your mercy is before my eyes.

But I walk in integrity;
redeem me, and have mercy on me.
My foot stands on level ground;
in the assemblies I will bless the LORD.
R. O Lord, your mercy is before my eyes.

Gospel
Mt 8:23-27

As Jesus got into a boat, his disciples followed him. Suddenly a violent storm came up on the sea, so that the boat was being swamped by waves; but he was asleep. They came and woke him, saying, “Lord, save us! We are perishing!” He said to them, “Why are you terrified, O you of little faith?” Then he got up, rebuked the winds and the sea, and there was great calm. The men were amazed and said, “What sort of man is this, whom even the winds and the sea obey?”

The Gospel of the Lord.

Reflection 1 – Do not fear

In today’s gospel, we are all witness to two different dispositions amidst the violent storm that came up to sea.  We have Jesus who was not alarmed, who was at peace and “cool” about the whole thing (as a matter of fact, he was asleep and resting after a long day).  He was not apprehensive and panicky.  Neither did He show any signs of breakdown nor despair.  On the other hand, we see the early disciples truly gripped by fear.  They could not let the storm take its course but had to wake Jesus up and ask Him to do something about the storm.  They were so terrified of the possibility that their boat would sink and they would all drown in the middle of nowhere.

Jesus was able to properly handle the storm with great peace because He knew that the Father was always with Him and that He will never abandon Him..  He believed in His heart the Father so loved Him and that there will be nothing that will separate Him from the Father, not even that great storm on the sea.  Jesus had full trust in the Father that nothing could shake his faith in Him.

On the other hand, the disciples were completely taken aback by the storm and were fearful because they have not yet learned to completely entrust their lives to God.  Their faith was yet to be perfected.  They were so human in their reactions that Jesus used the storm to wake them up from their slumber and make them realize that their lives should be truly founded on God and His ways.

Today, just as Jesus brought His first disciples to a realization that life is a matter of faith and not reason, trust rather than human power and recklessness, He too wants us to believe and have faith in the Father as He did.  Jesus knows that perfection of our faith takes a lifetime that He gives us every opportunity to trust God and let Him prove Himself to us.  By opening our hearts to God, He works in us and makes us truly one with Him.  The more we are united to God, the stronger our faith will be and the greater our trust will be; the greater His peace and joy will dwell in our hearts.

Direction

Keep the Word on our lips at all times, meditating on it day and night.  Recall God’s faithfulness and victories in our lives.

Prayer

Heavenly Father, I surrender all my cares to You as I believe that You truly love me and that You will never abandon me. In Jesus, I hope and pray.  Amen.

Reflection 2 – Learned helplessness or trust?

Psychologist Martin Seligman made an interesting observation about animals that experienced pain. He demonstrated that if these animals were trained that receiving a shock was inevitable, they would not attempt to escape it even when the escape route became obvious. Instead, they would cower and cringe helplessly. Seligman called this phenomenon “learned helplessness.”

Lot and his wife were the epitome of learned helplessness in today’s first reading (Gen. 19:15-29). Under threat of fire and brimstone, Lot hesitates to leave his home and has to be dragged out by God’s messengers. His wife looks back, presumably in despair, and is turned into a pillar of salt. Lot cannot even make his way to the safety of the hills, but begs instead to be allowed to settle in a nearby town. If not for God’s response to Abraham’s earlier plea of mercy, Lot would have perished with the inhabitants of Sodom and Gomorrah.

The disciples in today’s gospel (Mt. 8:23-27) passage demonstrate a similar mentality. Knowing from experience that they have no control over the storm, they realize their helplessness and they panic: “Save us, Lord! We are about to die.” We might identify with their feelings of powerlessness, knowing what it is like when we believe we cannot change a situation that threatens us. We may become depressed or emotionally paralyzed when faced with illness, the loss of a loved one, or a threat to our livelihood.

What modern researchers have found about the human expereince of learned helplessness, though, is that it is largely dependent on how one explains the situation to oneself. Those who believe that the situation is personal, permanent or pervasive are likely to believe that they have no power to change it. Individuals who are optimistic in their view of difficulties are empowered by that optimism to change.

Christians know that ultimate power is in the hands of God. Like the disciples, we may cry, “Lord, save us!” But we know that we are never lost when we are in God’s hands. We need never cower or cringe like Lot; we need never give up hope for changing the things that put us in peril. (Source: Cecilia A. Felix. Weekday Homily Helps. Ohio: St. Anthony Messenger Press, June 30, 2009).

Reflection 3 – Risky Business

He said to them, “Why are you fearful, O you of little faith?” Then He arose and rebuked the winds and the sea, and there was a great calm. —Matthew 8:26

Denis Boyles knew it would be challenging to interview a man on a roller coaster—especially when the interview took place during an attempt to set a world’s record for continuous riding. After several times around the track, Denis was so overcome with fear he could hardly talk.

Then the man showed him how to use his body and feet to lean into the loops, twists, and turns. Writing in AARP Magazine, Boyles explained how that took away the terror. It also taught him a lesson about risk and fear. The roller coaster felt risky though it was quite safe. But driving his car to the amusement park posed a far greater risk of injury. Risk and fear are easily confused.

As Jesus and His disciples crossed the Sea of Galilee, a storm came up and waves swept over their boat. Incredibly, Jesus was asleep. The disciples woke Him and said, “Lord, save us! We are perishing!” (Matt. 8:25). In a gentle rebuke, Jesus asked, “‘Why are you fearful, O you of little faith?’ Then He arose and rebuked the winds and the sea, and there was a great calm” (v.26).

Like the disciples, the more we learn about Jesus, the more we trust Him. Our greatest risk is failing to depend on Him when life seems out of control.
David C. McCasland

But we see Jesus! Oh, what peace!
What balm for troubled heart!
His very name brings rest and calm
And bids the fears depart! —Adams

Keep your eyes on Jesus and you’ll soon lose sight of your fears (Source: Our Daily Bread, RBC Ministries).

Reflection 4 – Fear And Faith

Whenever I am afraid, I will trust in You. –Psalm 56:3

I agree with the statement “Faith chases out fear, or fear chases out faith.” But I also know that no believer is immune to panic or terror.

One Sunday evening the hair on my neck stood up and my heart rate soared as the driver of an oncoming car tried to pass another vehicle when he shouldn’t have and I was forced off the road.

Christians caught in a major earthquake have told me about the panic that seized them when it occurred.

Military people who have survived intense bombing attacks say that anyone who claims he wasn’t afraid at the time is either a liar or a fool.

It is not a sin to feel panic or terror in a life-threatening situation.

During a sudden, violent storm, the disciples were gently rebuked as having “little faith” because they should have known that nothing could harm them while Jesus was in their boat. But they did the right thing in calling out to Him, “Lord, save us!” (Mt. 8:25).

When fear strikes, think of God and consciously trust Him. The psalmist said, “Whenever I am afraid, I will trust in You” (Ps. 56:3).

Remember, fear will chase out faith, or faith will chase out fear.

I’ll walk this day in faith, dear Lord,
No foe nor storm I’ll fear;
Because I’m trusting in Your Word,
I know that You are near.

Faith can break the stranglehold of fear (Source: Our Daily Bread, RBC Ministries).

Reflection 5 – How to Face the Storms in Life

“Do not look forward in fear to the changes of life; rather, look to them with full hope that as they arise, God, whose very own you are, will lead you safely through all things; and when you cannot stand it, God will carry you in his arms.

“Do not fear what may happen tomorrow; the same understanding Father who cares for you today will take care of you then and every day.

“He will either shield you from suffering or will give you unfailing strength to bear it.

“Be at peace, and put aside all anxious thoughts and imaginations” (Source: St. Francis de Sales, +1622 A.D., Magnificat, Vol. 17, No. 4, June 2015, pp. 420-421).

Reflection 6 – First Martyrs of the Church of Rome (d. 68)

There were Christians in Rome within a dozen or so years after the death of Jesus, though they were not the converts of the “Apostle of the Gentiles” (Romans 15:20). Paul had not yet visited them at the time he wrote his great letter in 57-58 A.D..

There was a large Jewish population in Rome. Probably as a result of controversy between Jews and Jewish Christians, the Emperor Claudius expelled all Jews from Rome in 49-50 A.D. Suetonius the historian says that the expulsion was due to disturbances in the city “caused by the certain Chrestus” [Christ]. Perhaps many came back after Claudius’s death in 54 A.D. Paul’s letter was addressed to a Church with members from Jewish and Gentile backgrounds.

In July of 64 A.D., more than half of Rome was destroyed by fire. Rumor blamed the tragedy on Nero, who wanted to enlarge his palace. He shifted the blame by accusing the Christians. According to the historian Tacitus, many Christians were put to death because of their “hatred of the human race.” Peter and Paul were probably among the victims.

Threatened by an army revolt and condemned to death by the senate, Nero committed suicide in 68 A.D. at the age of 31.

Read the source: http://www.americancatholic.org/features/saints/saint.aspx?id=1430

Comment:

Wherever the Good News of Jesus was preached, it met the same opposition as Jesus did, and many of those who began to follow him shared his suffering and death. But no human force could stop the power of the Spirit unleashed upon the world. The blood of martyrs has always been, and will always be, the seed of Christians.

Quote:

Pope Clement I, third successor of St. Peter, writes: “It was through envy and jealousy that the greatest and most upright pillars of the Church were persecuted and struggled unto death…. First of all, Peter, who because of unreasonable jealousy suffered not merely once or twice but many times, and, having thus given his witness, went to the place of glory that he deserved. It was through jealousy and conflict that Paul showed the way to the prize for perseverance. He was put in chains seven times, sent into exile, and stoned; a herald both in the east and the west, he achieved a noble fame by his faith….”

“Around these men with their holy lives there are gathered a great throng of the elect, who, though victims of jealousy, gave us the finest example of endurance in the midst of many indignities and tortures. Through jealousy women were tormented, like Dirce or the daughters of Danaus, suffering terrible and unholy acts of violence. But they courageously finished the course of faith and despite their bodily weakness won a noble prize.”

Surrender to Sodomy: Supreme Court’s decision on the constitutionality of gay “marriage”

Surrender to Sodomy: Supreme Court’s decision on the constitutionality of gay “marriage” 

Below is our coverage of the Supreme Court’s decision on the constitutionality of gay “marriage.” Stay tuned to ChurchMilitant.com for the most up-to-date coverage of the injustice committed by the U.S. Supreme Court.

This is far from the end for Catholics. It is the dawn of a new era.

 

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: Time to Enlist

Bishop Round-Up: Best & Worst Statements Following Ruling

Culture Of Life 101 … ‘Is Homosexuality An Addiction?’

NY Church Drapes Altar Steps With Gay Flag

Gay Marriage: How Did We Get Here?

Same-Sex ‘Marriage': An International Revolution

MUST READ—U.S. Bishops Conference Condemns Ruling

Justice Scalia Rips Apart Gay ‘Marriage’ Ruling

Leading Archbishops Demand Protection Against Gay ‘Marriage’

Catholic Battle at Supreme Court

Christian-Owned Business Closing Due To Denial of Gay Wedding

Is the Course of Marriage in the U.S. Set to Change?

Related Articles/ Videos:

Breaking: Supreme Court Redefines Marriage Throughout USA

5 Implications of the US Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Decision

US Supreme Court Decision on Marriage “A Tragic Error” Says Archbishop Kurtz, President of USCCB

What does the legalization of gay marriage mean for the Catholic Church?

Redefining Marriage, Part 1-10: Who’s to blame? The root of the problem.

