Dialogue between Pope Francis and journalists during the return flight from Colombia

Dialogue between Pope Francis and journalists during the return flight from Colombia

Published on Sep 11, 2017

Subscribe!: http://smarturl.it/RomeReports Visit our website to learn more: http://www.romereports.com/en Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RomeReportsENG/ September 11, 2017. He assessed the trip and talked about other topics like Venezuela and Trump’s latest measures.

Pope: Wrong to Separate Young People from Families

Responds to Questions About DACA During In-Flight Press Conference

pope with reporters

Vol Cartagena-Rome, Photo Courtoisie Du P. Antonio Spadaro SJ

Pope Francis stressed the importance of family unity in responding to questions during an in-flight press conference on September 10, 2017, according to Vatican Radio.  The discussion with reporters took place on the Pope’s return flight from Colombia to Rome.

Vatican Radio reported that the press conference was cut short do to turbulence, but the Holy Father still had 30 minutes of exchange with reporters on the flight.

Asked by reporters about the recent decision by the U.S. President Donald Trump to rescind an Obama administration immigration policy known as DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals), Pope Francis said he had not read enough to express an opinion.

However, he said that separating young people from their families is not good either for the young or for the family, according to Vatican Radio. Noting that the policy was crafted by the executive branch, rather than through the legislature, the Pope said there may be hope that it could be considered anew.

The Pope said Trump presents himself as pro-life, “and if he is a good pro-lifer, he understands that the family is the cradle of life, and that he must defend the unity” (of the family), according to Vatican Radio.   The Holy Father then spoke of the need young people have of roots, and noted that he had spoken about the importance of dialogue between young people and the elderly.

“Young people need to find their roots again,” he said. “Anything that goes against the roots,” he continued, “steals their hope.”

According to Vatican Radio, Pope Francis insisted that he did not want to express his opinion on DACA because he prefers not to speak on issues he has not studied

However, he continued that deporting young people s would mean losing roots; “and this is a problem.” And he called attention to the suffering Mexico has endured, and called for prayers for that country.

Returning From Colombia, Pope Stops at Santa Maria Maggiore

After His 20th Apostolic Visit Abroad, Francis Prays Before Mary in Marian Basilica

Pope Prays At Santa Maria Maggiore – © PHOTO.VA – OSSERVATORE ROMANO

Monday afternoon after having landed in Rome’s Ciampino Airport, Sept. 11, 2017, Pope Francis traveled to the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore to offer thanks for the success of his five-day Apostolic Trip to Colombia.

According to a note from the Holy See Press Office, the Holy Father made his usual detour to go to the Marian Basilica.

The Holy Father always venerates the icon before and after his international apostolic trips.

During his time inside, Francis prayed before the ancient image of Mary, Salus Populi Romani, in silence for several minutes.

Pope Again Exhorts Colombians:  “Take the First Step”

Pope Francis’ Final Mass of Trip, Port of Cartagena

pope in cartagena

CTV Screenshot

Returning to a consistent theme of his visit to Colombia, Pope Francis urged Colombians to “take the first step” in his homily at the Port of Cartagena on September 10, 2017.

It was his final Mass in Colombia, and he again made a plea for peace, noting that the first step is “to go out and meet others with Christ the Lord.”

The Holy Father cited the model of Saint Peter Claver, whose shrine he visited earlier the same day:

“Here, in the Sanctuary of Saint Peter Claver, where the progress and application of human rights in Colombia continue to be studied and monitored in a systematic way, the Word of God speaks to us of forgiveness, correction, community and prayer.”

The Pope went on to describe what he had experienced on the trip, especially “many testimonies from those who have reached out to people who had harmed them; terrible wounds that I could see in their own bodies; irreparable losses that still bring tears.”

“Yet they have reached out, have taken a first step on a different path to the one already travelled.”

Francis stressed the personal human role required for a change in Colombian suffering, noting that, “We can contribute greatly to this new step that Colombia wants to take.”  And he reminded the congregation: “Jesus tells us that this path of reintegration into the community begins with a dialogue of two persons.

“Nothing can replace that healing encounter; no collective process excuses us from the challenge of meeting, clarifying, forgiving.”