Catholic Respond to Brave New Roe: One Nation, Divided Over Marriage

11 Most Devastating Quotes from John Robert’s Gay Marriage Dissent

12 Quotes: “Marriage Equality” spells the death of marriage

Supreme Court Decision in Obergefell vs. Hodges on Homosexual Marriage as National Policy

 

Here-under are some articles about marriage for you to read or watch: 

  1. Getting to know you, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=284
  2. Be Positive, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=288
  3. Love and Marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=292
  4. Endless Love – Marriage after all, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=294
  5. Say it with love, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=298
  6. Quality family moments, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=300
  7. Secret of successful marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=302
  8. The vocation of marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1968
  9. Marriage as Covenant, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1974
  10. Humility: Foundation for Marital Happiness, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1986
  11. Gratitude: Foundation for marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1980
  12. True Meaning of marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1972
  13. Marriage and incompatibility, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2112
  14. Love is a garden, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2116
  15. Three kinds of love, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2095

“God himself is the author of marriage” (GS 48:1). The vocation of marriage is written in the very nature of man and woman as they came from the hand of the Creator. Marriage is not a purely human institution despite the many variations it may have undergone through the centuries in different cultures, social structures, and spiritual attitudes (CCC:1603)

FBI Homosexuality. Many believe the Freemasons are simply a centuries-old charitable fraternity. However, the Catholic Church has consistently condemned Freemasonry more than any other error in its history because it promotes indifferentism, naturalism, communism, and other dangerous philosophies.

Please click this link to watch the video on FBI Homosexuality by Michael Voris

Homosexuality, the Grave Evil Presented as Good, Part 1

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexuality: Grave Evil Presented as Good, Part 1

Homosexuality, Question and Answer Part 2

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexuality, Q & A

Homosexuals and Freemasons inside the Church

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexual and Freemasons inside the Church by Michael Voris

“The Rite of Sodomy” Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Please click this link to watch the video on “The Rite of Sodomy” Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Mic’d Up “Pink Money and the Homosexual Mafia” 

Please click this link to watch the video on Mic’d Up “Pink Money and the Homosexual Mafia”

Michael Voris gives a series of short talks, answering questions coming in response to his talk on homosexuality in Nigeria.

In this talk from Nigeria, Michael Voris speaks about the grave evil presented as good – homosexuality. “Homosexuality refers to relations between men or between women who experience an exclusive or predominant sexual attraction toward persons of the same sex. It has taken great variety of forms through the centuries and in different cultures. Its psychological genesis remains largely unexplained. Basing itself on Sacred Scripture, which presents homosexual acts as acts of grave depravity (cf. Gen 19:1-29; Rom 1:24-27; 1 Cor 6:10; 1 Tim 1:10), tradition has always declared that ‘homosexual acts are intinsically disordered” (CDF, Persona humana 8). They are contrary to the natural law. They close the sexual act to the gift of life. They do not proceed from a genuine affective and sexual complementarity. Under no circumstances can they be approved” (CCC: 2357).

Today’s Vortex—Catholic Betrayal

Today’s Vortex—Catholic Betrayal

Published on Jun 29, 2015

Catholics are the ones MOST in favor of gay marriage.
For more, visit http://www.ChurchMilitant.com and become a premium member!

TRANSCRIPT

I’m Michael Voris coming to you from the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., where last Friday, June 26, will be seen as the day America died.

The overwhelming issue, however, is in the face of such evil, where has the Catholic Church in America been? More to the point, where have Her leaders been? This evil did not just come about overnight. It has been working its way through the culture for decades now. And where have those leaders been? They have been busy not protecting the sheep, not keeping rampant homosexuality out of the seminaries, coddling and protecting actively gay men in their own ranks. Some of them turned out to be youth rapists, but that was not the majority. The majority have been sponsoring homosexual Masses, pretending that the issue was one in need of just compassion with no instruction.

Poll after poll shows that of all the religions in America, Catholics are the one most in favor of gay marriage — and that is because they have been led by a homosexual clergy for decades. Even the men who have been ordained who are not gay themselves have sat by quietly for the most part and said nothing as active homosexuals have run wild in parishes, chanceries, seminaries and universities. And some of these wicked men were advanced and promoted into the office of bishop — successors of the Apostles — and participated in these wicked horrible acts.

Make no mistake; the demise of America that became official last week has the fingerprints of multiple U.S. bishops and priests all over it.

While Matt Pearson and I were out in the madness in front of the Court, as the decision was being handed down, we saw the penultimate sign — Catholics for Equality — being held up by a guy who said to me, “Michael, we know you.”

He and I got into a brief exchange. He said, “I think you’re going to be very unhappy with today’s ruling.”

I said, “Not as unhappy as God.”

He retorted, “God loves this. He wants people to be happy and have equality.”

I said, “No, He wants people to go to Heaven.” At that I walked away.

Now, as far as either Matt Pearson or I could see, there wasn’t one person — not one person — there in the massive crowd in support of the truth. There may have been, but we never saw them. What we did notice was the conspicuous absence of any contingent from the archdiocese of Washington, D.C. Where was Cardinal Donald Wuerl’s presence here, defending the truth of Catholic orthodoxy? Where were his people — his staffers, etc.? The Human Rights Campaign had all their staffers out here with flags and banners and megaphones and cheers. Where was the Catholic presence?

The same place it’s been for decades: missing in action.

In fact, on the way back from the decision, we noticed that the Twitter account of the Archdiocese of Washington, D.C. — on the most critical day in Supreme Court memory — actually tweeted out this message: “Spend time in the great outdoors! Snap a photo and share the beauty of God’s creation. #cultivatingcreation”

Later in the day, the limp-wristed, effeminate Twitter response from Cdl. Donald Wuerl’s people to the evil that just engulfed the nation read: believing in the truth, we must not fail to proclaim it.”

When oh when will Almighty God send us real men to stand up and fight for the people of God?

This damage to the Church has come at the hands of effeminate, sissy men who for decades kept their own homosexuality or pro-homosexual views to themselves while wreaking havoc on the souls of the faithful. Catholics have been betrayed, lied to and trod underfoot by Catholic leaders who have been the impetus in pushing this country over the cliff. This is not only a victory for the forces of Hell, it is a double victory because it was made possible by Catholic traitors, many of them wearing robes.

Pray for their souls, fellow Catholics, however difficult from a human perspective this may be. Pray for them — because many, many of these men, priests and bishops and cardinals are facing the fires of Hell for all eternity if they do not repent now.

Related Articles/ Videos:

Breaking: Supreme Court Redefines Marriage Throughout USA

5 Implications of the US Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Decision

US Supreme Court Decision on Marriage “A Tragic Error” Says Archbishop Kurtz, President of USCCB

What does the legalization of gay marriage mean for the Catholic Church?

Redefining Marriage, Part 1-10: Who’s to blame? The root of the problem.

Catholic Respond to Brave New Roe: One Nation, Divided Over Marriage

11 Most Devastating Quotes from John Robert’s Gay Marriage Dissent

12 Quotes: “Marriage Equality” spells the death of marriage

Supreme Court Decision in Obergefell vs. Hodges on Homosexual Marriage as National Policy

Here-under are some articles about marriage for you to read or watch: 

  1. Getting to know you, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=284
  2. Be Positive, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=288
  3. Love and Marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=292
  4. Endless Love – Marriage after all, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=294
  5. Say it with love, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=298
  6. Quality family moments, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=300
  7. Secret of successful marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=302
  8. The vocation of marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1968
  9. Marriage as Covenant, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1974
  10. Humility: Foundation for Marital Happiness, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1986
  11. Gratitude: Foundation for marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1980
  12. True Meaning of marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1972
  13. Marriage and incompatibility, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2112
  14. Love is a garden, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2116
  15. Three kinds of love, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2095

“God himself is the author of marriage” (GS 48:1). The vocation of marriage is written in the very nature of man and woman as they came from the hand of the Creator. Marriage is not a purely human institution despite the many variations it may have undergone through the centuries in different cultures, social structures, and spiritual attitudes (CCC:1603)

FBI Homosexuality. Many believe the Freemasons are simply a centuries-old charitable fraternity. However, the Catholic Church has consistently condemned Freemasonry more than any other error in its history because it promotes indifferentism, naturalism, communism, and other dangerous philosophies.

Please click this link to watch the video on FBI Homosexuality by Michael Voris

Homosexuality, the Grave Evil Presented as Good, Part 1

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexuality: Grave Evil Presented as Good, Part 1

Homosexuality, Question and Answer Part 2

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexuality, Q & A

Homosexuals and Freemasons inside the Church

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexual and Freemasons inside the Church by Michael Voris

“The Rite of Sodomy” Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Please click this link to watch the video on “The Rite of Sodomy” Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Mic’d Up “Pink Money and the Homosexual Mafia” 

Please click this link to watch the video on Mic’d Up “Pink Money and the Homosexual Mafia”

Michael Voris gives a series of short talks, answering questions coming in response to his talk on homosexuality in Nigeria.

In this talk from Nigeria, Michael Voris speaks about the grave evil presented as good – homosexuality. “Homosexuality refers to relations between men or between women who experience an exclusive or predominant sexual attraction toward persons of the same sex. It has taken great variety of forms through the centuries and in different cultures. Its psychological genesis remains largely unexplained. Basing itself on Sacred Scripture, which presents homosexual acts as acts of grave depravity (cf. Gen 19:1-29; Rom 1:24-27; 1 Cor 6:10; 1 Tim 1:10), tradition has always declared that ‘homosexual acts are intinsically disordered” (CDF, Persona humana 8). They are contrary to the natural law. They close the sexual act to the gift of life. They do not proceed from a genuine affective and sexual complementarity. Under no circumstances can they be approved” (CCC: 2357).

The #1 Reason the Catholic Church Won’t Support Same-Sex Marriage…

The #1 Reason the Catholic Church Won’t Support Same-Sex Marriage…

St. John The Baptist In The Wilderness, by José Leonardo (Spain, 1601-before 1653) LACMA Collection, Public Domain

You won’t see the reason being raised by the dissenting justices of SCOTUS. You won’t see the reason being discussed in philosophy papers, or papers expanded into book length dissertations on marriage, where all manner of other good reasons to protect and defend traditional marriage are enumerated, and bolstered with reasonable arguments.

The real reason is simple, and it’s not based on bigotry. It’s based 100% on love. The kind of love that only a mother has for her children.

But the reason isn’t popular, see,  and I daresay you rarely, if ever, hear articulate, solid, well mannered, and well versed, New Evangelizers sharing this particular reason with folks they come into contact with.

So what’s absolutely, positively, the A-1, best reason why the Bride of Christ won’t recognize Same-Sex marriage as being a good?

Because Hell burns, and for all eternity. That’s why. The Church teaches that unrepentantly engaging in homosexual acts will lead one to eternal damnation. The Catholic Church teaches Truth,see, as her founder, who is all perfect Love, proclaims.

Of course, the Church (as the foundation of truth) also teaches that committing all manner of other sinful acts, without compunction or repentance, leads one right to Hell too. Not much has changed in this regard since John the Baptist went around telling folks to “Repent!

And the Church, that holy hospital built by Christ Himself to cleanse us, and lead us to the Promised Land, wouldn’t be doing her job properly for her Lord if she didn’t use every ounce of the Magisterial Authority she wields to do everything in her power to prevent souls from being destroyed for all eternity.

You want philosophical/existential answers? Remember what St. Thomas Aquinas said in his Lenten homilies delivered in the final year of his life,

Man needs to know two things: the glory of God and the punishment of Hell. For through being drawn by His glory and terrified by His punishments, men are careful on their own account and refrain from sin.

Easy as that sounds, the Angelic Doctor goes on to remind us,

It is also difficult to know about the punishments of Hell, for “no man hath been known to have returned from Hell,” which is said in the person of the wicked. But it cannot be said now, since just as He came down from Heaven in order to teach us heavenly things, so did He come back from Hell in order to teach us about Hell.

And as inconvenient to the zeitgeist (yesterday, today, and tomorrow) this truth may be, nothing is going to change the Churchs’ viewpoint on this. And I don’t just mean the prelates who are running the Vatican. I mean folks in the pews like me. Folks who have heard the words of Jesus, the Father’s ambassador, and who believe them. Folks who believe Jesus told the truth when he said of the apostles,

“Whoever listens to you listens to me. Whoever rejects you rejects me. And whoever rejects me rejects the one who sent me.”

I joined the Church in order to be saved from the wide road leading straight to the Devils’ playground. I didn’t become Catholic in order to find a comfortable spot where I could get a free pass on all my sinful behaviors, while never having to change. If that was the case, I came to the wrong place, as Cardinal John Henry Newman reminds me.

The Catholic Church holds it better for the sun and moon to drop from heaven, for the earth to fail, and for all the many millions on it to die of starvation in extremest agony, as far as temporal affliction goes, than that one soul, I will not say, should be lost, but should commit one single venial sin, should tell one wilful untruth, or should steal one poor farthing without excuse. —Blessed Cardinal John Henry Newman, Apologia Pro Vita Sua

If the Church’s mission is to save as many souls as possible, make saints out of folks, and bring as many of us to Heaven as she can, then it’s obvious that she isn’t going to condone, or support, behaviors that will guaranteethat souls are eternally put to death.  Capice?

That would make absolutely no sense. It would be like your mother telling you to go outside and play on the highway, or get you drunk, and then hand you the car keys with a peck on the check and a “go have fun” whispered in your ear.

It would be like giving folks, who have an equal chance for salvation (or not), and instead giving them a greater than equal chance for damnation. That isn’t the kind of calculus you want your soul saving physician to be making, is it? Blaise Pascal would point out that this is like playing with loaded dice that never roll in your favor.

That’s kind of how opinion rolls in the the world, though, what with phony-baloney teachings, and you scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours gamesmanship, etc. But that isn’t what the Church is all about.

By the way, this is the same reason (Hell is Hot!) why the Church doesn’t teach that murder is okey-dokey, or stealing, or abortion, or wars of conquest, rape, etc., etc., either. Nor does she condone any number of other acts that the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob has held as dangerous to our souls since the prophets started rebuking the children of Israel, up to when the Apostles were spreading the Good News, way back when the New Exodus was just getting off the ground.

So for folks to kid themselves that the Church would ever “get with the times, ” or up and decide to get on “the right side of history,” they are completely missing the fact that His Story is the one she has been called to share the world over, in a bid to save our very lives.

Thankfully, the Church has the power to take our sins, no matter how heinous they are, or how deep their crimson color, and make them whiter than snow. You supply the repentance and the contrition, and she provides the balm that heals. But the clean and folded laundry comes with a bill attached from Christ Himself that reads, “be perfect as your heavenly father is perfect.”

Gulp.

If sinning is another way of saying “missing the mark,” then thinking that the Church is going to be hunky dory with folks shooting Maggie’s drawers, and missing the broad side of barns over and over again, never once really trying to become more Christ-like, well…that is a pretty ridiculous notion.

It’s as ridiculous as arguing that same-sex unions are bad for society, while keeping mum on the fact that they are damning for the soul. Pope Francis knows better. And if you want to better understand the rational reasons why the Catholic Church proclaims same-sex marriage as an error, you have to understand the reasons why the Father sent his son to be our savior.

“About Jesus Christ and the Church, I simply know they are just one thing and we shouldn’t complicate the matter.” —St. Joan of Arc

Amen.

Read the source:  http://www.patheos.com/blogs/yimcatholic/2015/06/the-1-reason-the-catholic-church-wont-support-same-sex-marriage.html

Related

The Vatican: Considerations on Homosexual Unions.

Monsignor Charles Pope: What does the Catholic Church offer to the Homosexual Person?

The Compendium: Love and the formation of a community of persons.

Monsignor Charles Pope: Supreme Mistake-A Response to the Supreme Court Decisions on Same-Sex Unions.

Breaking: Supreme Court Redefines Marriage Throughout USA

5 Implications of the US Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Decision

US Supreme Court Decision on Marriage “A Tragic Error” Says Archbishop Kurtz, President of USCCB

What does the legalization of gay marriage mean for the Catholic Church?

Redefining Marriage, Part 1-10: Who’s to blame? The root of the problem.

Catholic Respond to Brave New Roe: One Nation, Divided Over Marriage

11 Most Devastating Quotes from John Robert’s Gay Marriage Dissent

12 Quotes: “Marriage Equality” spells the death of marriage

Supreme Court Decision in Obergefell vs. Hodges on Homosexual Marriage as National Policy

Here-under are some articles about marriage for you to read or watch: 

  1. Getting to know you, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=284
  2. Be Positive, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=288
  3. Love and Marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=292
  4. Endless Love – Marriage after all, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=294
  5. Say it with love, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=298
  6. Quality family moments, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=300
  7. Secret of successful marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=302
  8. The vocation of marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1968
  9. Marriage as Covenant, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1974
  10. Humility: Foundation for Marital Happiness, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1986
  11. Gratitude: Foundation for marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1980
  12. True Meaning of marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1972
  13. Marriage and incompatibility, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2112
  14. Love is a garden, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2116
  15. Three kinds of love, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2095

“God himself is the author of marriage” (GS 48:1). The vocation of marriage is written in the very nature of man and woman as they came from the hand of the Creator. Marriage is not a purely human institution despite the many variations it may have undergone through the centuries in different cultures, social structures, and spiritual attitudes (CCC:1603)

FBI Homosexuality. Many believe the Freemasons are simply a centuries-old charitable fraternity. However, the Catholic Church has consistently condemned Freemasonry more than any other error in its history because it promotes indifferentism, naturalism, communism, and other dangerous philosophies.

Please click this link to watch the video on FBI Homosexuality by Michael Voris

Homosexuality, the Grave Evil Presented as Good, Part 1

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexuality: Grave Evil Presented as Good, Part 1

Homosexuality, Question and Answer Part 2

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexuality, Q & A

Homosexuals and Freemasons inside the Church

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexual and Freemasons inside the Church by Michael Voris

“The Rite of Sodomy” Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Please click this link to watch the video on “The Rite of Sodomy” Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Mic’d Up “Pink Money and the Homosexual Mafia” 

Please click this link to watch the video on Mic’d Up “Pink Money and the Homosexual Mafia”

Michael Voris gives a series of short talks, answering questions coming in response to his talk on homosexuality in Nigeria.

In this talk from Nigeria, Michael Voris speaks about the grave evil presented as good – homosexuality. “Homosexuality refers to relations between men or between women who experience an exclusive or predominant sexual attraction toward persons of the same sex. It has taken great variety of forms through the centuries and in different cultures. Its psychological genesis remains largely unexplained. Basing itself on Sacred Scripture, which presents homosexual acts as acts of grave depravity (cf. Gen 19:1-29; Rom 1:24-27; 1 Cor 6:10; 1 Tim 1:10), tradition has always declared that ‘homosexual acts are intinsically disordered” (CDF, Persona humana 8). They are contrary to the natural law. They close the sexual act to the gift of life. They do not proceed from a genuine affective and sexual complementarity. Under no circumstances can they be approved” (CCC: 2357).

Taking Back Marriage

Taking Back Marriage

The Village Wedding

BY SCOTT P. RICHERT JUNE 29,2015

The only thing surprising about the U.S. Supreme Court’s 5–4 decision requiring all 50 states and the District of Columbia to perform gay “marriages,” and to recognize such unions contracted in other states, is that it took so long. The writing was on the wall 11 years ago, when the Republicans controlled both houses of Congress and the George W. Bush administration refused to get behind a bill in the House of Representatives that would have removed cases challenging state marriage laws from consideration by the federal courts. There was an election to win in 2004, and the threat of gay “marriage” (like the continual promise to curtail abortion) was a great way to turn out social conservatives to vote for Republican candidates. By the time President Bush was reelected, the first cases to force states to recognize gay “marriages” contracted in other states had been filed in federal court. As I predicted in the January 2005 issue of Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture, short-term political gain has led to long-term cultural pain.

Fast-forward nine years, and we were discussing on this very website an earlier 5–4 decision (United States v. Windsor) on gay “marriage.” Also written by Justice Anthony Kennedy, a Reagan appointee and a putative Catholic, that decision gutted the Defense of Marriage Act and paved the legal way to the outcome in Obergefell v. Hodges, released on June 26—just in time for the “gay pride” celebrations held around the country on June 28.

In my article for Crisis in 2013, I proposed a way forward for defenders of marriage that many commenters thought too radical. (When I had proposed it earlier in bothChronicles and on the Catholicism site for About.com, a significant number of readers had reacted the same way.) The Catholic Church in the United States, I argued, should divorce (no pun intended) marriage within the Church entirely from what the state deems to be marriage.

The chief opposition to my proposal arose from the fact that, at the time, many still clung to the hope that a political solution was possible. After all, only three states—Maine, Maryland, and Washington—had legalized gay “marriage” through popular vote; all the rest of the states where gay “marriage” was legal had had it imposed by state or federal courts.

As I warned back then, that optimism has proved misguided. There are no political solutions to cultural problems, and at its heart, the attempted redefinition of marriage is a cultural problem. Restore the culture, and politics will follow. And no institution in the world is better positioned to restore the culture than the Catholic Church.

In the wake of the latest decision, more people are independently arriving at a version of my proposal, but I am also seeing, particularly among Catholics, calls for digging in for a long political fight, with explicit comparisons to the pro-life movement that developed in the wake of Roe v. Wade.

Yet, 42 years on, the pro-life movement is a near-perfect example of why attempting to find cultural solutions to cultural problems is more effective in the long run than trying to find political ones. At the national level, abortion plays a role in virtually every election, but even when the presumed party of life controls both houses of Congress and the presidency (as the Republicans did from 2001 through 2005), no real effort is made to advance the pro-life cause. Indeed, the opposite is too often true; in his first term, George W. Bush approved by executive order federal funding for embryonic stem-cell research, something that the pro-abortion Democrat Bill Clinton hadn’t done.

Meanwhile, at the local level, hundreds of abortuaries have been prayed out of business, and hundreds of thousands of babies have been saved through the efforts of vast networks of crisis-pregnancy centers, which make a real difference in the lives of the mothers and fathers of those children by welcoming them into the culture of life.

A more significant objection to my proposal was the fear that it would mean that the Church would not be living up to her mission to preach the truth to all men. Sacramental marriage—the union of two baptized Christians—is not the only type of marriage with which the Church must be concerned. As the chief exponent of natural law, she has a witness to bear regarding natural marriage as well—and that truth cannot be confined only to baptized Catholics. When I proposed that the Church no longer require those who wish to be married within the Church to seek a marriage license from the state, it appeared to some (admittedly, not unreasonably) that I was ceding natural marriage to the state.

What I had in mind, however, was the separation of both sacramental marriage and natural marriage from what President Obama calls “civil marriage”—that is, those state-licensed unions whose definition depends neither on natural law nor on history and tradition but on Justice Kennedy’s specious reasoning. The Church could and should continue to teach about natural marriage as well as sacramental marriage, and perhaps she might even consider expanding her practice of performing purely natural marriages beyond the limited case where a baptized Catholic wishes to marry a non-Christian. A pragmatic willingness to perform natural marriages for those who cannot be sacramentally married in the Church but who want no part of “civil marriage,” as defined by Justice Kennedy and President Obama, would itself be a potentially productive tool for evangelization, just as the Church’s consistent pro-life witness has led to many conversions since Roe v. Wade.