The Holy Father concluded with a direct appeal for peace:  “If Colombia wants a stable and lasting peace, it must urgently take a step in this direction, which is that of the common good, of equity, of justice, of respect for human nature and its demands.”

 

Vatican translation of Pope Francis’ homily at Mass at the Port of Cartagena, Colombia, September 20, 2017

In this city, which has been called “heroic” for its tenacity in defending freedom two hundred years ago, I celebrate the concluding Mass of my Visit to Colombia.  For the past thirty-two years Cartagena de Indias is also the headquarters in Colombia for Human Rights.  For here the people cherish the fact that, “thanks to the missionary team formed by the Jesuit priests Peter Claver y Corberó, Alonso de Sandoval and Brother Nicolás González, accompanied by many citizens of the city of Cartagena de Indias in the seventeenth century, the desire was born to alleviate the situation of the oppressed of that time, especially of slaves, of those who implored fair treatment and freedom” (Congress of Colombia 1985, law 95, art. 1).

Here, in the Sanctuary of Saint Peter Claver, where the progress and application of human rights in Colombia continue to be studied and monitored in a systematic way, the Word of God speaks to us of forgiveness, correction, community and prayer.

In the fourth sermon of Matthew’s Gospel, Jesus speaks to us, who have decided to support the community, to us, who value life together and dream of a project that includes everyone.  The preceding text is that of the good shepherd who leaves the ninety-nine sheep to go after the one that is lost.  This fact pervades the entire text: there is no one too lost to deserve our care, our closeness and our forgiveness.  From this perspective, we can see that a fault or a sin committed by one person challenges us all, but involves, primarily, the victim of someone’s sin.  He or she is called to take the initiative so that whoever has caused the harm is not lost.

During these past few days I have heard many testimonies from those who have reached out to people who had harmed them; terrible wounds that I could see in their own bodies; irreparable losses that still bring tears.  Yet they have reached out, have taken a first step on a different path to the one already travelled.  For decades Colombia has yearned for peace but, as Jesus teaches, two sides approaching each other to dialogue is not enough; it has also been necessary to involve many more actors in this dialogue aimed at healing sins.  The Lord tells us in the Gospel: “If your brother does not listen to you, take one or two others along with you” (Mt 18:16).

We have learned that these ways of making peace, of placing reason above revenge, of the delicate harmony between politics and law, cannot ignore the involvement of the people.  Peace is not achieved by normative frameworks and institutional arrangements between well-intentioned political or economic groups.  Jesus finds the solution to the harm inflicted through a personal encounter between the parties.  It is always helpful, moreover, to incorporate into our peace processes the experience of those sectors that have often been overlooked, so that communities themselves can influence the development of collective memory.  “The principal author, the historic subject of this process, is the people as a whole and their culture, and not a single class, minority, group or elite. We do not need plans drawn up by a few for the few, or an enlightened or outspoken minority which claims to speak for everyone. It is about agreeing to live together, a social and cultural pact” (cf. Evangelii Gaudium, 239).

We can contribute greatly to this new step that Colombia wants to take.  Jesus tells us that this path of reintegration into the community begins with a dialogue of two persons.  Nothing can replace that healing encounter; no collective process excuses us from the challenge of meeting, clarifying, forgiving.  Deep historic wounds necessarily require moments where justice is done, where victims are given the opportunity to know the truth, where damage is adequately repaired and clear commitments are made to avoid repeating those crimes.  But that is only the beginning of the Christian response.  We are required to generate “from below” a change in culture: so that we respond to the culture of death and violence, with the culture of life and encounter.  We have already learned this from your own beloved author whom we all benefit from:  “This cultural disaster is not remedied with lead or silver, but with an education for peace, built lovingly on the rubble of an angry country where we rise early to continue killing each other… a legitimate revolution of peace which channels towards life an immense creative energy that for almost two centuries we have used to destroy us and that vindicates and exalts the predominance of the imagination” (Gabriel García Márquez, Message About Peace, 1998).