For the Christian, of course, evangelization is the ultimate solution to cultural problems. And evangelization is not the calling simply of popes and bishops, priests and deacons, but of all Christians. Each of us needs to gain a better understanding of the Church’s teaching on both natural and sacramental marriage, so that we can explain it to others, within the context of natural law and the Gospel. Given the abysmal state of catechesis within the Church for several decades now, the hierarchy will need to lead the way, and that will require our bishops and priests to quit worrying so much about the possibility of causing “offense” (which in secular terms means simply “saying something that someone else doesn’t want to hear”) and start worrying more about philosophical and theological clarity. But parents need to play their God-given role as well. The sheer number of practicing Catholics of my generation (I am 47) and younger who have embraced the attempted redefinition of marriage bears witness not only to the failure of our shepherds to teach their flocks well but of mothers and fathers both to teach the truth about marriage and to live it in their own lives. The embrace of contraception and pornography, the easy recourse to divorce, and the pursuit of wealth and “self-fulfillment” at the expense of spouse and children all speak louder than any platitudes parents may utter about the necessity and beauty of marriage.

Obergefell v. Hodges was not the end of the assault on marriage; it is much closer to the beginning. Every argument that Justice Kennedy made for gay “marriage” applies equally to polygamous relationships and even to incestuous ones. (This is not hyperbole or paranoia; read his opinion, and try to find a single argument that does not apply.) In the wake of the decision, numerous proponents of gay “marriage” have simultaneously claimed that churches will never be required to perform gay “marriages” and argued that there’s no reason why they shouldn’t perform them; that in itself is evidence that those who, like the Catholic Church, refuse to do so will find themselves sooner rather than later tarred with the brush of hate, and perhaps only shortly after that actively persecuted for defending the truth.

While it seems on the surface that those who have fought for “marriage equality” have done so primarily at the ballot box and through the courts, the reality is that they triumphed on June 26 because for decades they have been reshaping the culture. We defenders of marriage have been the ones who have largely confined our efforts to the political arena, but it’s not too late to make up for our mistake. We have two tools at hand that the other side does not: truth and grace. It’s time to begin acting like we believe in both.

Editor’s note: The image above titled “The Village Wedding” was painted by Sir Samuel Luke Fildes.

Scott P. Richert

By

Scott P. Richert is the executive editor of Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture, and writes the Guide to Catholicism for About.com.

Related Articles/ Videos:

Breaking: Supreme Court Redefines Marriage Throughout USA

5 Implications of the US Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Decision

US Supreme Court Decision on Marriage “A Tragic Error” Says Archbishop Kurtz, President of USCCB

What does the legalization of gay marriage mean for the Catholic Church?

Redefining Marriage, Part 1-10: Who’s to blame? The root of the problem.

Catholic Respond to Brave New Roe: One Nation, Divided Over Marriage

11 Most Devastating Quotes from John Robert’s Gay Marriage Dissent

12 Quotes: “Marriage Equality” spells the death of marriage

Supreme Court Decision in Obergefell vs. Hodges on Homosexual Marriage as National Policy

Here-under are some articles about marriage for you to read or watch: 

  1. Getting to know you, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=284
  2. Be Positive, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=288
  3. Love and Marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=292
  4. Endless Love – Marriage after all, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=294
  5. Say it with love, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=298
  6. Quality family moments, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=300
  7. Secret of successful marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=302
  8. The vocation of marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1968
  9. Marriage as Covenant, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1974
  10. Humility: Foundation for Marital Happiness, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1986
  11. Gratitude: Foundation for marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1980
  12. True Meaning of marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1972
  13. Marriage and incompatibility, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2112
  14. Love is a garden, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2116
  15. Three kinds of love, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2095

“God himself is the author of marriage” (GS 48:1). The vocation of marriage is written in the very nature of man and woman as they came from the hand of the Creator. Marriage is not a purely human institution despite the many variations it may have undergone through the centuries in different cultures, social structures, and spiritual attitudes (CCC:1603)

FBI Homosexuality. Many believe the Freemasons are simply a centuries-old charitable fraternity. However, the Catholic Church has consistently condemned Freemasonry more than any other error in its history because it promotes indifferentism, naturalism, communism, and other dangerous philosophies.

Please click this link to watch the video on FBI Homosexuality by Michael Voris

Homosexuality, the Grave Evil Presented as Good, Part 1

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexuality: Grave Evil Presented as Good, Part 1

Homosexuality, Question and Answer Part 2

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexuality, Q & A

Homosexuals and Freemasons inside the Church

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexual and Freemasons inside the Church by Michael Voris

“The Rite of Sodomy” Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Please click this link to watch the video on “The Rite of Sodomy” Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Mic’d Up “Pink Money and the Homosexual Mafia” 

Please click this link to watch the video on Mic’d Up “Pink Money and the Homosexual Mafia”

Michael Voris gives a series of short talks, answering questions coming in response to his talk on homosexuality in Nigeria.

In this talk from Nigeria, Michael Voris speaks about the grave evil presented as good – homosexuality. “Homosexuality refers to relations between men or between women who experience an exclusive or predominant sexual attraction toward persons of the same sex. It has taken great variety of forms through the centuries and in different cultures. Its psychological genesis remains largely unexplained. Basing itself on Sacred Scripture, which presents homosexual acts as acts of grave depravity (cf. Gen 19:1-29; Rom 1:24-27; 1 Cor 6:10; 1 Tim 1:10), tradition has always declared that ‘homosexual acts are intinsically disordered” (CDF, Persona humana 8). They are contrary to the natural law. They close the sexual act to the gift of life. They do not proceed from a genuine affective and sexual complementarity. Under no circumstances can they be approved” (CCC: 2357).

Pope Francis on Weapons: 12 things to know and share

Pope Francis on Weapons: 12 things to know and share

Did Pope Francis recently condemn all weapons and weapons manufacturing? Here are 12 things to know and share . . .

06/27/2015 

Recently Pope Francis made some impromptu remarks about weapons manufacturers at a meeting with young people in Turin.

These were poorly misreported in the press and have resulted in a number of questions being asked.

First we will take a look at what he said and then look at some of the questions that have been asked.

Here are 12 things to know and share . . .

 

1) Where can I read the pope’s remarks in their entirety?

The Italian original is here.

At present, there is no official English translation, but Fr. Stephanos Pedrano, O.S.B. of Prince of Peace Abbey kindly provided me with an unofficial one of the part of his remarks dealing with weapons manufacturers.

You can read it here.

2) What did Pope Francis say?

In the relevant section of his remarks, Pope Francis begins by interacting with previous remarks made by a young woman named Sara.

He appears to be quoting or paraphrasing things Sara said, as indicated by quotation marks in the Italian original.

Here is the beginning of the remarks, with the apparent quotations from Sara in red:

And thank-you, Sara, a lover of theater.  Thank-you.

“I think of the words of Jesus:  to give one’s life.”

We just spoke of this.

“We often feel a sense of distrust in life.”

Yes, because there are situations that make us think:

“But, is it worth the trouble to live life this way?  What can I expect to get from this life?”

At this point, Pope Francis begins to reflect on the subject of wars.

3) What does he say about wars?

Initially, he says:

We think, in this world, about wars.

At times I have said that we are living through the third world war, but by pieces.  Pieces:  in Europe there’s war, in Africa there’s war, in the Middle East there’s war, in other countries there’s war.

But can I put my trust in a life like that?  Can I trust world leaders?  I, when I go to vote for a candidate, can I trust that he won’t take my country to war?

If you trust only in men, you are lost!

At this point, Pope Francis makes his remarks concerning weapons manufacturing.

4) What does he say about weapons manufacturing?

In this section, Pope Francis interacts with an imaginary interlocutor who has investments in munitions, as indicated by quotation marks in the Italian original. He says:

This makes me think of something:  people, leaders, businessmen who say they are Christians, and they manufacture weapons!  This brings up some distrust:  they say they are Christians!

“No, no, Father, I don’t manufacture, no, no….  I only have my savings, my investments in the weapons factories.”

Ah!  And why?

“Because the interest rates are a little higher….”

And even being two-faced is hard cash, today:  to say one thing and to make of it something else.  Hypocrisy….

Having introduced the theme of hypocrisy in connection with war, Pope Francis then looks at three historical incidents in which political powers failed to intervene in the face of aggression taking place in the world.

5) What are the three incidents?

The first example is that of the Armenian genocide. He says:

But let’s take a look at what happened in the last century:  in 1914, 1915, in 1915 exactly.  There was that great tragedy of Armenia.  So many died.  I don’t know the number:  more than a million certainly.

But where were the great powers of the day?  They were watching from elsewhere.

Why?  Because they were interested in the war:  their war!

And those who die, they’re second-class persons, human beings.

The second example is that of the German Holocaust during World War II:

Then, in the thirties and forties, the tragedy of the Shoah [Holocaust].

The great powers had the photographs of the railway lines that bore the trains to the concentrations camps, like Auschwitz, to kill Jews, and also Christians, also Gypsies, also homosexuals, to kill them in that place.

But tell me, why didn’t they bomb it?  Interest!

The third example is that of Stalinist Russia:

And a little later, almost at the same time, there were the prison camps in Russia:  Stalin….  How many Christians suffered, were killed!

The great powers divided Europe among themselves like a pie.  So many years had to pass before arriving at a kind of “freedom.”

Pope Francis then makes a concluding remark on hypocrisy and weapons manufacturing.

6) What is his concluding remark?

He says:

There is that hypocrisy of speaking of peace and manufacturing weapons, and then even of selling the weapons to this one who’s at war with that one, and to that one who’s at war with this one!

After this, Pope Francis goes on to discuss matters other than war and weapons manufacturing.

 

7) How would you summarize Pope Francis’s remarks thus far?

The general sense of the pope’s remarks seems to be as follows:

In response to a young woman’s question about what we can expect from life, Pope Francis indicates that there are problems in the world and that we cannot simply put our trust in political leaders. They will let us down.

They may take our countries into war, even when they have said they will not. In fact, there are many wars taking place in the world today.

They may also look the other way in conflicts, for reasons of their own self-interest. This is shown by multiple examples from recent history where world powers self-interestedly looked the other way and failed to take action to stop immense oppression and murder.

Politicians may speak of peace, but they are often hypocritical in these ways. The same hypocrisy can manifest among people who—for reasons of financial gain—invest in weapons manufacturing without any concern about how those weapons will be used, as when they invest in arms makers who sell weapons to both sides in a conflict.

8) Did Pope Francis say that Christians can’t own a gun, such as for personal defense or for hunting?

He said nothing like this. Not even close.

His remarks are connected with war and the arms trade.

9) Did Pope Francis say that the use or manufacture of weapons is always wrong?

No, he didn’t say this, either.

In fact, he implied otherwise when he indicated that the Allies should have bombed the train lines to the Nazi concentration camps where the Holocaust was carried out.

Further, the Catechism of the Catholic Church acknowledges the just war doctrine, according to which warfare is legitimate in some circumstances.

As to weapons manufacturing, if weapons have legitimate uses, they have to come from somewhere.

If Pope Francis wanted the Allies to bomb Nazi-controlled train lines, he certainly expected them to get the bombs from somewhere, and in a world where people are willing to commit atrocities like the three he named, he would recognize the need the arms needed to resist such aggression.

10) Why didn’t Pope Francis say all that?

Presumably, for several reasons:

a) He was speaking impromptu.

b) The legitimate use of force could be inferred from his comments, as above.

c) He would expect his remarks to be understood in light of the established teaching of the Church. As he himself has said, “I am a son of the Church.”

d) Pope Francis has, on prior occasions, been open to use of force to stop “unjust aggression”, though he has cautioned against this becoming an excuse for unnecessary destruction or conquest.

e) He expects his remarks to be taken with what Benedict XVI referred to as “that initial goodwill without which there can be no understanding:” (Jesus of Nazareth, vol. 1, “Foreword”).

There is no credible reading of Pope Francis’s remarks that would make them an absolute prohibition on the use or manufacture of weapons.

11) What was he criticizing, then, in reference to people investing in munitions?

The hypocritical attitude of pretending to be for peace but by one’s actions displaying an indifference to the illegitimate use of weapons and warfare.

This is what unites both politicians who turn a blind eye to aggression and people who distance themselves from the manufacture of weapons (“No, no, Father, I don’t manufacture”) even though they invest in this for personal profit (“Because the interest rates are a little higher”) without concern for the moral dimension of arms sales, such as when a manufacturer amorally sells to both sides of a conflict (“then even of selling the weapons to this one who’s at war with that one, and to that one who’s at war with this one”).

This in no way means that the design and manufacture of arms cannot be legitimate—as it would be in the case of supplying the Allies bombs to use against Nazi-controlled rail lines or to oppose other forms of unjust aggression.

12) Did Pope Francis say that people act hypocritically in this way aren’t Christians?

No. Pope Francis knows that a baptized person who professes the Christian faith is a Christian, even if he behaves immorally.

The pope did not say that such people aren’t Christians. He remarked ironically, “They say they are Christians!”

This is a way of indicating a course of conduct that is inconsistent with Christian faith or morals. It doesn’t mean that a person isn’t a Christian, but that he is acting in a way that he shouldn’t act as a Christian.

One could make the same ironic remark about any Christian who is doing things he shouldn’t.

Read the source:  http://www.ncregister.com/blog/jimmy-akin/pope-francis-on-weapons-12-things-to-know-and-share

What Now?

If you like the information I’ve presented here, you should join my Secret Information Club.

If you’re not familiar with it, the Secret Information Club is a free service that I operate by email.

I send out information on a variety of fascinating topics connected with the Catholic faith.

In fact, the very first thing you’ll get if you sign up is information about what Pope Benedict said about the book of Revelation.

He had a lot of interesting things to say!

12 Quotes Against Sodomy That Every Catholic Should Know

12 Quotes Against Sodomy That Every Catholic Should Know

By TFP Student Action
December 14, 2013

For millennia the Catholic Church has consistently opposed unnatural vice. Here is a brief sampling of useful quotes from Saints, Doctors of the Church, Church Fathers and Ecclesiastical Writers who condemn homosexual vice in their writings.

Please share this post with all your Catholic friends.

1. Athenagoras of Athens (2nd Century)

Athenagoras of Athens was a philosopher who converted to Christianity in the second century. He shows that the pagans, who were totally immoral, did not even refrain from sins against nature:

“But though such is our character (Oh! why should I speak of things unfit to be uttered?), the things said of us are an example of the proverb, ‘The harlot reproves the chaste.’ For those who have set up a market for fornication and established infamous resorts for the young for every kind of vile pleasure – who do not abstain even from males, males with males committing shocking abominations, outraging all the noblest and comeliest bodies in all sorts of ways, so dishonoring the fair workmanship of God.”1

2. Tertullian (160-225)

Tertullian was a great genius and apologist of the early Church. Unfortunately, after an initial period of fervor, he succumbed to resentment and pride, left the Church and adhered to the Montanist heresy. Because of works written while still in the Church, he is considered an Ecclesiastical Writer and, as such, is commonly quoted by Popes and theologians.  His treatise On Modesty is an apology of Christian chastity. He clearly shows the horror the Church has for sins against nature. After condemning adultery, he exclaims:

“But all the other frenzies of passions–impious both toward the bodies and toward the sexes–beyond the laws of nature, we banish not only from the threshold, but from all shelter of the Church, because they are not sins, but monstrosities.”2

3. Eusebius of Caesarea (260-341)

Eusebius Pamphili, Bishop of Cæsarea in Palestine and the “Father of Church History,” writes in his book, Demonstratio Evangelica:

“[God in the Law given to Moses] having forbidden all unlawful marriage, and all unseemly practice, and the union of women with women and men with men.”3

4. Saint Jerome (340-420)

Saint Jerome is both Father and Doctor of the Church. He was also a notable exegete and great polemicist. In his book Against Jovinianus, he explains how a sodomite needs repentance and penance to be saved:

“And Sodom and Gomorrah might have appeased it [God’s wrath], had they been willing to repent, and through the aid of fasting gain for themselves tears of repentance.”4

5. Saint John Chrysostom (347-407)

Saint John Chrysostom is considered the greatest of the Greek Fathers and was proclaimed Doctor of the Church. He was Archbishop and Patriarch of Constantinople, and his revision of the Greek liturgy is used until today. In his sermons about Saint Paul’s Epistle to the Romans, he dwells on the gravity of the sin of homosexuality:

“But if thou scoffest at hearing of hell and believest not that fire, remember Sodom. For we have seen, surely we have seen, even in this present life, a semblance of hell. For since many would utterly disbelieve the things to come after the resurrection, hearing now of an unquenchable fire, God brings them to a right mind by things present. For such is the burning of Sodom, and that conflagration!…

“Consider how great is that sin, to have forced hell to appear even before its time!… For that rain was unwonted, for the intercourse was contrary to nature, and it deluged the land, since lust had done so with their souls. Wherefore also the rain was the opposite of the customary rain. Now not only did it fail to stir up the womb of the earth to the production of fruits, but made it even useless for the reception of seed. For such was also the intercourse of the men, making a body of this sort more worthless than the very land of Sodom. And what is there more detestable than a man who hath pandered himself, or what more execrable?5

6. Saint Augustine (354-430)

The greatest of the Fathers of the West and one of the great Doctors of the Church, Saint Augustine laid the foundations of Catholic theology. In his celebrated Confessions, he thus condemns homosexuality:

“Those offences which be contrary to nature are everywhere and at all times to be held in detestation and punished; such were those of the Sodomites, which should all nations commit, they should all be held guilty of the same crime by the divine law, which hath not so made men that they should in that way abuse one another. For even that fellowship which should be between God and us is violated, when that same nature of which He is author is polluted by the perversity of lust.”6

7. Saint Gregory the Great (540-604)

Pope Saint Gregory I is called “the Great.” He is both Father and Doctor of the Church. He introduced Gregorian chant into the Church. He organized England’s conversion, sending Saint Augustine of Canterbury and many Benedictine monks there.

“Sacred Scripture itself confirms that sulfur evokes the stench of the flesh, as it speaks of the rain of fire and sulfur poured upon Sodom by the Lord. He had decided to punish Sodom for the crimes of the flesh, and the very type of punishment he chose emphasized the shame of that crime. For sulfur stinks, and fire burns. So it was just that Sodomites, burning with perverse desires arising from the flesh like stench, should perish by fire and sulfur so that through this just punishment they would realize the evil they had committed, led by a perverse desire.”7

8. Saint Peter Damian (1007-1072)

Doctor of the Church, cardinal and a great reformer of the clergy, Saint Peter Damian wrote his famous Book of Gomorrah against the inroads made by homosexuality among the clergy. He describes not only the iniquity of homosexuality, but also its psychological and moral consequences:

“Truly, this vice is never to be compared with any other vice because it surpasses the enormity of all vices.… It defiles everything, stains everything, pollutes everything. And as for itself, it permits nothing pure, nothing clean, nothing other than filth.…

“The miserable flesh burns with the heat of lust; the cold mind trembles with the rancor of suspicion; and in the heart of the miserable man chaos boils like Tartarus [Hell]…. In fact, after this most poisonous serpent once sinks its fangs into the unhappy soul, sense is snatched away, memory is borne off, the sharpness of the mind is obscured. It becomes unmindful of God and even forgetful of itself. This plague undermines the foundation of faith, weakens the strength of hope, destroys the bond of charity; it takes away justice, subverts fortitude, banishes temperance, blunts the keenness of prudence.

“And what more should I say since it expels the whole host of the virtues from the chamber of the human heart and introduces every barbarous vice as if the bolts of the doors were pulled out.”8

9.  Saint Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274)

Commenting upon Saint Paul’s Epistle to the Romans (1:26-27), Saint Thomas Aquinas, the Angelic Doctor, explains why the sin of homosexuality is so grave:

“Given the sin of impiety through which they [the Romans] sinned against the divine nature [by idolatry], the punishment that led them to sin against their own nature followed…. I say, therefore, that since they changed into lies [by idolatry] the truth about God, He brought them to ignominious passions, that is, to sins against nature; not that God led them to evil, but only that he abandoned them to evil….

“If all the sins of the flesh are worthy of condemnation because by them man allows himself to be dominated by that which he has of the animal nature, much more deserving of condemnation are the sins against nature by which man degrades his own animal nature….

“Man can sin against nature in two ways. First, when he sins against his specific rational nature, acting contrary to reason. In this sense, we can say that every sin is a sin against man’s nature, because it is against man’s right reason….

“Secondly, man sins against nature when he goes against his generic nature, that is to say, his animal nature. Now, it is evident that, in accord with natural order, the union of the sexes among animals is ordered towards conception. From this it follows that every sexual intercourse that cannot lead to conception is opposed to man’s animal nature.”9

10.  Saint Catherine of Siena (1347-1380)

Saint Catherine, a great mystic and Doctor of the Church, lived in troubled times. The Papacy was in exile at Avignon, France. She was instrumental in bringing the Popes back to Rome. Her famous Dialogues are written as if dictated by God Himself:

“But they act in a contrary way, for they come full of impurity to this mystery, and not only of that impurity to which, through the fragility of your weak nature, you are all naturally inclined (although reason, when free will permits, can quiet the rebellion of nature), but these wretches not only do not bridle this fragility, but do worse, committing that accursed sin against nature, and as blind and fools, with the light of their intellect darkened, they do not know the stench and misery in which they are. It is not only that this sin stinks before me, who am the Supreme and Eternal Truth, it does indeed displease me so much and I hold it in such abomination that for it alone I buried five cities by a divine judgment, my divine justice being no longer able to endure it. This sin not only displeases me as I have said, but also the devils whom these wretches have made their masters. Not that the evil displeases them because they like anything good, but because their nature was originally angelic, and their angelic nature causes them to loathe the sight of the actual commission of this enormous sin.10

11.  Saint Bernardine of Siena (1380-1444)

Saint Bernardine of Siena was a famous preacher, celebrated for his doctrine and holiness. Regarding homosexuality, he stated:

“No sin in the world grips the soul as the accursed sodomy; this sin has always been detested by all those who live according to God.… Deviant passion is close to madness; this vice disturbs the intellect, destroys elevation and generosity of soul, brings the mind down from great thoughts to the lowliest, makes the person slothful, irascible, obstinate and obdurate, servile and soft and incapable of anything; furthermore, agitated by an insatiable craving for pleasure, the person follows not reason but frenzy.… They become blind and, when their thoughts should soar to high and great things, they are broken down and reduced to vile and useless and putrid things, which could never make them happy…. Just as people participate in the glory of God in different degrees, so also in hell some suffer more than others. He who lived with this vice of sodomy suffers more than another, for this is the greatest sin.”11

12.  Saint Peter Canisius (1521-1597)

Saint Peter Canisius, Jesuit and Doctor of the Church, is responsible for helping one third of Germany abandon Lutheranism and return to the Church. To Scripture’s condemnation of homosexuality, he added his own:

“As the Sacred Scripture says, the Sodomites were wicked and exceedingly sinful. Saint Peter and Saint Paul condemn this nefarious and depraved sin. In fact, the Scripture denounces this enormous indecency thus: ‘The scandal of Sodomites and Gomorrhans has multiplied and their sins have become grave beyond measure.’ So the angels said to just Lot, who totally abhorred the depravity of the Sodomites: ‘Let us leave this city….’ Holy Scripture does not fail to mention the causes that led the Sodomites, and can also lead others, to this most grievous sin. In fact, in Ezechiel we read: ‘Behold this was the iniquity of Sodom: pride, fullness of bread, and abundance, and the idleness of her, and of her daughters: and they did not put forth their hand to the needy, and the poor. And they were lifted up, and committed abominations before me; and I took them away as thou hast seen’ (Ezech. 16: 49-50). Those unashamed of violating divine and natural law are slaves of this never sufficiently execrated depravity.”12

Note: These quotes are taken from Defending A Higher Law: Why We Must Resist Same-Sex “Marriage” and the Homosexual Movement.