How much have we worked for an encounter, for peace? How much have we neglected, allowing barbarity to become enfleshed in the life of our people?  Jesus commands us to confront those types of behavior, those ways of living that damage society and destroy the community.  How many times have we “normalized” the logic of violence and social exclusion, without prophetically raising our hands or voices!  Alongside Saint Peter Claver were thousands of Christians, many of them consecrated… but only a handful started a counter-cultural movement of encounter.  Saint Peter was able to restore the dignity and hope of hundreds of thousands of black people and slaves arriving in absolutely inhuman conditions, full of dread, with all their hopes lost.  He did not have prestigious academic qualifications, and he even said of himself that he was “mediocre” in terms of intelligence, but he had the genius to live the Gospel to the full, to meet those whom others considered merely as waste material.  Centuries later, the footsteps of this missionary and apostle of the Society of Jesus were followed by Saint María Bernarda Bütler, who dedicated her life to serving the poor and marginalized in this same city of Cartagena.1

In the encounter between us we rediscover our rights, and we recreate our lives so that they re-emerge as authentically human.  “The common home of all men and women must continue to rise on the foundations of a right understanding of universal fraternity and respect for the sacredness of every human life, of every man and every woman, the poor, the elderly, children, the infirm, the unborn, the unemployed, the abandoned, those considered disposable because they are only considered as part of a statistic. This common home of all men and women must also be built on the understanding of a certain sacredness of created nature” (Address to the United Nations, 25 September 2015).

Jesus also shows us the possibility that the other may remain closed, refusing to change, persisting in evil.  We cannot deny that there are people who persist in sins that damage the fabric of our coexistence and community: “I also think of the heart-breaking drama of drug abuse, which reaps profits in contempt of the moral and civil laws.  I think of the devastation of natural resources and ongoing pollution, and the tragedy of the exploitation of labor. I think too of illicit money trafficking and financial speculation, which often prove both predatory and harmful for entire economic and social systems, exposing millions of men and women to poverty. I think of prostitution, which every day reaps innocent victims, especially the young, robbing them of their future. I think of the abomination of human trafficking, crimes and abuses against minors, the horror of slavery still present in many parts of the world; the frequently overlooked tragedy of migrants, who are often victims of disgraceful and illegal manipulation” (Message for the World Day of Peace, 2014, 8), and even with a pacifist “sterile legality” that ignores the flesh of our brothers and sisters, the flesh of Christ.  We must also be prepared for this, and solidly base ourselves upon principles of justice that in no way diminish charity.  It is only possible to live peacefully by avoiding actions that corrupt or harm life.  In this context, we remember all those who, bravely and tirelessly, have worked and even lost their lives in defending and protecting the rights and the dignity of the human person.   History asks us to embrace a definitive commitment to defending human rights, here in Cartagena de Indias, the place that you have chosen as the national seat of their defense.

Finally, Jesus asks us to pray together, so that our prayer, even with its personal nuances and different emphases, becomes symphonic and arises as one single cry.  I am sure that today we pray together for the rescue of those who were wrong and not for their destruction, for justice and not revenge, for healing in truth and not for oblivion.  We pray to fulfil the theme of this visit: “Let us take the first step!” And may this first step be in a common direction.

To “take the first step” is, above all, to go out and meet others with Christ the Lord.  And he always asks us to take a determined and sure step towards our brothers and sisters, and to renounce our claim to be forgiven without showing forgiveness, to be loved without showing love.  If Colombia wants a stable and lasting peace, it must urgently take a step in this direction, which is that of the common good, of equity, of justice, of respect for human nature and its demands.  Only if we help to untie the knots of violence, will we unravel the complex threads of disagreements.  We are asked to take the step of meeting with our brothers and sisters, and to risk a correction that does not want to expel but to integrate.  And we are asked to be charitably firm in that which is not negotiable.  In short, the demand is to build peace, “speaking not with the tongue but with hands and works” (Saint Peter Claver), and to lift up our eyes to heaven together.  The Lord is able to untie that which seems impossible to us, and he has promised to accompany us to the end of time, and will bring to fruition all our efforts.

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1 She also had the wisdom of charity and knew how to find God in her neighbor; nor was she paralyzed by injustice and challenges, because “when conflict arises, some people simply look at it and go their way as if nothing happened; they wash their hands of it and get on with their lives. Others embrace it in such a way that they become its prisoners; they lose their bearings, project onto institutions their own confusion and dissatisfaction and thus make unity impossible. But there is also a third way, and it is the best way to deal with conflict. It is the willingness to face conflict head on, to resolve it and to make it a link in the chain of a new process” (Evangelii Gaudium, 227).