***

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Read the source: http://www.tfpstudentaction.org/politically-incorrect/homosexuality/12-quotes-against-sodomy-that-every-catholic-should-know.html

You may also wish to read:

10 Reasons Why Homosexual “Marriage” is Harmful and Must be Opposed

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1. Fr.. B. P. Pratten, trans., A Plea For The Christians, Chap. 34, www.newadvent.org/fathers/0205.htm[back]
2. Fr. S. Thelwall, trans., On Modesty, Chap. 4,  www.ccel.org/fathers2/ANF-04/anf04-19.htm [back]
3. W. J. Ferrar, trans., Demonstratio Evangelica, Book 4,  Chap. 10, http://www.intratext.com/IXT/ENG0882/_P19.HTM [back]
6. Book III, Chap. 8, no. 15, www.newadvent.org/fathers/110103.htm [back]
7. Morales sur Job, Part III, Vol. I, book 14, no. 23, p. 353. (Our translation.) [back]
8. St. Peter Damian, Book of Gomorrah, Pierre J. Payer, trans., (Waterloo, Ont.: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1982), pp. 63-64 [back]
9. St. Thomas Aquinas, Super Epistolam B. Pauli ad Romanos, Cap. 1, Lec. 8, (Our translation.) [back]
10. St. Catherine of Sienna, The Dialogue of the Seraphic Virgin (London: Burns, Oates and Washbourne, Ltd., 1925), p. 255 [back]
11. St. Bernardine of Siena, Sermon XXXIX in Prediche volgari, pp. 896-897, 915. [back]
12. St. Peter Canisius, Summa Doctrina Christianae, III a/b, p. 455 [back]
Related Articles/ Videos:

Here-under are some articles about marriage for you to read or watch: 

  1. Getting to know you, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=284
  2. Be Positive, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=288
  3. Love and Marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=292
  4. Endless Love – Marriage after all, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=294
  5. Say it with love, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=298
  6. Quality family moments, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=300
  7. Secret of successful marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=302
  8. The vocation of marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1968
  9. Marriage as Covenant, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1974
  10. Humility: Foundation for Marital Happiness, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1986
  11. Gratitude: Foundation for marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1980
  12. True Meaning of marriage, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=1972
  13. Marriage and incompatibility, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2112
  14. Love is a garden, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2116
  15. Three kinds of love, please click this link: http://www.pagadiandiocese.org/?p=2095

“God himself is the author of marriage” (GS 48:1). The vocation of marriage is written in the very nature of man and woman as they came from the hand of the Creator. Marriage is not a purely human institution despite the many variations it may have undergone through the centuries in different cultures, social structures, and spiritual attitudes (CCC:1603)

FBI Homosexuality. Many believe the Freemasons are simply a centuries-old charitable fraternity. However, the Catholic Church has consistently condemned Freemasonry more than any other error in its history because it promotes indifferentism, naturalism, communism, and other dangerous philosophies.

Please click this link to watch the video on FBI Homosexuality by Michael Voris

Homosexuality, the Grave Evil Presented as Good, Part 1

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexuality: Grave Evil Presented as Good, Part 1

Homosexuality, Question and Answer Part 2

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexuality, Q & A

Homosexuals and Freemasons inside the Church

Please click this link to watch the video on Homosexual and Freemasons inside the Church by Michael Voris

“The Rite of Sodomy” Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Please click this link to watch the video on “The Rite of Sodomy” Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Mic’d Up “Pink Money and the Homosexual Mafia” 

Please click this link to watch the video on Mic’d Up “Pink Money and the Homosexual Mafia”

Michael Voris gives a series of short talks, answering questions coming in response to his talk on homosexuality in Nigeria.

In this talk from Nigeria, Michael Voris speaks about the grave evil presented as good – homosexuality. “Homosexuality refers to relations between men or between women who experience an exclusive or predominant sexual attraction toward persons of the same sex. It has taken great variety of forms through the centuries and in different cultures. Its psychological genesis remains largely unexplained. Basing itself on Sacred Scripture, which presents homosexual acts as acts of grave depravity (cf. Gen 19:1-29; Rom 1:24-27; 1 Cor 6:10; 1 Tim 1:10), tradition has always declared that ‘homosexual acts are intinsically disordered” (CDF, Persona humana 8). They are contrary to the natural law. They close the sexual act to the gift of life. They do not proceed from a genuine affective and sexual complementarity. Under no circumstances can they be approved” (CCC: 2357).

Readings & Reflections: Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, Apostles, June 29,2015

Readings & Reflections: Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, Apostles, June 29,2015

Peter, a poor fisherman, was called by Christ to lead and care for Christ’s entire flock: “Feed my sheep!” (Jn 21:17). It was Peter who received a vision confirming that the Good News was to be preached to those the Jews considered unclean, the pagan Gentiles (cf. Acts 10:9-16). Paul, the former Pharisee carried out this missionary mandate. In the course of his preaching he was flogged, beaten, stoned, shipwrecked, and attacked by brigands (cf. 2 Cor 11:24-27). Both Peter and Paul ended their ministry in Rome around the year 54. Tradition holds that Peter was crucified upside-down and Paul beheaded by the sword.

AMDG+

Opening Prayer

“Lord Jesus, I profess and believe that you are the Christ, the Son of the living God. You are my Lord and my Savior. Make my faith strong like Peter’s and give me boldness to speak of you to others that they may come to know you personally as Lord and Savior and grow in the knowledge of your love”. In your mighty Name, I pray. Amen.

Reading 1
Acts 12:1-11

In those days, King Herod laid hands upon some members of the Church to harm them.He had James, the brother of John, killed by the sword,
and when he saw that this was pleasing to the Jews
he proceeded to arrest Peter also.
-It was the feast of Unleavened Bread.-
He had him taken into custody and put in prison
under the guard of four squads of four soldiers each.
He intended to bring him before the people after Passover.
Peter thus was being kept in prison,
but prayer by the Church was fervently being made
to God on his behalf.

On the very night before Herod was to bring him to trial,
Peter, secured by double chains,
was sleeping between two soldiers,
while outside the door guards kept watch on the prison.
Suddenly the angel of the Lord stood by him
and a light shone in the cell.
He tapped Peter on the side and awakened him, saying,
“Get up quickly.”
The chains fell from his wrists.
The angel said to him, “Put on your belt and your sandals.”
He did so.
Then he said to him, “Put on your cloak and follow me.”
So he followed him out,
not realizing that what was happening through the angel was real;
he thought he was seeing a vision.
They passed the first guard, then the second,
and came to the iron gate leading out to the city,
which opened for them by itself.
They emerged and made their way down an alley,
and suddenly the angel left him.
Then Peter recovered his senses and said,
“Now I know for certain
that the Lord sent his angel
and rescued me from the hand of Herod
and from all that the Jewish people had been expecting.”

The word of the Lord.

Responsorial Psalm
Ps 34:2-3, 4-5, 6-7, 8-9

R. (5) The angel of the Lord will rescue those who fear him.
I will bless the LORD at all times;
his praise shall be ever in my mouth.
Let my soul glory in the LORD;
the lowly will hear me and be glad.
R. The angel of the Lord will rescue those who fear him.
Glorify the LORD with me,
let us together extol his name.
I sought the LORD, and he answered me
and delivered me from all my fears.
R. The angel of the Lord will rescue those who fear him.
Look to him that you may be radiant with joy,
and your faces may not blush with shame.
When the poor one called out, the LORD heard,
and from all his distress he saved him.
R. The angel of the Lord will rescue those who fear him.
The angel of the LORD encamps
around those who fear him, and delivers them.
Taste and see how good the LORD is;
blessed the man who takes refuge in him.
R. The angel of the Lord will rescue those who fear him.

Reading II
2 Tm 4:6-8, 17-18

I, Paul, am already being poured out like a libation,
and the time of my departure is at hand.
I have competed well; I have finished the race;
I have kept the faith.
From now on the crown of righteousness awaits me,
which the Lord, the just judge,
will award to me on that day, and not only to me,
but to all who have longed for his appearance.

The Lord stood by me and gave me strength,
so that through me the proclamation might be completed
and all the Gentiles might hear it.
And I was rescued from the lion’s mouth.
The Lord will rescue me from every evil threat
and will bring me safe to his heavenly Kingdom.
To him be glory forever and ever.  Amen.

The word of the Lord.

Gospel
Mt 16:13-19

When Jesus went into the region of Caesarea Philippi
he asked his disciples,
“Who do people say that the Son of Man is?”
They replied, “Some say John the Baptist, others Elijah,
still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.”
He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?”
Simon Peter said in reply,
“You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.”
Jesus said to him in reply, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah.
For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my heavenly Father.
And so I say to you, you are Peter,
and upon this rock I will build my Church,
and the gates of the netherworld shall not prevail against it.
I will give you the keys to the Kingdom of heaven.
Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven;
and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.”

The Gospel of the Lord.

Reflection 1 – Who do people say?

‘“When Jesus went into the region of Caesarea Philippi he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is? They replied, “Some say John the Baptist, others Elijah, still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter said in reply, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.”’

If we call Jesus just a good man or even a great man, we are not giving what is due Him. We are actually insulting Him as anything less than what acknowledges Him as God the Son denies Him and the Truth that we have in Him. Anything which does not give His true and real Being defames His character as God made man.

Jesus is the embodiment of the Father’s unconditional love for us. He is God’s righteousness and faithfulness as He is the Messiah God promised to send us. He is God’s Infinite Wisdom and Perfect Plan for mankind. He is compassionate, gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in loving kindness and truth. Jesus is the ultimate atoning sacrifice made for all our sins.

And finally, Jesus is the new covenant relationship with God which gives us the opportunity to experience eternity. His blood established a new covenant and a chance for all men to spend eternity in the presence of God.  He is God’s perfect will carried out on the Cross. Jesus is the decisive triumph over eternal condemnation. Jesus is the Anointed One, the Messiah!

Yes, Jesus is the greatest blessing poured out to a world thirsty for the saving grace of the one true God. He is Emmanuel, God with us and nobody can take Him away from us. Jesus is God, the One True God.

When Jesus came he was not recognized by the Jews as their Messiah, their warrior king, but instead most of them sat and waited for their savior, for the Messiah. Today, we are all blessed to recognize and proclaim that Jesus is the Messiah (the anointed one in Hebrew and in Greek is ‘the Christ’) the Son of the Living God!

As I ventured to respond to the question on Who Jesus is I know that I have endeavored to do the impossible for Jesus is beyond description. But in very simple terms, Jesus is my everything, my all in all, my very life and the very essence of my being.

Jesus, I will never be without You for without You I am nothing! To Him be glory forever and ever. Amen. Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (AMDG)!

Direction 

We ought to know Jesus by giving Him a chance in our lives. Let us make space for Him in our hearts. 

Prayer

Heavenly Father, reveal yourself to me more and more through your Son Jesus. In Him, I pray. Amen.

Reflection 2 – Sts. Peter and Paul Feast Day

This feast is almost entirely devoted to St. Peter, bishop of Rome. After the descent of the Holy Spirit, St. Peter preached the gospel in Judea and was cast into prison by the cruel Herod. He was miraculously delivered by an angel and established his See first at Antioch, and then finally in Rome. Like St. Paul, he died at Rome during the persecution of Nero c. 64-68 A.D. by being crucified head downward.

The apostle Peter and Paul rely totally on God to guide them and to grant faith to those who hear their preaching. Their human weakness makes God’s power more obvious (2 Tim 4:6-8,17-18).

In the gospel today, Jesus changes the name of Simon to Peter, which means “rock.” To the Jews, a change of name means a change of the very person and of that person’s life. Peter will be the human rock of firmness that will protect the word of God and will guide the whole Church.

Jesus gave to Peter, upon whom he built his Church, the “keys of the kingdom of God.” This ministry carries the responsibility of disclosing to people the condition for entry or exclusion from the kingdom of God. And the purpose of this ministry is to serve the kingdom of God in the here and now. Faith in Jesus Christ makes us into rocks or spiritual stones for the service of kingdom of God. We become one with Jesus the Christ in faithful obedience to the will of the Father by accepting suffering and death on the cross for our salvation. But how can we continue the ministry of Peter of service today?

Here are the words from Blessed Pope John Paul II, “In their apostolic mission, Saints Peter and Paul were obliged to face difficulties of every kind. But, far from deterring their missionary activity, these difficulties reinforced their zeal for the Church’s welfare and for the salvation of mankind. They were able to overcome every trial because their trust was not based on human resources but on the grace of the Lord, who delivers his friends from every evil and saves them for his kingdom. May our holy patrons, Peter and Paul, sustain us and obtain for us that missionary zeal which made them witnesses of Christ to the ends of the then-known world.”

“Lord Jesus, I profess and believe that you are the Christ, the Son of the living God. You are my Lord and my Savior. Make my faith strong like Peter and give me the boldness to speak of you to others that they may come to know you personally as Lord and Savior and grow in the knowledge of your love.”

Reflection 3 – Sts. Peter and Paul, the two Pillars

Sts. Peter and Paul, whom we honor today, could tell us so much about life and death. They had difficulties, many of them, but they had peace within. They were humble and let Christ lead them and overcame their fears. Many now ignore Christ, too busy playing with their adult toys, and wonder why their lives are dysfunctional.

In the past people were more humble. They did not think they knew everything. They begged God’s blessings and were comforted and consoled by Christ. Now it is different. Bishop Sheen said, “There never has been a time in history when more people were more unhappy.” This puzzles us, for we have more prosperity than in the past. But it is prosperity that is the problem. The prosperous are most often proud. And the proud who think they know so much know so little. The proud say the Church is old-fashioned and not for us up-to-date moderns. They bring their troubles on themselves. They are worried and upset but are the great pretenders; they smile all the while, but within are in misery.

We have answers given us by Christ and his Church, but we are confused, being brainwashed by the media into thinking we people at present in the world are very bright. We are, in fact, very foolish. This makes many feel the past can tell us nothing. We in our pride talk all the time but do not know where we are going. We must listen to the saints, who are very wise, before it is too late. Being led about in life by contemporary gurus gets us nowhere.

The Church, a wise teacher, tells us openly and often that if we want peace of soul we must pray, especially at Mass, receive the sacraments and do kind deeds, imitating Christ “who went about doing good.” In this way divine assistance, sanctifying grace, comes to us and makes life bearable.

There is nothing more difficult than to stand by and watch people close to us make fools of themselves. But this is true of so many today. They are mediocre but think they are knowledgeable. Pride makes people stupid. Many now overfeed their bodies but starve their souls. They want happiness but are walking on the wrong road in the wrong direction. Proud people are never happy.

We must listen to the Church and hear Christ. We must pray to gain graces. We can never climb the mountain on our own. Cardinal John Wright said, “We members of the Church are optimistic, even though we recognized the errors of which human nature is capable of, for we have Christ’s promise that in and through the Church he will help us.” The Church is predestined for victory. He said, “We share the majesty and dignity, the courage, and so have spiritual liberty and are unafraid, for we are children of God.”

Robert Hugh Benson, English convert and priest-author wrote: “The Catholic Church is productive of results so startling and so unique as to equal her startling and unique claims. It is so great a relief in these days of negation and agnosticism to find an institution of solid affirmation.” (Source: Rev. Rawley Myers, “Homilies” Homiletic & Pastoral Review, Vol. CVIII, No. 8, New Jersey: Ignatius Press, May 2008, pp. 40-41; Suggested Reading: Catechism of the Catholic Church, 440-443, 640-642, 857-865, 1444).

Reflection 4 – The Right Answer

Simon Peter answered and said, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” —Matthew 16:16

When Jesus asked a question, it was not because He didn’t know the answer. You can be sure He was making a point.

Jesus and His disciples were in Caesarea Philippi, away from their own territory. It was a place of idolatry and oppression—a threatening place both politically and spiritually. In this environment, Jesus posed two important questions about the perception of His identity. He wasn’t interested in His popularity rating. He wanted His followers to be sure about the One they were following.

Today our culture is just as hostile and opposed to Jesus as when He first asked the question: “Who do men say that I, the Son of Man, am?” (Matt. 16:13). As in Jesus’ day, people offer a long list of inadequate and incorrect ideas about Jesus, ranging from “just a good teacher” all the way to “divisive” and “intolerant.”

The real question was and continues to be: “Who do you say that I am?” (16:15). Peter boldly declared, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God” (v.16). Jesus said that Peter’s accurate confession was a God-given insight and that he was blessed because of his declaration (v.17).

Join Peter in confessing that Jesus is your Savior. Your life will be bolstered and blessed.  — Joe Stowell

O receive Him today who so loved you
That He died on the cross for your sin;
O believe Him and open your heart’s door,
Let the Savior who loves you come in. —Anon.

Whoever believes that Jesus is the Christ is born of God. —1 John 5:1 (Source: Our Daily Bread, RBC Ministries).

Reflection 5 – A Fragile Stone

Peter answered and said, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” —Matthew 16:16

When writing on the life of Simon Peter, songwriter and author Michael Card described the apostle as “a fragile stone.” It is a term filled with contrast, yet one that aptly describes Peter.

Throughout Peter’s life, we see this contrast lived out as he displayed moments of courage followed by spiritual failure. After his declaration of Christ as the Son of God, Jesus said to him, “I also say to you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build My church, and the gates of Hades shall not prevail against it” (Matthew 16:18). A rock. A stone. Peter, whose name means “a small stone,” proved to be fragile when he tried to dissuade Jesus from going to the cross, and when he denied Him three times after His arrest.

Peter, the “fragile stone,” reminds us that no amount of personal strength or talent can make us adequate for this life and its challenges. Only as we rest in the strength of Christ will we find His provision. When we acknowledge our frailty and dependence on Him, Christ’s strength can empower us for the troubles life throws our way.

Like Peter, we are all “fragile stones.” How grateful we can be for His strength that is made perfect in our weakness (2 Corinthians 12:9-10).  — Bill Crowder

God uses weakness to reveal
His great sufficiency;
So if we let Him work through us,
His power we will see.  —Sper

Only when we acknowledge our weakness can we be strong in the Lord (Source: Our Daily Bread, RBC Ministries).

Reflection 6 – The Center Of History

Jesus asked his disciples, “Who do people say the Son of Man is?” “Some say John the Baptist,” they answered. Others say Elijah, while others say Jeremiah or some other prophet. What about you? He asked them. Who do you say I am?” (Mt 16:13-15).

Simon Peter answered and said, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” —Matthew 16:16

In its biographical archives, The Washington Post identifies famous people with a single vocational notice, such as “home-run king” or “motion-picture star.” According to a reporter, one of these files is marked, “Jesus Christ (martyr).”

Every individual who considers Jesus Christ makes some judgment about Him. French philosopher and historian Ernest Renan said, “All history is incomprehensible without Christ.” American author Ralph Waldo Emerson concluded, “His name is not so much written but plowed into the history of the world.”

Kenneth Scott Latourette, former chairman of the department of religion at Yale Graduate School, wrote, “That short life of Jesus has been the most influential ever lived. Through Him millions have been transformed and have begun to live the life which He exemplified. Gauged by the consequences which have followed, the birth, life, and death and resurrection of Jesus have been the most important events in the history of man.”

What label do you put on Jesus Christ? If you agree that He is who He claimed to be, then let Him who is the center of history be not only the center of your creed but also the object of your loyalty and love.
Haddon W. Robinson

Christ wants to be the center of your life,
The reason for your being here at all;
He gave Himself a sacrifice for you,
And now He waits for you to hear His call. —Hess

Your decision about Jesus determines your destiny (Source: Our Daily Bread, RBC Ministries).

Reflection 7 – The Real Jesus

You are the Christ, the Son of the living God. —Matthew 16:16

Who is Jesus? Observing the ways He is portrayed these days, it’s almost impossible to recognize Him as the Jesus of the Bible. Some groups add to what the Bible says about Him, while others diminish Him to simple humanity, claiming that He was merely a wise teacher or a master moralist. Some would like to make Him disappear altogether.

But this is nothing new. It’s been happening for nearly 2,000 years. This reminds me of Thomas Jefferson, who wrote the US Declaration of Independence. He went through the New Testament Gospels with scissors and cut out all references to Jesus’ deity and the supernatural. This is known as The Jefferson Bible. Even recently, people have approached the Gospels in similar ways.

When Jesus asked His 12 disciples what people were saying about who He was, some answers were Elijah, Jeremiah, and John the Baptist, but these answers were all inadequate. Peter was correct when he said, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God” (Matthew 16:16).

Don’t be deceived by fuzzy, watered down, or false descriptions of Jesus that you read, see, or hear about. Stick to the Bible. When people try to minimize His identity, tell them in no uncertain terms who the real Jesus is!  — David C. Egner

All glory to Jesus, begotten of God,
The great I AM is He;
Creator, sustainer—but wonder of all,
The Lamb of Calvary! —Peterson

To know Jesus is to know God (Source: Our Daily Bread, RBC Ministries).

Reflection 8 – Saint Peter and Saint Paul by Pope Francis

“We are celebrating the Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, Apostles, principal patrons of the Church of Rome.

“I would like to offer… thoughts on the Petrine ministry, guided by the word “confirm.” What has the Bishop of Rome been called to confirm?

“First, to confirm in faith. The Gospel speaks of the confession of Peter: You are Christ, the Son of the living God (Mt 16:16), a confession which does not come from him but from our Father in heaven. Because of this confession, Jesus replies: You are Peter, and on this rock I will build my Church (Mt 16:18). The role, the ecclesial service of Peter, is founded upon his confession of faith in Jesus, the Son of the living God, made possible by a grace granted from on high. In the second part of today’s Gospel we see the peril of thinking in worldly terms. When Jesus speaks of his Death and Resurrection, of the path of God which does not correspond to the human path of power, flesh and blood reemerge in Peter: He took Jesus aside and began to rebuke him…. This must never happen to you (Mt 16:22). Jesus’ response is harsh: Get behind me, Satan! You are a hindrance to me (Mt 16:23). Whenever we let our thoughts, our feelings, or the logic of human power prevail, and we do not let ourselves be taught and guided by faith, by God, we become stumbling blocks. Faith in Christ is the light of our life as Christians and as ministers in the Church!

“To confirm in love. In the second reading we heard the moving words of Saint Paul: I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith (2 Tim 4:7). But what is this fight? It is not one of those fights fought with human weapons which sadly continue to cause bloodshed throughout the world; rather, it is the fight of martyrdom. Saint Paul has but one weapon: the message of Christ and the gift of his entire life for Christ and for others. It is precisely this readiness to lay himself open, personally, to be consumed for the sake of the Gospel, to make himself all things to all people, unstintingly, that gives him credibility and builds up the Church. The Bishop of Rome is called himself to life and to confirm his brothers and sisters in this love for Christ and for all others, without distinction, limits, or barriers. And not only the Bishop of Rome: each of you… have the same task: to let yourselves be consumed by the Gospel, to become all things to everyone. It is your task to hold nothing back, to go outside of yourselves in the service of the faithful and holy people of God” (Source: Pope Francis, Magnificat, Vol. 17, No. 4, June 2015, pp. 407-409).

Reflection 9 – Solemnity of Sts. Peter and Paul (d. 64 A.D. & 67 A.D.)

Published on Jul 2, 2014

Another part of a video series from Wordonfire.org. Father Barron will be commenting on subjects from modern day culture. For more visit http://www.wordonfire.org

Peter (d. 64?). St. Mark ends the first half of his Gospel with a triumphant climax. He has recorded doubt, misunderstanding and the opposition of many to Jesus. Now Peter makes his great confession of faith: “You are the Messiah” (Mark 8:29b). It was one of the many glorious moments in Peter’s life, beginning with the day he was called from his nets along the Sea of Galilee to become a fisher of men for Jesus.

The New Testament clearly shows Peter as the leader of the apostles, chosen by Jesus to have a special relationship with him. With James and John he was privileged to witness the Transfiguration, the raising of a dead child to life and the agony in Gethsemane. His mother-in-law was cured by Jesus. He was sent with John to prepare for the last Passover before Jesus’ death. His name is first on every list of apostles.

And to Peter only did Jesus say, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah. For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my heavenly Father. And so I say to you, you are Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of the netherworld shall not prevail against it. I will give you the keys to the kingdom of heaven. Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven” (Matthew 16:17b-19).

But the Gospels prove their own trustworthiness by the unflattering details they include about Peter. He clearly had no public relations person. It is a great comfort for ordinary mortals to know that Peter also has his human weakness, even in the presence of Jesus.

He generously gave up all things, yet he can ask in childish self-regard, “What are we going to get for all this?” (see Matthew 19:27). He receives the full force of Christ’s anger when he objects to the idea of a suffering Messiah: “Get behind me, Satan! You are an obstacle to me. You are thinking not as God does, but as human beings do” (Matthew 16:23b).

Peter is willing to accept Jesus’ doctrine of forgiveness, but suggests a limit of seven times. He walks on the water in faith, but sinks in doubt. He refuses to let Jesus wash his feet, then wants his whole body cleansed. He swears at the Last Supper that he will never deny Jesus, and then swears to a servant maid that he has never known the man. He loyally resists the first attempt to arrest Jesus by cutting off Malchus’s ear, but in the end he runs away with the others. In the depth of his sorrow, Jesus looks on him and forgives him, and he goes out and sheds bitter tears. The Risen Jesus told Peter to feed his lambs and his sheep (John 21:15-17).

Paul (d. 64?). If the most well-known preacher today suddenly began preaching that the United States should adopt Marxism and not rely on the Constitution, the angry reaction would help us understand Paul’s life when he started preaching that Christ alone can save us. He had been the most Pharisaic of Pharisees, the most legalistic of Mosaic lawyers. Now he suddenly appears to other Jews as a heretical welcomer of Gentiles, a traitor and apostate.

Paul’s central conviction was simple and absolute: Only God can save humanity. No human effort—even the most scrupulous observance of law—can create a human good which we can bring to God as reparation for sin and payment for grace. To be saved from itself, from sin, from the devil and from death, humanity must open itself completely to the saving power of Jesus.

Paul never lost his love for his Jewish family, though he carried on a lifelong debate with them about the uselessness of the Law without Christ. He reminded the Gentiles that they were grafted on the parent stock of the Jews, who were still God’s chosen people, the children of the promise.

In light of his preaching and teaching skills, Paul’s name has surfaced (among others) as a possible patron of the Internet.

Read the source: http://www.americancatholic.org/features/saints/saint.aspx?id=1429

Comment:

We would probably go to confession to Peter sooner than to any of the other apostles. He is perhaps a more striking example of the simple fact of holiness. Jesus says to us as he said, in effect, to Peter: “It is not you who have chosen me, but I who have chosen you. Peter, it is not human wisdom that makes it possible for you to believe, but my Father’s revelation. I, not you, build my Church.” Paul’s experience of the risen Jesus on the road to Damascus was the driving force that made him one of the most zealous, dynamic and courageous ambassadors of Christ the Church has ever had. But persecution, humiliation and weakness became his day-by-day carrying of the cross, material for further transformation. The dying Christ was in him; the living Christ was his life.

Pope Francis at Angelus: ‘Do Not Be Afraid; Just Have Faith’

Pope Francis at Angelus: ‘Do Not Be Afraid; Just Have Faith’

Francis Says Believers Are to ‘Touch’ Christ Confident of HIs Saving Grace

By Deborah Castellano Lubov

Vatican City State, June 28, 2015 (ZENIT.org)

If you are in need of healing, reach out to Christ for His saving grace. Pope Francis explored this theme today during his Angelus address to the faithful in St. Peter’s Square at noon.

The Pope recalled Mark’s Gospel today which shows two instances where two people were saved by their faith.The first involved a twelve-year-old daughter of one of the synagogue’s official. He fell at the feet of Jesus and begged him: ‘My daughter is at the point of death. Please, come lay your hands on her that she may get well and live.’ (Mark 5:23). In the meantime, news came that the girl died. To this, Jesus said, ‘Do not be afraid; just have faith’ (v. 36). Jesus entered the house, sent all the crying people away, turned to the dead child and said, ‘Little girl, I say to you, arise!’ Immediately, the girl got up and began walking.

“Here,” the Pope highlighted, “we see the absolute power of Jesus over physical death, that, for Him, it is like a sleep from which one can awaken.”

The second episode within this narrative, Francis went on to say, discusses the healing of a woman who was suffering from blood loss for 12 years. This disease, according to the culture of the time, made her “unclean,” the Pope pointed out, noting that if she didn’t avoid all human contact, she would be condemned to civil death. This anonymous woman in the crowd following Jesus, said to herself, ‘If I but touch His clothes, I shall be cured.’ (v. 28). Jesus noticed her and, in the midst of people, sought her face. She comes forward trembling. Jesus tells her, ‘Daughter, your faith has saved you,’ and heals her.

“Who believes, ‘touches’ Jesus and draws from Him the grace that saves,” Francis said, adding, “Faith is this: to touch him and expect to draw from Him his saving grace. It saves us in the spiritual life. It saves us many problems!”

The Pope underscored that the voice of the heavenly Father speaks in Jesus in this episode, saying, “‘Daughter, you are not cursed, you are not excluded, you are my daughter!”

“Every time when Jesus approaches us, when we go to Him, we hear this from the Father: ‘Son. You are my son, you are my daughter, you’re healed, you’re healed. I heal all, everyone and everything,” Francis said off the cuff.

Both instances are centered on faith, said the Pontiff. ​”The message is clear and can be summed up in one question: Do we believe that Jesus can heal us and can awaken us from the dead?” he said.

The Gospel this Sunday, the Holy Father urged, “invites us to live in the certainty of the Resurrection: Jesus is Lord, has power over evil and death, and wants to take us into the Father’s home, where life reigns.” In history, the Resurrection of Christ acts as the beginning of renewal and hope, Francis reminded the faithful.

After the Angelus, Pope Francis concluded wishing all those present a good Sunday, a good lunch, and asking them to pray for him.

***

On ZENIT’s Web page:

Full Translation: http://www.zenit.org/en/articles/pope-s-angelus-address–5

Gospel Reading: http://www.zenit.org/en/articles/gospel-reading-for-sunday-june-28th

Read it online

Pope’s Angelus Address

‘Who believes ‘touches’ Jesus and draws from Him the grace that saves.’

By Staff Reporter

Vatican City State, June 28, 2015 (ZENIT.org)

Below is a ZENIT translation of Pope Francis’ address today to the faithful in St. Peter’s Square before and after the recitation of the Angelus:

***

Before the Angelus:

Dear brothers and sisters, good morning!

Today’s Gospel presents the story of the resurrection of a twelve-year-old daughter of one of the heads of the synagogue, who fell at the feet of Jesus and begged him: “My daughter is at the point of death. Please, come lay your hands on her that she may get well and live.” (Mark 5:23). In this prayer, we feel the concern of every father for the life and for the sake of his children. But we also feel the great faith that this man has in Jesus. And when the news that the girl is dead, Jesus says, “Do not be afraid; just have faith” (v. 36). He entered the house, the Lord sent away all the people crying and crying, and turns to the dead child and said, “Little girl, I say to you, arise!” (v. 41). And immediately the girl got up and began walking. Here, we see the absolute power of Jesus over physical death, that, for Him, it is like a sleep from which one can awaken.

Within this narrative, the Evangelist puts another episode: the healing of a woman who for twelve years was suffering from hemorrhages. This disease, according to the culture of the time, made her “unclean,” she had to avoid all human contact or she would be condemned to civil death. This anonymous woman in the crowd following Jesus, says to herself, “If I but touch his clothes, I shall be cured.” (v. 28). And so it happens: the need to be liberated, along with her ‘ripping’ faith, so to speak, drives her to the Lord for healing.  Who believes, “touches” Jesus and draws from Him the grace that saves. Faith is this, to touch him and expect to draw from Him his saving grace. It saves us in the spiritual life. It saves us many problems! Jesus notices her and, in the midst of people, seeks the face of the woman. She comes forward trembling and He says, “Daughter, your faith has saved you” (v. 34). It is the voice of the heavenly Father who speaks in Jesus: “Daughter, you are not cursed, you are not excluded, you are my daughter!” Every time when Jesus approaches us, when we go to Him, we hear this from the Father: ‘Son. You are my son, you are my daughter, you’re healed, you’re healed. I heal all, everyone and everything.”

These two episodes – a healing and resurrection – have a single center: the faith. The message is clear and can be summed up in one question: Do we believe that Jesus can heal us and can awaken us from the dead? The whole Gospel is written in the light of faith: Jesus is risen, He has conquered death, and because of this victory, we will be resurrected. This faith, who for the first Christians was secure, could tarnish and become uncertain, to the point that some confuse resurrection with reincarnation. The Gospel this Sunday invites us to live in the certainty of the resurrection: Jesus is Lord, has power over evil and death, and wants to take us into the Father’s home, where life reigns.

The Resurrection of Christ acts in history as the beginning of renewal and hope. Anyone who is desperate and tired until death, if he relies on Jesus, his love can start living again. Faith is a force of life, gives fullness to our humanity; and those who believe in Christ, must recognize that because it promotes life in every situation, to be lived by all, especially the weakest, the love of God that frees and saves. We ask the Lord, through the intercession of the Virgin Mary, for the gift of a strong faith and courage that pushes us to spread hope and life among our brothers.

After the Angelus:

Dear brothers and sisters, I greet you all, Romans and pilgrims! I greet in particular the marchers ‘Una Terra, Una Famiglia Umana,’ (“A land, a Human Family.”) I encourage the collaboration between people of different religions and associations for the promotion of an integral ecology. Thank you FOCSIV, OurVoices and other organizers, and I wish you good work for young people of different countries who in these days are confronted with the care of the common home.

I cordially salute a group of Bolivian residents in Italy that have brought here some of the images of the Virgin of Urkupina, the Virgin of Copacabana, among others. Our Heavenly Mother protects us. I also send greetings to the youth group of Ibiza who are preparing to receive the confirmation. If they pray, pray for me .

I salute the Guides, they are really great these scouts, really great, and do a lot of good, the women Scouts, who belong to the International Catholic Conference and renew to them my encouragement. Thank you!

I greet the faithful of Novoli, the polyphonic choral of Augusta, the boys of some parishes in the diocese of Padua who received their Confirmation; the “Grandparents of Sydney,” an association of elderly immigrants in Australia have come here with their grandchildren; the children of Chernobyl and the families of Este and Ospedaletto hosting them; cyclists and motorcyclists from Cardito and lovers of vintage cars.

I wish you all a good Sunday and a good lunch. Please do not forget to pray for me. see you soon!

[Original Text: Italian]

[Translation by Deborah Castellano Lubov]